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The Constitution, the Articles, and Federalism: Crash Course US History #8
 
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In which John Green teaches you about the United States Constitution. During and after the American Revolutionary War, the government of the new country operated under the Articles of Confederation. While these Articles got the young nation through its war with England, they weren't of much use when it came to running a country. So, the founding fathers decided try their hand at nation-building, and they created the Constitution of the United States, which you may remember as the one that says We The People at the top. John will tell you how the convention came together, some of the compromises that had to be made to pass this thing, and why it's very lucky that the framers installed a somewhat reasonable process for making changes to the thing. You'll learn about Shays' Rebellion, the Federalist Papers, the elite vs rabble dynamic of the houses of congress, and start to find out just what an anti-federalist is. Hey teachers and students - Check out CommonLit's free collection of reading passages and curriculum resources to learn more about the events of this episode.Founding Fathers debated over how to govern the new nation, beginning with the Articles of Confederation: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/articles-of-confederation When the Founding Fathers finally wrote the Constitution, they realized that they needed to add The Bill of Rights to get citizens on board with the new government: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/the-bill-of-rights Follow us: http://www.twitter.com/thecrashcourse http://www.twitter.com/realjohngreen http://www.twitter.com/raoulmeyer http://www.twitter.com/crashcoursestan http://www.twitter.com/saysdanica http://www.twitter.com/thoughtbubbler Support CrashCourse on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse
Views: 4352866 CrashCourse
Can States Ignore Federal Law?
 
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What Is Fascism? http://testu.be/1TDPrN2 » Subscribe to NowThis World: http://go.nowth.is/World_Subscribe Donald Trump's rhetoric has gotten so xenophobic and crazy that many are wondering if he is secretly a fascist. So is Trump trying to be the US's first fascist president? Learn More: Donald Trump Is a Fascist http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/politics/2015/11/donald_trump_is_a_fascist_it_is_the_political_label_that_best_describes.html "In trying to explain Donald Trump, I looked to George Wallace, who played a similar role in American politics through the 1960s." Donald Trump wants to deport every single illegal immigrant - could he? http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-34789502 "US Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump wants to deport every illegal immigrant from the United States." What is Fascism? http://orwell.ru/library/articles/As_I_Please/english/efasc "Of all the unanswered questions of our time, perhaps the most important is: 'What is Fascism?'" Music Track Courtesy of APM Music: "Concentration" _________________________ NowThis World is dedicated to bringing you topical explainers about the world around you. Each week we’ll be exploring current stories in international news, by examining the facts, providing historical context, and outlining the key players involved. We’ll also highlight powerful countries, ideologies, influential leaders, and ongoing global conflicts that are shaping the current landscape of the international community across the globe today. More from NowThis: » Tweet @NowThisNews on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/News_Twitter » Subscribe to NowThis News: http://go.nowth.is/News_Subscribe » Like NowThis World on Facebook: https://go.nowth.is/World_Facebook » Connect with Judah: Follow @judah_robinson on Twitter – Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeJudah » Connect with Versha: Follow @versharma on Twitter – Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeVersha http://www.youtube.com/nowthisworld Special thanks to Jules Suzdaltsev for hosting TestTube! Check Jules out on Twitter: https://twitter.com/jules_su
Views: 163963 NowThis World
How the States Can Save America
 
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Washington is gigantic, corrupt, and unaccountable. Can it be fixed? Learn more about the Convention of States and Article V of the Constitution. Jim DeMint, former Senator from South Carolina, explains. Donate today to PragerU! http://l.prageru.com/2ylo1Yt Learn more about the Convention of States! Visit ConventionOfStates.com Joining PragerU is free! Sign up now to get all our videos as soon as they're released. http://prageru.com/signup Download Pragerpedia on your iPhone or Android! Thousands of sources and facts at your fingertips. iPhone: http://l.prageru.com/2dlsnbG Android: http://l.prageru.com/2dlsS5e Join Prager United to get new swag every quarter, exclusive early access to our videos, and an annual TownHall phone call with Dennis Prager! http://l.prageru.com/2c9n6ys Join PragerU's text list to have these videos, free merchandise giveaways and breaking announcements sent directly to your phone! https://optin.mobiniti.com/prageru Do you shop on Amazon? Click https://smile.amazon.com and a percentage of every Amazon purchase will be donated to PragerU. Same great products. Same low price. Shopping made meaningful. VISIT PragerU! https://www.prageru.com FOLLOW us! Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/prageru Twitter: https://twitter.com/prageru Instagram: https://instagram.com/prageru/ PragerU is on Snapchat! JOIN PragerFORCE! For Students: http://l.prageru.com/29SgPaX JOIN our Educators Network! http://l.prageru.com/2c8vsff Script: The federal government has become a lumbering giant. With each passing year, it gets bigger and scarier. In 1965, Washington was 761 billion dollars big (adjusted for inflation). In 2016... it was 3.5 trillion – five times the size. If the government spent only the money it collected in taxes, that would be one thing. But it always spends more—which is why we’re $20 trillion dollars in debt. That’s 13 zeroes. Count ‘em: Thirteen. But the crazy spending isn’t even the worst of it. Washington is involved in every part of our lives. Think about anything you do, from driving your car to buying your groceries to mowing your lawn. Whatever it is—your education, your job, your health— the government has its hands on your shoulder, if not on your throat. As a congressman and senator for 14 years, I know this only too well. So, how do we cut this giant down to size? Is it even possible? Yes. And the amazing thing is, the answer is right in front of us. The Founding Fathers, in their wisdom, foresaw the situation we find ourselves in today. They wrote into the Constitution a way to repair Washington...not from the inside, because that will never happen but from the outside, where it might. It’s right there in Article 5. Most people are familiar with the first part: “The Congress, whenever two thirds of both houses shall deem it necessary, shall propose amendments to this Constitution...” All 27 Amendments we have now started this way. Congress proposed them and at least three-quarters of the states ratified them. But is this the only way to amend the Constitution? Well, let’s read the next clause: It says that Congress, “…on the application of the legislatures of two thirds of the several states, shall call a convention for proposing amendments...” Did you catch that? Congress must call a convention to amend the Constitution if two-thirds of the states—that’s 34 states—demand it. The time has come to demand it. The time has come to propose amendments that will restore meaningful limits on federal power and authority. The time has come for a convention of states. Here’s how it would work: Once the 34 states call a convention, all 50 states send a delegate to represent their interests. For any constitutional amendments proposed, each state gets one vote. And an amendment only passes out of the convention and to the states for ratification if a majority of the states’ delegates vote in the affirmative. In this scenario, Congress has no say. It is completely in the hands of the states, which means it’s a whole lot closer to the hands of the people. We’ve never once amended the Constitution this way—but that doesn’t mean we can’t. But, you might ask, doesn’t this open the door to rewriting the entire Constitution? Antonin Scalia, the late Supreme Court justice, acknowledged this risk, but regarded it as a “minimal” and “reasonable” one. Why? Because to be ratified, a proposed amendment would need the approval of 38 states. That’s a high bar. Thirty-eight states would never agree to something radical like abolishing freedom of speech. “The Founders,” Scalia said, “knew the Congress would be unwilling to give attention to many issues the people are concerned with, particularly those involving restrictions on the federal government’s own power... [so] they provided the convention [of states] as a remedy.” For the complete script, visit https://www.prageru.com/videos/how-states-can-save-america
Views: 5197897 PragerU
What are States Rights and Responsibilities?
 
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People assume the states are weak and powerless because the federal government is the most covered by the media. State and local laws actually have more direct impact on you than any federal law does.
Views: 3352 anubis2814
Ask Teach: Supreme Court, States Rights, African American Education
 
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Visit us at: http://readingthroughhistory.com/ Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ReadingThroughHistory Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigmarshdawg77 In this video I answer questions posted to our various pages. In this episode, I answer 1) Is it possible for the U.S. Supreme Court to settle moral issues? 2) Should states have the right to ignore federal law? 3) Did African Americans go to school in the 1930s?
Civil Rights & Liberties: Crash Course Government #23
 
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Today, Craig is going to give you an overview of civil rights and civil liberties. Often these terms are used interchangeably, but they are actually very different. Our civil liberties, contained in the Bill of Rights, once only protected us from the federal government, but slowly these liberties have been incorporated to protect us from the states. We’ll take a look at how this has happened and the supreme court cases that got us here. Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Support is provided by Voqal: http://www.voqal.org All attributed images are licensed under Creative Commons by Attribution 2.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/legalcode Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 601611 CrashCourse
Jefferson and Hamilton Debate Federal vs. States' Rights
 
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Part of the Fractured Union series
Why Did The South Secede?
 
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Why did the South secede from the United States in the American Civil War? The reason why southern states seceded from the Union following the election of Abraham Lincoln in 1860 was to protect the institution of slavery. But how do we know? Well, let’s look at a few key pieces of evidence. Every state that seceded and joined the Confederacy issued Ordinances of Secession, but four of them actually went further. South Carolina, Mississippi, Georgia, and Texas issued Declarations that explained in detail their reasons for seceding. The Declaration of South Carolina, the first state to secede, begins by arguing that each state in the Union has a right to secede if the federal government doesn’t fulfill its constitutional obligations. It then describes which constitutional obligations the government has not met, namely the Fugitive Slave Clause in Article 4, which required a state to return a fugitive slave who escaped from another state to his/her legal owner. It claims that for several years this was respected, but that “an increasing hostility on the part of the non-slaveholding States to the institution of slavery, has led to a disregard of their obligations...” It also says that those northern states “have denounced as sinful the institution of slavery.” It then objects to the election of Abraham Lincoln, saying that “A geographical line has been drawn across the Union, and all the States north of that line have united in the election of a man to the high office of President of the United States, whose opinions and purposes are hostile to slavery. He is to be entrusted with the administration of the common Government, because he has declared that that ‘Government cannot endure permanently half slave, half free,’ and that the public mind must rest in the belief that slavery is in the course of ultimate extinction.” The second sentence of Mississippi’s Declaration says that “Our position is thoroughly identified with the institution of slavery - the greatest material interest of the world.” This one goes even further and espouses a racist ideology, claiming that slavery “supplies the product, which constitutes by far the largest and most important portions of commerce of the earth. These products are peculiar to the climate verging on the tropical regions, and by an imperious law of nature, none but the black race can bear exposure to the tropical sun.” Later, it claims that the northern free states advocate “negro equality, socially and politically,” and that they promote “insurrection and incendiarism in our midst.” Georgia’s Declaration of Secession states: “For the last ten years we have had numerous and serious causes of complaint against our non-slaveholding confederate States with reference to the subject of African slavery.” Texas’s Declaration proclaims that civil and political rights only belong to white men and goes on to say that “the servitude of the African race, as existing in these States, is mutually beneficial to both bond and free, and is abundantly authorized and justified by the experience of mankind, and the revealed will of the Almighty Creator, as recognized by all Christian nations.” It then argues that if the existing relations between the races are destroyed, they would “bring inevitable calamities upon both and desolation upon the fifteen slave-holding states.” It’s often said, especially by people who would like to absolve the South of its history of slavery, that the primary reason the southern states seceded is because of states’ rights and not to protect slavery. But what’s interesting when looking at these Declarations of Secession is that they repeatedly criticize the northern free states for not obeying federal laws and federal constitutional obligations. In other words, the southern states opposed northern states when they tried to assert their own states’ rights in a cause they happened not to like, namely the attempt to diminish and ultimately destroy the institution of slavery. Please show your support by watching our videos and subscribing to the channel!
Views: 3055 Natan's Notes
The United States Constitution and Bill of Rights
 
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A whiteboard video on the U.S. Constitution and Bill of Rights. My students use the following textbook, some of whose units I have intended to summarize with these videos: Alavosus, Laura, editor. Social Studies Alive! America's Past. Palo Alto: TCI, 2010. The whiteboard designs and spoken commentary are all my own.
Views: 120738 Ryan Hill
The Articles of Confederation - Becoming the United States - Extra History - #1
 
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When the thirteen colonies of North America broke away from Great Britain, they struggled to draft their first constitution. After great debate, they created the Articles of Confederation and formed the United States of America. Support us on Patreon! http://bit.ly/EHPatreon (--More below) Grab your Extra Credits gear at the store! http://bit.ly/ExtraStore Subscribe for new episodes every Saturday! http://bit.ly/SubToEC Play games with us on Extra Play! http://bit.ly/WatchEXP Talk to us on Twitter (@ExtraCreditz): http://bit.ly/ECTweet Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/ECFBPage Get our list of recommended games on Steam: http://bit.ly/ECCurator ____________ ♪ Get the intro music here! http://bit.ly/1EQA5N7 *Music by Demetori: http://bit.ly/1AaJG4H ♪ Get the outro music here! http://bit.ly/23isQfx *Music by Sean and Dean Kiner: http://bit.ly/1WdBhnm
Views: 1108005 Extra Credits
Federalism in the 21st Century: Balancing States' Rights with Federal Power
 
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When a draft of the United States Constitution was approved by the Constitutional Convention in September of 1787, and sent to the states for ratification by the people, many delegates to the ratifying conventions were deeply concerned about what impact the newly envisioned national government would have on the states that comprised the union. Since that time, the role and power of the federal government have increased substantially, while the role and power of several states have diminished in comparison. The panel will discuss current Supreme Court federalism jurisprudence, offer their predictions on the direction the Roberts' court is likely to take, and debate the proper balance between federal and state power. Introduction: Hon. Milan D. Smith, Jr., Circuit Judge U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit Moderator: Erwin Chemerinsky, Founding Dean, University of California Irvine School of Law Panelists: Lynn A. Baker, Frederick M. Baron Chair in Law, University of Texas, School of Law David Oedel, Professor of Constitutional Law, Mercer University Law School Edward Rubin, Professor of Law and Political Science, Vanderbilt University Erin Ryan, Haiyang Daxue in 2011 and Lewis & Clark Law School in 2012 Recorded: August 16, 2011 2011 Ninth Circuit Judicial Conference
Why wasn’t the Bill of Rights originally in the US Constitution? - James Coll
 
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View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/why-wasn-t-the-bill-of-rights-originally-in-the-us-constitution-james-coll When you think of the US Constitution, what’s the first thing that comes to mind? Free speech? The right to bear arms? These passages are cited so often that it's hard to imagine the document without them. But the list of freedoms known as the Bill of Rights was not in the original text and wasn't added for three years. Why not? James Coll goes back to the origins of the Constitution to find out. Lesson by James Coll, animation by Augenblick Studios.
Views: 279869 TED-Ed
United States Constitution · Amendments · Bill of Rights · Complete Text + Audio
 
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Complete text & audio of the U.S. constitution and its amendments. Listen and read along. ► INTRODUCTION The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America. The Constitution, originally comprising seven articles, delineates the national frame of government. Its first three articles entrench the doctrine of the separation of powers, whereby the federal government is divided into three branches: the legislative, consisting of the bicameral Congress; the executive, consisting of the President; and the judicial, consisting of the Supreme Court and other federal courts. Articles Four, Five and Six entrench concepts of federalism, describing the rights and responsibilities of state governments and of the states in relationship to the federal government. Article Seven establishes the procedure subsequently used by the thirteen States to ratify it. Since the Constitution came into force in 1789, it has been amended twenty-seven times. In general, the first ten amendments, known collectively as the Bill of Rights, offer specific protections of individual liberty and justice and place restrictions on the powers of government. The majority of the seventeen later amendments expand individual civil rights protections. Others address issues related to federal authority or modify government processes and procedures. Amendments to the United States Constitution, unlike ones made to many constitutions world-wide, are appended to the end of the document. At seven articles and twenty-seven amendments, it is the shortest written constitution in force. All five pages of the original U.S. Constitution are written on parchment. The Constitution is interpreted, supplemented, and implemented by a large body of constitutional law. The Constitution of the United States is the first constitution of its kind, adopted by the people's representatives for an expansive nation; and it has influenced the constitutions of other nations. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Constitution ► INDEX (Click on time to jump to section) 01. Pmbl. 00:11 02. Art. I 00:49 03. Art. I § 1 00:56 04. Art. I § 2 01:16 05. Art. I § 3 04:06 06. Art. I § 4 07:08 07. Art. I § 5 07:53 08. Art. I § 6 09:24 09. Art. I § 7 10:41 10. Art. I § 8 13:15 11. Art. I § 9 17:10 12. Art. I § 10 19:26 13. Art. II 21:03 14. Art. II § 1 21:10 15. Art. II § 2 26:26 16. Art. II § 3 28:21 17. Art. II § 4 29:15 18. Art. III 29:39 19. Art. III § 1 29:46 20. Art. III § 2 30:27 21. Art. III § 3 32:24 22. Art. IV 33:10 23. Art. IV § 1 33:17 24. Art. IV § 2 33:47 25. Art. IV § 3 34:49 26. Art. IV § 4 35:47 27. Art. V 36:17 28. Art. VI 37:35 29. Art. VII 39:02 31. Amend. 1 39:34 32. Amend. 2 40:03 33. Amend. 3 40:24 34. Amend. 4 40:48 35. Amend. 5 41:22 36. Amend. 6 42:13 37. Amend. 7 42:57 38. Amend. 8 43:26 39. Amend. 9 43:47 40. Amend. 10 44:07 41. Amend. 11 44:30 42. Amend. 12 44:58 43. Amend. 13 47:28 44. Amend. 14 48:08 45. Amend. 15 51:25 46. Amend. 16 52:02 47. Amend. 17 52:27 48. Amend. 18 53:31 49. Amend. 19 54:41 50. Amend. 20 55:08 51. Amend. 21 57:54 52. Amend. 22 58:58 53. Amend. 23 01:00:10 54. Amend. 24 01:01:12 55. Amend. 25 01:01:58 56. Amend. 26 01:04:46 57. Amend. 27 01:05:23 58. Credits 01:05:56 ► TRANSLATION Translations to multiple languages are available as YouTube captions. They are far from perfect, but they can be useful in some situations. ____________________ Have you found this video helpful? Any comment or suggestion is welcome! Articles voice-over from voanews.com (public domain). Amendments voice-over by Michael Scherer, from librivox.org (public domain).
Views: 124827 feqwix
Federalism: Crash Course Government and Politics #4
 
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In which Craig Benzine teaches you about federalism, or the idea that in the United States, power is divided between the national government and the 50 state governments. Craig will teach you about how federalism has evolved over the history of the US, and what powers are given to the federal government, and what stuff the states control on their own. And he punches an eagle, which may not surprise you at all. Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Support is provided by Voqal: http://www.voqal.org Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Instagram - http://instagram.com/thecrashcourse
Views: 1538465 CrashCourse
State Power vs Federal Power - Lee, Jesse
 
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This is a short school video explaining states powers vs federal powers. Sources: "Articles of Confederation, 1777–1781 - 1776–1783 - Milestones - Office of the Historian." Articles of Confederation, 1777–1781 - 1776–1783 - Milestones - Office of the Historian. Web. 21 Oct. 2015. Daunt, Lesley. "State vs. Federal Law: Who Really Holds the Trump Card?" The Huffington Post. TheHuffingtonPost.com, 28 Nov. 2014. Web. 21 Oct. 2015. Demer, Lisa. "Alaska House Passes Bill Challenging Future Federal Gun Restrictions." Alaska Dispatch News. 25 Feb. 2013. Web. 21 Oct. 2015. Extension of Controlled Substances Act: Report. Washington: U.S. Govt. Print. Off., 1979. Print. "U.S. 21st Country to Allow Same-sex Marriage Nationwide - CNN Video." CNN. Cable News Network. Web. 21 Oct. 2015. Song: After Midnight by Maxim Kornyshev
Views: 5466 hidden channel
1.10 States' Rights and the Federal Govenment AP Gov
 
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LaMoney takes you through the modern limitations on federal power and the argument for states' rights.
Views: 987 Carey LaManna
National States' Rights Party | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: National States' Rights Party 00:00:10 1 Foundation 00:01:31 2 Development 00:03:23 2.1 Presidential tickets 00:03:32 3 Decline 00:04:21 4 Similar groups Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The National States' Rights Party was a far right, white supremacist party that briefly played a minor role in the politics of the United States.
Views: 9 wikipedia tts
Federalism and Battle of States rights
 
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Examine how federalism develped and compare it to other forms of government system. Outline over the battles and issues of that time and of today dealing with states vs federal powers, rights, and laws.
Views: 454 Leonard Rodenbur
Countermand Amendment, Article V Convention, States Rights affirmed and secured.
 
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Countermand Amendment. The final piece in the Article V Amendment Convention puzzle. States can Countermand and rescind any law or regulatory ruling that is burdensome to their citizens, businesses or Industries. States become partners in government, not subjects to Federal power. States can Countermand laws and regulatory rulings imposed on them by Congress, the Counts, Executive Branch and government agencies - Countermands will protect Federal infringements on: 1st Amendment, 2nd Amendment, 4th Amendment, 9th Amendment, 10th Amendment, Article IV, 4, State and private land seized by the government, federal deficits, federal debt, taxes, Healthcare, issues, Energy and mining issues, Land use restrictions, Local education issues, Social issues, pro life issues, Roe v. Wade,, Transportation issues, and more.
Views: 1448 Charles Kacprowicz
A 3-minute guide to the Bill of Rights - Belinda Stutzman
 
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View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/a-3-minute-guide-to-the-bill-of-rights-belinda-stutzman Daily, Americans exercise their rights secured by the Constitution. The most widely discussed and debated part of the Constitution is known as the Bill of Rights. Belinda Stutzman provides a refresher course on exactly what the first ten amendments grant each and every American citizen. Lesson by Belinda Stutzman, animation by Jacques Khouri.
Views: 765324 TED-Ed
States Rights Vs. Federal Rights And New Illegal Immigration Laws
 
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Article: http://news.yahoo.com/obama-administration-sues-block-alabama-immigration-law-211623335.html My Site: http://www.theawesomearchfiend.com/ Twitter: http://twitter.com/#!/TheArchfiend BlogTV and Chat Room: http://www.blogtv.com/People/thearchfiend Live show archive: http://www.blogtv.com/thearchfiend/Videos/viewAll/p/0/0 Longbox Tetris: http://www.theawesomearchfiend.com/apps/forums/topics/show/1175425-questions-for-longbox-tetris?page=1 Extra Videos: http://www.theawesomearchfiend.com/websitevideospage1.htm Message Board: http://www.theawesomearchfiend.com/apps/forums/
Views: 12058 TheArchfiend
Federalism: Is The 2nd Amendment A States Rights' Issue?
 
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Get the Federalist Papers HERE: http://www.amazon.com/dp/0451528816/ref=as_sl_pc_tf_lc?tag=valrid01-20 Get Trained HERE: http://www.valorridge.com/ Follow Reid on Facebook HERE: https://www.facebook.com/Reid-Henrichs-of-Valor-Ridge-811881388897208/ What happens when a state violates the Bill of Rights? Is it still covered under the 10th Amendment? Is the 2nd Amendment a states rights' issue? We address those points in this video.
Views: 20237 Reid Henrichs
The Bill of Rights-the first 10 Amendments
 
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Learn about the most popular Amendments to The Constitution. (1, 2, 4, 5, and 6th Amendments)
Views: 139879 PVHS Social Studies
States' rights | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: States' rights 00:00:31 1 Background 00:01:19 2 Text 00:02:32 3 Controversy to 1865 00:03:53 3.1 Alien and Sedition Acts 00:07:09 3.2 Nullification Crisis of 1832 00:09:17 3.3 Civil War 00:10:14 3.3.1 Southern arguments 00:11:44 3.3.2 Northern arguments 00:15:15 3.3.3 Texas v. White 00:15:54 4 Since the Civil War 00:16:35 4.1 In case law 00:18:05 4.2 Later progressive era and World War II 00:19:50 4.3 Civil rights movement 00:20:52 5 Contemporary debates 00:25:07 6 10th Amendment Resolutions 00:25:47 7 States' rights and the Rehnquist Court 00:28:57 8 States' rights as code word 00:30:54 9 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= In American political discourse, states' rights are political powers held for the state governments rather than the federal government according to the United States Constitution, reflecting especially the enumerated powers of Congress and the Tenth Amendment. The enumerated powers that are listed in the Constitution include exclusive federal powers, as well as concurrent powers that are shared with the states, and all of those powers are contrasted with the reserved powers—also called states' rights—that only the states possess.
Views: 2 wikipedia tts
The States' Rights Tradition Nobody Knows [Lecture 3] by Thomas Woods
 
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Thomas E. Woods, Jr., history professor at Suffolk Community College--and a prolific specialist in American Colonial history, the Progressive Era, and modern political history--presents this seminar covering the material in his books, and details and defends the Jeffersonian-Rothbardian perspective. Here is the cutting edge of libertarian history that completely rethinks the meaning and impact of the welfare-warfare state. Recorded at the Ludwig von Mises Institute in Auburn, Alabama; June 20-24, 2005. http://mises.org Link to the playlist for the complete 'The Truth About American History' seminar: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL7AA520F7F48777F9 Dr. Thomas E. Woods, Jr. is senior fellow in American history at the Ludwig von Mises Institute and is the author of nine books, including the New York Times bestsellers Meltdown: A Free-Market Look at Why the Stock Market Collapsed, the Economy Tanked, and Government Bailouts Will Make Things Worse, and The Politically Incorrect Guide to American History. His latest, Nullification: How to Resist Federal Tyranny in the 21st Century was released in July 2010. Thomas Woods' official website: http://www.thomasewoods.com Related links: http://mises.org/fellow.aspx?Id=23 http://mises.org/articles.aspx?AuthorId=424 http://mises.org/literature.aspx?action=author&Id=424 http://www.lewrockwell.com/woods/woods-arch.html DISCLAIMER: The Ludwig von Mises Institute has given permission under the Creative Commons license that this media presentation can be publicly reposted as long as credit is given to the Mises Institute and other guidelines are followed. More info at: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us/ This YouTube channel is in no way endorsed by or affiliated with the Ludwig von Mises Institute, any of its lecturers or staff members.
Views: 4821 LibertyInOurTime
By-passing Congress - States Call Article V Convention
 
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Sign up for FREE health Summit "The Truth About Cancer" https://cutt.ly/TheTruthAboutCancer Get your FREE Cannabis ebook at: http://www.gftracker.com/rd/r.php?sid=24&pub=310454 Learn how a simple gadget can double your gas mileage and save you thousand of dollars on gasoline at http://gadgetmangroove.com/?atid=78 or Call Ron Hatton for answers to your questions at 406-422-3291 (the website continues to have problems) - Use code "Sarah" and receive $50 OFF! See more of Lynn & Paul's work and use this link and code "Sarah" to receive an additional 15% discount on any purchase) https://plasmaenergysolution.com/?wpam_id=98 Dan Marks, leader of the Article V Convention process, joins the program to discuss the the Article V movement. He explains how the constitution explicitly gives states the right to call a convention to vote on new legislation, thus bypassing congress. The history of our country shows a long history of our federal government ignoring states rights. This movement aims to end the long practice of ignoring states rights. Dan Marks also stays for an additional segment for my Patreons. You can see this at http://Patreon.com/SarahWestall You can see more of Dan Mark's and his initiative at http://www.foavc.org/ Stay informed! Sign up for my newsletter at http://SarahWestall.com Thank you for listening and for supporting the show!
Views: 8945 Sarah Westall
The Power of States Rights Interview With Michael Boldin   Tenth Amendment Center
 
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The Power of States Rights Interview With Michael Boldin - Tenth Amendment Center Michael Boldin, executive director of the Tenth Amendment Center, talks about California's new law resisting NDAA indefinite detention. Mr. Boldin and Alex Jones discuss James Madison's advice on how to stop federal power -- including NSA spying -- and cover some of the recent developments in the 10th Amendment and Nullification movement around the country. Articles mentioned in the video are below: NULLIFORNIA: AB-351 Signed by Governor Brown, CA Won't Comply with NDAA Indefinite Detention - Article here: http://california.tenthamendmentcenter.com/2013/10/02/nullifornia-ab351/ Easton, KS Passes Ordinance to Nullify Federal Gun Control - Article here: http://blog.tenthamendmentcenter.com/2013/10/easton-ks-passes-ordinance-to-nullify-federal-gun-control/#.UlTL0RBq8uE California vs NDAA Indefinite Detention - Article here: http://blog.tenthamendmentcenter.com/2013/10/step-two-california-vs-ndaa-indefinite-detention/#.UlTMDRBq8uE You can follow the Tenth Amendment Center blog here: http://blog.tenthamendmentcenter.com/ http://youtu.be/tgBhaFeR2bE
Judge Andrew Napolitino discusses Federalism, The Constitution and States Rights
 
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Filling in for Beck, Judge Napolition discusses the growth of the Federal government, Federalism, our Constitution, state sovereignty, along with our rights for the nullification of unconstitutional laws. Guests are Kevin Gutzman and Thomas E. Woods, Jr, the authors of Who Killed the Constitution. Other books include The Politically Incorrect Guide to the Constitution and Meltdown
Views: 1467 SomePoliticalClips
11. Slavery and State Rights, Economies and Ways of Life: What Caused the Civil War?
 
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The Civil War and Reconstruction (HIST 119) Professor Blight begins this lecture with an attempt to answer the question "why did the South secede in 1861?" Blight offers five possible answers to this question: preservation of slavery, "the fear thesis," southern nationalism, the "agrarian thesis," and the "honor thesis." After laying out the roots of secession, Blight focuses on the historical profession, suggesting some of the ways in which historians have attempted to explain the coming of the Civil War. Blight begins with James Ford Rhodes, a highly influential amateur historian in the late 19th century, and then introduces Charles and Mary Beard, whose economic interpretations of the Civil War had their heyday in the 1920s and 1930s. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction: Jefferson Davis's Defense of Secession 08:24 - Chapter 2. Fear? Southern Unity? Why Did the South Seceded 20:46 - Chapter 3. Agrarian Society? Honor? Why the South Seceded, Continued 34:19 - Chapter 4. Historiography of the Civil War, from Rhodes to Beard 48:36 - Chapter 5. Conclusion Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses This course was recorded in Spring 2008.
Views: 83866 YaleCourses
Congress for Dummies -- Article 1 of the Constitution
 
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The second in the Constitution for Dummies series, in this lecture HipHughes takes you through Article I of the Constitution examining all ten sections outlining Legislative Powers. The Constitution Explained Series. 48 Videos, 6.5 Hours Long. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLi3U-nPPrbS5d-juhFwo3hTBso0gq2sUZ
Views: 185344 Hip Hughes
States Rights
 
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I wanted to pose a question regarding federal power vs states' rights.
Views: 227 GeneralSLee
States' Rights in Theory and Practice [Lecture 2] by Thomas Woods
 
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Thomas E. Woods, Jr., history professor at Suffolk Community College--and a prolific specialist in American Colonial history, the Progressive Era, and modern political history--presents this seminar covering the material in his books, and details and defends the Jeffersonian-Rothbardian perspective. Here is the cutting edge of libertarian history that completely rethinks the meaning and impact of the welfare-warfare state. Recorded at the Ludwig von Mises Institute in Auburn, Alabama; June 20-24, 2005. http://mises.org Link to the playlist for the complete 'The Truth About American History' seminar: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL7AA520F7F48777F9 Dr. Thomas E. Woods, Jr. is senior fellow in American history at the Ludwig von Mises Institute and is the author of nine books, including the New York Times bestsellers Meltdown: A Free-Market Look at Why the Stock Market Collapsed, the Economy Tanked, and Government Bailouts Will Make Things Worse, and The Politically Incorrect Guide to American History. His latest, Nullification: How to Resist Federal Tyranny in the 21st Century was released in July 2010. Thomas Woods' official website: http://www.thomasewoods.com Related links: http://mises.org/fellow.aspx?Id=23 http://mises.org/articles.aspx?AuthorId=424 http://mises.org/literature.aspx?action=author&Id=424 http://www.lewrockwell.com/woods/woods-arch.html DISCLAIMER: The Ludwig von Mises Institute has given permission under the Creative Commons license that this media presentation can be publicly reposted as long as credit is given to the Mises Institute and other guidelines are followed. More info at: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us/ This YouTube channel is in no way endorsed by or affiliated with the Ludwig von Mises Institute, any of its lecturers or staff members.
Views: 5105 LibertyInOurTime
States vs federal government in education reform — interview with Chris Minnich | VIEWPOINT
 
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As we move into a new era of federal policy on K-12 schools, AEI's Andy Smarick and NWEA's Chris Minnich reflect on how states saw the role of the federal government over the last two decades. FULL REPORT – The State Education Agency: At the helm, Not the Oar https://goo.gl/eH6dHi ARTICLE – The details of Every Student Succeeds Act plans may be less important than how they're created https://goo.gl/cnTYDF BOOK – Spinning Wheels: The Politics of Urban School Reform https://goo.gl/63pHwF Subscribe to AEI's YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/AEIVideos?sub_confirmation=1 Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AEIonline Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/AEI For more information http://www.aei.org Thumbnail photo credit: Reuters Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. AEI operates independently of any political party and does not take institutional positions on any issues. AEI scholars, fellows, and their guests frequently take positions on policy and other issues. When they do, they speak for themselves and not for AEI or its trustees or other scholars or employees. More information on AEI research integrity can be found here: http://www.aei.org/about/ #aei #news #politics #government #education #school #fed #state #federalism #localism
Congressman Johnson on States' Rights and Separation of Powers
 
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Congressman Johnson reminds his colleagues that Congress should adhere to the Constitutional principles of federalism and States' rights in rejecting federal infiltration in our civil justice system.
Views: 278 RepTimVJohnson
SMART REMARKS: States rights and wrongs
 
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States rights and wrongs View article at http://articles.lancasteronline.com/local/4/237297
Views: 111 LancasterOnline
California Bans NSA Spying Under States Rights 828
 
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go Cali! Strike a victory up for the 11th amendment and states rights
Views: 1685 morningmayan
Federal Supremacy vs. States' Rights (TNReport.com)
 
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Members if the Tennessee Senate Judiciary Committee debate a bill sponsored by Sen. Mae Beavers, R-Mt.Juliet, that would give state law enforcement officials authority to arrest federal agents executing gun laws declared unconstitutional by the state.
Views: 1421 tnreporttv
10th Amendment: States Rights and SB 1070
 
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This is a video that speaks about the 10th Amendment, using the recent new immigration law in Arizona (SB 1070) as an example of a state using this right. It also points to the problem with America's borders
Views: 992 geborenzuschaukeln
Medical Marijuana and State's Rights
 
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Eleven states have legalized some form of medical marijuana. However, the federal government is still arresting people for growing the plants - even when they are growing them for their state governments!
Views: 3690 angrygirl76
5 Types of Writs | Constitutional Remedies | Article 32 and Article 226
 
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In today's Video lets discuss 5 types of Writs: Habeas Corpus Mandamus Certiorari Prohibition Quo Warranto Fundamental Rights are properly protected the constitutional machinery, their Guarantee is safeguarded by Supreme Court and High Court. Generally there are 4 main protections provided for Fundamental Rights - Article 13, Article 359, Article 32 and 226. The Supreme Court and High Courts have wide power to issue Writs for the Protection of Fundamental Rights. The Video Discusses:- 1. Powers under Article 32 and Article 226 - and their differences 2. 5 Types of Writs 3. Important Case Laws Understanding the concept of Writs is very important for every Law Student. Its an important topic for any Competitive law Exam such as NET 2018, CLAT 2019, Judiciary and Indian Polity for UPSC Preparation. I hope this Video helps you in Understanding Law and Preparation for various exams - Kindly Subscribe to my Channel, So that you Stay Updated with all the Legal Topics, Current Affairs and Recent Cases See you in the Next Class! Thank You and Bye-Bye! Playlist for Jurisprudence - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vlijn... Playlist for Constitution - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ri-Ei... Instagram: @finologylegal
Views: 232550 Finology Legal
Supreme Court Says DOMA Might Violate States' Rights
 
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Justice Anthony Kennedy, widely seen as a "swing vote" in the case, saw a conflict between the federal law and state laws that permit gay marriage.
Views: 120 Newsy Politics
Reece Hrizuk YouTube Question - States' Rights
 
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Reece Hrizuk - Corvallis, OR Federal government vs. States' rights.
COUNTERMAND AMENDMENT the Missing Piece in the Article V Puzzle
 
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COUNTERMAND AMENDMENT the Missing Piece in the Article V Puzzle video. We can restore our Constitutional Republic and States Rights under Article V, through State Legislatures and without the consent of Congress, the Courts or the Executive Branch.
Views: 814 Charles Kacprowicz
Causes of Southern Secession: An Essay
 
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In an ongoing debate about the causes of the Southern Secession that preceded the American Civil War of 1861 to 1865, three different narratives have presented themselves: The Slavery Narrative, the States' Rights Narrative, and the Lost Cause Narrative. This essay goes over the most important aspects of each of them, explores the initial roots of the Lost Cause with an interpretation of the works of Edward Alfred Pollard and then segways into an evaluation of the arguments brought forth between the principle of States' Rights and the particular policy that was Slavery. The creator allows himself a personal conclusion on which of the three narratives beats the other two, but invites any and all commenters to offer their own thoughts in the comment section below. SOURCES - Burt, John (2013). Lincoln's Tragic Pragmatism: Lincoln, Douglas and Moral Conflict. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press. - Daley, Jason (2018). "Texas Will Finally Teach That Slavery Was Main Cause of the Civil War". Smithsonian.com. Retrieved 2019-01-14. - Davis, Jefferson (1881). The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government. - Government of the Confederate States (1862). Constitution of the Confederate States of America. - Government of the United States (1776). United States Constitution. - King, Connor (2013). Lost Cause Textbooks: Civil War Education in the South from the 1890s to the 1920s. Oxford, Mississippi: University of Mississippi. Approved by Professors Holm, April; McKee, Kathryn. - Mason, Matthew (2006). Slavery and Politics in the Early American Republic. - Pollard, Edward Alfred (1866). The Lost Cause: A New History of the War of the Confederates. New York: E.B. Treat and Co., Publishers. - State Archives of Florida, Series 577, Carton 1, Folder 6, “Gov. Madison Starke Perry – Constitutional Convention 1861" (1861). Florida Declaration of Causes (undated and untitled). Retrieved 2019-01-16. - State Government of Alabama (1861). Alabama Ordinance of Secession. - State Government of Mississippi (1861). A Declaration of the Immediate Causes which Induce and Justify the Secession of the State of Mississippi from the Federal Union. - State Government of South Carolina (1860). Declaration of the Immediate Causes Which Induce and Justify the Secession of South Carolina from the Federal Union. - State Government of Texas (1861). A Declaration of the Causes which Impel the State of Texas to Secede from the Federal Union. - Stephens, Alexander H (1861). “Corner Stone Speech". Savannah, Georgia. 21 March 1861. Music used: - Alex M: "Asiatic Country Theme" - Alex M: "Millennium Dawn" - Alex M: "Mother Russia" - Järpehag, Jonatan: "Jonny Comes Marching Home" - Lucille Hegamin And The Dixie Daisies: "Cold Winter Blues" - Pietro: "You'll find old Dixieland in France"
Views: 323 Ted52
The Bundy Ranch, The Facts, The Fiction & States Rights  26April2014
 
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http://www.thevinnyeastwoodshow.com/1/post/2014/04/26-april-2014-the-bundy-ranch-facts-fiction-states-rights-explained-susanne-posel-vinny-eastwood.html SUSANNE POSEL http://www.theusindependent.com/ http://www.occupycorporatism.com/ VINNY EASTWOOD http://www.thevinnyeastwoodshow.com/ http://www.youtube.com/mrnewsguerillamedia http://www.realguerillamedia.com/ This is a story about madness, it's crazy that people are sticking up for Bundy when he's not being honest, It's even crazier that the Government is trying to steal peoples land and livestock under agenda 21, it's absolutely nuts that an alternative media mob is using this as an opportunity to jump start a domestic insurrection against the largest, most ruthless, technologically advanced military machine on earth. Who's crazier? THE BUNDY RANCH The Bundy ranch is a 160 acre ranch in Nevada, Cliven Bundy was allowed to graze his cattle on public land in that area, Claiming that since 1877 his family has been doing so, when they only got there in 1954 of course -The BLM Bundy lost 4 cases and been fighting the BLM in court for 20 years In 2009 the court gave the BLM an order to seize the cattle if they were grazing on public land and they waited until now to seize them, taking 150 animals, allegedly burying some of them on the public land after a number supposedly died in transit due to the loving tender care the BLM provided them. -Agenda 21 4 years ago the Obama administration allowed 220 million acres of public land to go into the wildlands project, the BLM was to manage, oversee and look for new areas to steal. Some of the states they were looking at were: • Colorado • Utah • New Mexico • California • Arizona • Oregon • Washington State • Nevada -States Rights The public land Bundy is grazing cattle on is under federal jurisdiction because Nevada's constitution had given up state sovereignty to the Federal Government since 1864. Bundy had attempted to pay for the grazing directly to the Nevada state government, despite the fact that they have no jurisdiction whatsoever, this might be the reason why he lost 4 cases in a row and took 20 years to do so. Those are the facts outlining the case, but what are the alternative media reporting? A video surfaced of BLM thugs tazering and setting dogs upon protestors that were supporting the Bundy Ranch's struggle, this has resulted in an alternative media feeding frenzy, fear mongering & calls to gather an enormous posse of militia to the ranch. Former Sheriff Mack recommended putting women on the front lines, even his own wife and daughter, so if the BLM started shooting, dead women would be all over the news. It's been reported that Senator Harry Reid is intensely involved in the situation, as he has an interest in putting up a solar farm on the land Bundy won't be allowed to graze on. Except, it was his son that was providing legal representation to a chinese solar panel company and that deal fell through in 2013 anyway. It's also been reported that this is part of an agenda to start hydraulic fracturing or "fracking" in the area, when documents prove that the franking consents are for eastern Nevada, when the Bundy Ranch is on the other side of the state in western Nevada. The alternative media has compared Cliven Bundy to iconic civil rights symbol Rosa Parkes, saying that there's a correlation between her struggle for civil rights and his, Cliven Bundy was later quoted as saying "I want to tell you one more thing I know about the Negro... They abort their young children, they put their young men in jail, because they never learned how to pick cotton... And I've often wondered, are they better off as slaves," Regardless, it's not a civil rights issue, but a states rights issue to begin with. SOLUTIONS So now that you know that nearly everything the government does is evil, nearly everything the alternative and mainstream media report is BS, what is the solution to this debacle? For starters, let's make this a states rights issue, as it properly should be, amending the Nevada state constitution article 2 section 1 so that jurisdiction over Nevada land will be subject to real property laws determined by the state itself and not the federal government. SOURCES: https://theusindependent.com/prevent-bundy-bloodshed-resist-defund-dig-in-defend/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2NwCYZpI83c http://www.occupycorporatism.com/home/bundy-ranch-red-river-states-rights-federal-land-grabs-explained/ www.thevinnyeastwoodshow.com
Views: 1598 Vinny Eastwood
ALL 27 AMENDMENTS (in four minutes)
 
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APUSH Test Stress? Check out our full review, here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QXrBNizn7PI How it Happened US History ALL 27 CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS! IN LESS THAN FIVE MINUTES! Basic notes on what each of the US Constitution's 27 amendments did.
Views: 246760 How it Happens
Lecture Notes: Articles of the Confederation to the Constitution
 
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analyze the development of American Constitutional government, explaining its relationship to the Enlightenment, and describe how the early national leaders implemented the new government (GPS) (SSUH_D2007-34) 34a - explain how weaknesses in the Articles of Confederation (no Executive branch, no taxation, no national currency, and no regulation of interstate commerce) and Daniel Shays' Rebellion led to a call for a stronger central government, 34b - explain the key features of the Constitution, specifically, the Great Compromise, separation of powers, limited government, and the issue of slavery (3/5 Compromise) and connect them to the ideas of the Enlightenment, 34c - evaluate the major arguments of the anti-Federalists and Federalists during the debate on ratification of the Constitution put forth in the Federalists Papers concerning form of government, factions, checks and balances, and the power of the executive, including the roles of Alexander Hamilton and James Madison, 34d - analyze how the Bill of Rights serves as a protector of individual and states rights,
Views: 2776 CoachBakerOnline
US Regents Review: Video #16: States’ Rights  The VA and KY Resolutions
 
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What were the VA & KY Resolutions? What occurred during the Nullification Crisis? Find out here! If you would like to use the PowerPoint/Video Guide used in the video, click here: All images are part of the public domain
Views: 216 Adam Norris