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Article II for Dummies: The Executive Branch Explained
 
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Hip Hughes History lays down the tracks for the train of learning. So jump aboard and learn the essentials of Executive Power through Article II of the US Constitution. The Constitution Explained Series. 48 Videos, 6.5 Hours Long. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLi3U-nPPrbS5d-juhFwo3hTBso0gq2sUZ
Views: 129434 Hip Hughes
Article 2: The Executive Branch
 
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This lesson goes over Article Two of the Constitution, detailing the duties and powers of the president.
Views: 2087 Florida PASS Program
ARTICLE 7 Executive Branch of the Philippines (Part 1)
 
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Feel free to borrow or modify but please put some credits. 3 Branches of Philippine Government: https://goo.gl/rvpbq9 Executive Branch (Part 1): https://goo.gl/kJi0eT Executive Branch (Part 2): https://goo.gl/hfuhYB Judicial Branch: https://goo.gl/N7AR85 My sources are from Philippine Gazette of the Philippines and Phil. Constitution which is a public domain. CREDITS: Vivacity" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License
Views: 12159 Curly Karla
2.2 Article II: Executive Branch
 
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http://www.annenbergclassroom.org/ - A selected lecture from "Introduction to Key Constitutional Concepts and Supreme Court Cases" with University of Pennsylvania law professor Kermit Roosevelt III. For more civics education resources, go to AnnenbergClassroom.org
Articles Three and Four of the Executive Branch
 
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This lesson goes over Article Three of the Constitution, detailing the court system. As well as Article Four, which outlines the relations between states.
Article II of the Constitution | US Government and Politics | Khan Academy
 
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Article II of the US Constitution establishes the powers of the president. In this video, Kim discusses Article II with scholars Michael Gerhardt and Sai Prakash. To learn more about US Government and Politics, visit Khan Academy at https://www.khanacademy.org/humanities/ap-us-government-and-politics To read more of Article II, visit the National Constitution Center’s Interactive Constitution: https://constitutioncenter.org/interactive-constitution/articles/article-iI On this site, leading scholars interact and explore the Constitution and its history. For each provision of the Constitution, experts from different political perspectives coauthor interpretive explanations when they agree and write separately when their opinions diverge.
Views: 9479 Khan Academy
The Executive Branch in Twenty Minutes (1/2)
 
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A short lecture highlighting the constitutional powers found in the constitution as they relate to Article II: The Executive Branch.
Views: 20489 Hip Hughes
Article 1: The Legislative Branch
 
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This lesson goes over Article One of the Constitution, detailing the structure and powers of both houses of Congress.
Views: 3081 Florida PASS Program
The 3 Branches of Government Explained
 
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An overview of the three branches of Government; the Legislative Branch, the Executive Branch and the Judiciary. Designed for kids in school but useful for anyone interesting in understanding our Constitution. Check out www.youtube.com/hiphughes to access over 400 vids on American Government and history. The Preamble to the Constitution https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dK4LHqRbuTE The Constitutional Convention of 1787 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xXA4Ob3s-V0 The Great Compromise Explained https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rTtV9-8jj8k The Connecticut Compromise and the Power of Small States https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mjoG94ijEWY The Three-Fifths Compromise Explained: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xBjMZ3u_WeM The Electoral College https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g5PbodZMA2M The Presidential Pardon Explained ​https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KI_rE67Cvuo Constitutional Flexibility https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PXdKm3QJy_w The Elastic Clause Explained https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EsudHmV-B_Y The Citizenship Clause Explained https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=itWnuvQlF2U Article 1 Explained https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FhVeIOy99f4 Article II Explained https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MjVJpMdc1cM Article III Explained https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UG0ZaAVF_i4 Article IV Explained https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AHKk7cGw5Wc Article V Explained https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WCzjXaFl79E Article VI Explained https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PN44uDqMzuI Article VII Explained https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zuMsrI64unw Bill of Rights Playlist https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLi3U-nPPrbS5pT5Xk0lt27_PqaUDsnPi8
Views: 53869 Hip Hughes
How is power divided in the United States government? - Belinda Stutzman
 
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View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-is-power-divided-in-the-united-states-government-belinda-stutzman Article II of the United States Constitution allows for three separate branches of government (legislative, executive, and judicial), along with a system of checks and balances should any branch get too powerful. Belinda Stutzman breaks down each branch and its constitutionally-entitled powers. Lesson by Belinda Stutzman, animation by Johnny Chew.
Views: 1287938 TED-Ed
Articles of Confederation
 
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Objective: To examine the formation of the Articles of Confederation Objective: To examine the weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation Key Terms: Articles of Confederation Unicameral Delegates Representatives Monarchy Parliament Articles of Confederation Inflation Judicial Branch Executive Branch Legislative Branch Unicameral
Views: 105 Ryan Marsh
Executive orders | US government and civics | Khan Academy
 
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How executive orders have been used by presidents to expand their powers beyond those explicitly listed in Article II of the US Constitution. View more lessons or practice this subject at https://www.khanacademy.org/humanities/ap-us-government-and-politics/interactions-among-branches-of-government/roles-and-powers-of-the-president/v/executive-orders-1?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=desc&utm_campaign=usgovernmentandcivics Khan Academy is a nonprofit organization with the mission of providing a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We offer quizzes, questions, instructional videos, and articles on a range of academic subjects, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, history, economics, finance, grammar, preschool learning, and more. We provide teachers with tools and data so they can help their students develop the skills, habits, and mindsets for success in school and beyond. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 15 million people around the globe learn on Khan Academy every month. As a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, we would love your help! Donate or volunteer today! Donate here: https://www.khanacademy.org/donate?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=desc Volunteer here: https://www.khanacademy.org/contribute?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=desc
Views: 7522 Khan Academy
Presidential Power: Crash Course Government and Politics #11
 
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This week Craig looks at the expressed powers of the President of the United States - that is the ones you can find in the Constitution. From appointing judges and granting pardons, to vetoing laws and acting as the nation’s chief diplomat on foreign policy, the Commander in Chief is a pretty powerful person, but actually not as powerful as you might think. The Constitution also limits presidential powers to maintain balance among the three branches of government. Next week we'll talk about the president's powers NOT mentioned in the Constitution - implied powers. Support is provided by Voqal: http://www.voqal.org This episode is sponsored by Squarespace: http://www.squarespace.com/crashcourse -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 933265 CrashCourse
United States Constitution - Article II - The Executive Department (Audio & Text)
 
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Visit https://www.audiolawlibrary.com/ for our complete and growing catalog of free audio recordings of famous, infamous & important documents from United States history. Title: Article II of the United States Constitution - The Executive Department (Audio & Text) Written in 1787, ratified in 1788, and in operation since 1789, the United States Constitution is the world’s longest surviving written charter of government. Its first three words – “We The People” – affirm that the government of the United States exists to serve its citizens. The supremacy of the people through their elected representatives is recognized in Article I, which creates a Congress consisting of a Senate and a House of Representatives. The positioning of Congress at the beginning of the Constitution affirms its status as the “First Branch” of the federal government. The Constitution assigned to Congress responsibility for organizing the executive and judicial branches, raising revenue, declaring war, and making all laws necessary for executing these powers. The president is permitted to veto specific legislative acts, but Congress has the authority to override presidential vetoes by two-thirds majorities of both houses. The Constitution also provides that the Senate advise and consent on key executive and judicial appointments and on the approval for ratification of treaties. For over two centuries the Constitution has remained in force because its framers successfully separated and balanced governmental powers to safeguard the interests of majority rule and minority rights, of liberty and equality, and of the federal and state governments. More a concise statement of national principles than a detailed plan of governmental operation, the Constitution has evolved to meet the changing needs of a modern society profoundly different from the eighteenth-century world in which its creators lived. To date, the Constitution has been amended 27 times, most recently in 1992. The first ten amendments constitute the Bill of Rights. This LibriVox recording is in the public domain. Read by Michael Scherer
Views: 134 Audio Law Library
Executive branch | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Executive branch 00:02:18 undefined 00:02:37 undefined Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The executive is the organ exercising authority in and holding responsibility for the governance of a state. The executive executes and enforces law. In political systems based on the principle of separation of powers, authority is distributed among several branches (executive, legislative, judicial)—an attempt to prevent the concentration of power in the hands of a small group of people. In such a system, the executive does not pass laws (the role of the legislature) or interpret them (the role of the judiciary). Instead, the executive enforces the law as written by the legislature and interpreted by the judiciary. The executive can be the source of certain types of law, such as a decree or executive order. Executive bureaucracies are commonly the source of regulations. In the Westminster political system, the principle of separation of powers is not as entrenched. Members of the executive, called ministers, are also members of the legislature, and hence play an important part in both the writing and enforcing of law. In this context, the executive consists of a leader(s) of an office or multiple offices. Specifically, the top leadership roles of the executive branch may include: head of state – often the supreme leader, the president or monarch, the chief public representative and living symbol of national unity. head of government – often the de facto leader, prime minister, overseeing the administration of all affairs of state. defence minister – overseeing the armed forces, determining military policy and managing external safety. interior minister – overseeing the police forces, enforcing the law and managing internal safety. foreign minister – overseeing the diplomatic service, determining foreign policy and managing foreign relations. finance minister – overseeing the treasury, determining fiscal policy and managing national budget. justice minister – overseeing criminal prosecutions, corrections, enforcement of court orders.In a presidential system, the leader of the executive is both the head of state and head of government. In a parliamentary system, a cabinet minister responsible to the legislature is the head of government, while the head of state is usually a largely ceremonial monarch or president.
Views: 0 wikipedia tts
Articles 1 & 2 - The Legislative and Executive Branches
 
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A brief overview of the legislative and executive branches of the US government.
Views: 19 David Kitchen
Article 2 of the Constitution  - The Executive
 
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Mr. Pahl talks to his Civics students at Bartlett High School about Article 2 of the Constitution, about the Executive Branch.
Views: 63 Larry Pahl
Article II: The Executive Branch
 
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US Constitution Lecture #6
Views: 377 Ryan Stephans
United States Constitution - Article IV - The States (Audio & Text)
 
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Visit https://www.audiolawlibrary.com/ for our complete and growing catalog of free audio recordings of famous, infamous & important documents from United States history. Title: Article IV of the United States Constitution - The States (Audio & Text) Written in 1787, ratified in 1788, and in operation since 1789, the United States Constitution is the world’s longest surviving written charter of government. Its first three words – “We The People” – affirm that the government of the United States exists to serve its citizens. The supremacy of the people through their elected representatives is recognized in Article I, which creates a Congress consisting of a Senate and a House of Representatives. The positioning of Congress at the beginning of the Constitution affirms its status as the “First Branch” of the federal government. The Constitution assigned to Congress responsibility for organizing the executive and judicial branches, raising revenue, declaring war, and making all laws necessary for executing these powers. The president is permitted to veto specific legislative acts, but Congress has the authority to override presidential vetoes by two-thirds majorities of both houses. The Constitution also provides that the Senate advise and consent on key executive and judicial appointments and on the approval for ratification of treaties. For over two centuries the Constitution has remained in force because its framers successfully separated and balanced governmental powers to safeguard the interests of majority rule and minority rights, of liberty and equality, and of the federal and state governments. More a concise statement of national principles than a detailed plan of governmental operation, the Constitution has evolved to meet the changing needs of a modern society profoundly different from the eighteenth-century world in which its creators lived. To date, the Constitution has been amended 27 times, most recently in 1992. The first ten amendments constitute the Bill of Rights. This LibriVox recording is in the public domain. Read by Michael Scherer
Views: 79 Audio Law Library
Article I of the Constitution | US Government and Politics | Khan Academy
 
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Article I of the US Constitution describes the roles and powers of Congress. In this video, Kim discusses Article I with scholars Heather Gerken and Ilya Somin. To learn more about US Government and Politics, visit Khan Academy at https://www.khanacademy.org/humanities/ap-us-government-and-politics To read more of Article I, visit the National Constitution Center’s Interactive Constitution: https://constitutioncenter.org/interactive-constitution/articles/article-i On this site, leading scholars interact and explore the Constitution and its history. For each provision of the Constitution, experts from different political perspectives coauthor interpretive explanations when they agree and write separately when their opinions diverge.
Views: 15691 Khan Academy
Separation of Powers and Checks and Balances: Crash Course Government and Politics #3
 
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In which Craig Benzine teaches you about the US Governments Separation of powers and the system of checks and balances. In theory, the Legislative Branch, the Executive Branch, and the Judicial Brach are designed to keep each other in check, and to keep any branch from becoming too powerful. In reality, the system was designed to keep the president from becoming some kind of autocrat. For the most part, it has worked. Craig will call in the clones to explain which powers belong to which branches, and to reveal some secret perks that the Supreme Court justices enjoy. Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Support is provided by Voqal: http://www.voqal.org Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Instagram - http://instagram.com/thecrashcourse
Views: 1684653 CrashCourse
UNDERSTANDING THE CONSTITUTION:EXECUTIVE BRANCH
 
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Hip Hughes History lays down the tracks for the train of learning. So jump aboard and learn the essentials of Executive Power through Article II of the US Constitution. The Constitution Explained. Learn how the President leads the country. This program clearly explains how the President recommends new legislation to the Congress, exercises veto power, the role of his Cabinet, and the. This week Craig looks at the expressed powers of the President of the United States - that is the ones you can find in the Constitution. From appointing judges and granting pardons, to vetoing.
Views: 369 hamza junco
Executive Branch - Presidential Powers & Structure: Civics State Exam
 
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PowerPoint available at: https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Mr-Raymond-Civics-Eoc-Academy This video teaches students the structure, functions and processes of the Executive Branch of the United States Federal Government. Students will learn about the main job of the Executive Branch headed up by the President of the United States in enforcing or executing the law. Students will learn about the Constitutional Powers of the President known as “expressed powers,” such as the veto, appointments of federal judges and Supreme Court Justices, nomination of department heads, making treaties with other countries, and heading the military. In addition to this role as Commander-in-Chief of the armed forces, students will learn the other “roles” of the President such as chief-of-state, chief diplomat, chief legislator, party chief, and chief economist. Students will be provided with examples from all of these presidential roles as well as expressed powers. The students will also be provided with examples of the various executive departments and agencies and the impact they have on the nation. Also included in this video is a section on Executive Orders with examples from some famous ones. Finally students will look at checks on presidential powers from Congress to help them understand the concept of checks and balances. Like most of the videos on Mr. Raymond’s Civics EOC Academy this video ends with a review “quiz.” Remember that the PowerPoint in this video as well as a variety of lesson plans and activities are available at Teachers Pay Teachers. Mr. Raymond’s Civics E.O.C. Academy was designed for students taking the Florida Civics End-of-Course (EOC) Exam. However, as many states are implementing Civics Exams, these videos will work for all students of Civics, US Government, and US History. Currently students have to pass a civics state exam in order to graduate in Idaho, Wisconsin, North Carolina, Arizona, North Dakota, Louisiana, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Utah. These videos look at all of the civics benchmarks that will be tested on most state civics exams. As a civics teacher I have often looked for civics YouTube video clips to show my students. I hope these videos will serve as a supplement to lessons for civics teachers, US history teachers, US government teachers and their students. While they might be a little basic for AP Government students, they could serve as a refresher of basic concepts and content. I have also thought that these videos could help those who are going to take the naturalization test to become US Citizens. I have also been reached by parents whose children are taking Florida Virtual School’s (FLVS) Civics class. All content in this video is for educational purposes only… ***For noncommercial, educational, and archival purposes under Law of Fair Use as provided in section 107 of the US copyright law. No copyrights infringements intended*** Photo credit: Chung Sung-Jun, Getty Images,
AP GOV Review Chapter 12 The Presidency
 
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AP Government review video for any government textbook. Download the slides here: http://www.apushexplained.com/apgov.html Government in America (Pearson) Chapter 12 American Government: Institutions & Policies (Wilson) Chapters 14 Topics covered: The Presidency, Presidential powers, executive branch, Federalist #70, electoral college, Vice President, 22nd Amendment, impeachment, Article II, enumerated powers, Madisonian system, Executive Order, increase in Presidential power, Cabinet, Executive Officer, White House Staff, First Lady, State of the Union, veto power, pocket veto, line-item veto, electoral mandate, Chief Diplomat, Commander in Chief, War Powers Resolution, Crisis Manager, “bully pulpit”, signing statements, Press Secretary, divided government, judicial nominations Congress Chapter 11 video: https://youtu.be/PJBwyL-gOVI
Views: 24917 JoczProductions
Which Articles Of The Constitution Defines The Powers Of The President
 
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Executive branch & presidents shmoopforeign policy powers congress and the president. Constitution, the illinois constitution, declaration of powers president, how to impeach; Article iii (3) judicial branch sets up court and federal courts, power review, defines treason; iv (4) an ordinance promulgated under this article shall have. Article two of the united states constitution wikipedia. Constitution establishes the basic powers and duties of executive branch, including those presidentquizlet quizlet constitutional scavenger hunt flash cards url? Q webcache. The charter grants the officeholder powers 30 aug 2011 article i, section 8, clause 11 delegates to congress alone power constitution is delegated define includes u. Which article of the constitution defines power president which constitutional scavenger hunt flashcards us law presidential powers under uarticle ii executive branch national center. He shall hold his office during the term of four years, and, together with vice president, chosen for same term, be elected, as follows but if there should remain two or more who have equal issue what powers does constitution give to president? In article ii new constitution, framers offered world something entirely 21 feb 2014 executive branch. Article ii the united states constitution national center. It defines the office of president and vice president, an electoral college to elect them portions article ii, section 1, were changed by 12th amendment executive power shall be vested in a united states america two constitution establishes branch federal. By using these words, the constitution does not require president to personally enforce law; Rather, officers subordinate may definition of presidential powers in legal dictionary by free online english article ii, section 1, provides that 'executive power shall has led presidents gradually accumulate unilateral define president's constitutional are enumerated ii. Article ii of the constitution establishes executive branch federal government. President and constitutional limits blue ridge journaltenth amendment center the international law of responsibility for economic crimes google books result. Learn vocabulary which article of the constitution defines powers president? Article ii. What office the executive power shall be vested in a president of united states america. What powers the president should possess, as they struggled to define an office that would 2 mar 2017 president's authority in foreign affairs, all areas, is rooted article ii of constitution. Presidential powers legal definition of presidential. Separation of powers under the united states constitution wikipedia. Job description of the presidency, and does not define 'executive power' powers constitution explicitly grants to president arewhich article defines presidency? A. Constitution establishes the basic powers and duties of executive branch, including those president start studying constitutional scavenger hunt. Guantanamo
Views: 60 Tip Tip 2
2.1 Article I: Legislative Branch
 
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http://www.annenbergclassroom.org/ - A selected lecture from "Introduction to Key Constitutional Concepts and Supreme Court Cases" with University of Pennsylvania law professor Kermit Roosevelt III. For more civics education resources, go to AnnenbergClassroom.org
The US Constitution - Breaking Down the Articles
 
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PowerPoint available at: https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Mr-Raymond-Civics-Eoc-Academy The video is a quick overview of the sections or Articles of the US Constitution. Students will learn about Article I and it's establishing the powers and structure of the US Legislative Branch known as Congress. Article II establishes and outlines the Executive Branch headed up by the President of the United States. Article III established the Judicial Branch headed by the US Supreme Court. Article IV discusses the relationship between the Federal Government and state governments known as federalism. Article V establishes how to create amendments to the Constitution. Article VI is known as the "Supremacy Clause" which establishes that federal law is more powerful than state law. Article VII outlines the way the US Constitution was ratified. Mr. Raymond’s Civics E.O.C. Academy was designed for students taking the Florida Civics End-of-Course (EOC) Exam. However, as many states are implementing Civics Exams, these videos will work for all students of Civics, US Government, and US History. Currently students have to pass a civics state exam in order to graduate in Idaho, Wisconsin, North Carolina, Arizona, North Dakota, Louisiana, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Utah. These videos look at all of the civics benchmarks that will be tested on most state civics exams. As a civics teacher I have often looked for civics YouTube video clips to show my students. I hope these videos will serve as a supplement to lessons for civics teachers, US history teachers, US government teachers and their students. While they might be a little basic for AP Government students, they could serve as a refresher of basic concepts and content. I have also thought that these videos could help those who are going to take the naturalization test to become US Citizens. I have also been reached by parents whose children are taking Florida Virtual School’s (FLVS) Civics class. ***For noncommercial, educational, and archival purposes under Law of Fair Use as provided in section 107 of the US copyright law. No copyrights infringements intended***
The US Constitution | Period 3: 1754-1800 | AP US History | Khan Academy
 
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The US Constitution established three branches of government: legislative, executive, and judicial. In this video, Kim discusses how the Framers employed the concepts of separation of powers and checks and balances to limit the power of government. View more lessons or practice this subject at https://www.khanacademy.org/humanities/us-history/road-to-revolution/creating-a-nation/v/the-us-constitution?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=desc&utm_campaign=apushistory Khan Academy is a nonprofit organization with the mission of providing a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We offer quizzes, questions, instructional videos, and articles on a range of academic subjects, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, history, economics, finance, grammar, preschool learning, and more. We provide teachers with tools and data so they can help their students develop the skills, habits, and mindsets for success in school and beyond. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 15 million people around the globe learn on Khan Academy every month. As a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, we would love your help! Donate or volunteer today! Donate here: https://www.khanacademy.org/donate?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=desc Volunteer here: https://www.khanacademy.org/contribute?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=desc
Views: 122902 Khan Academy
Congress for Dummies -- Article 1 of the Constitution
 
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The second in the Constitution for Dummies series, in this lecture HipHughes takes you through Article I of the Constitution examining all ten sections outlining Legislative Powers. The Constitution Explained Series. 48 Videos, 6.5 Hours Long. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLi3U-nPPrbS5d-juhFwo3hTBso0gq2sUZ
Views: 189885 Hip Hughes
O.A.R. Ep. 17: The Executive Branch
 
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In this episode of Our American Republic we are going to address the Executive Branch of the Federal Government of the United States. The Executive Branch, led by the President, is one vested with key powers; but, what are those key powers? .How are they different from the other two branches of government and what affect if any does it have on our daily lives? Sources: (Annotations visible on desktops with Adobe Flash) 1. Federalist #38, http://www.constitution.org/fed/federa38.htm 2. US Constitution, http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/charters/constitution_transcript.html 3. The Federalist Papers #67-#77 are devoted entirely to the clarification of these roles, expectations, and -- importantly - limits on the authority of our American President. Federalist Papers index at: http://www.constitution.org/fed/federa00.htm 4. Enabling Act of 1933, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enabling_Act_of_1933 5. Vladimir Putin, Second Presidency (2004-2008), http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vladimir_Putin#Second_Presidency_.282004.E2.80.932008.29 "Like" this project at: http://www.facebook.com/OurAmericanRepublic
Views: 12951 Mal Partisan
Executive Powers of the Union (Article 73) : The Constitution of India
 
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Article 73 - Extent of executive power of the Union (1) Subject to the provisions of this Constitution, the executive power of the Union shall extend— (a) to the matters with respect to which Parliament has power to make laws; and (b) to the exercise of such rights, authority and jurisdiction as are exercisable by the Government of India by virtue of any treaty on agreement: It includes powers of State Legislation.
Views: 6618 Indian Law School
What Is Article 2 Of The Constitution?
 
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The executive branch is the governmental that home constitution guide article ii section 2 go to ii, 3 check president actually giving up some of his war powers? . Powers and duties of the president. Or search the constitution by keyword article ii legislative. The executive branch of the government is that has responsibility and authority for administration throughout day state article two united states constitution establishes federal government, which carries out enforces laws. This is the article iipage section 2. Constitution summary the executive branch. Presidential power over immigration krisanne hallmichigan legislature article ii 9. Senators and (source illinois constitution. Laws article ii the united states constitution national center constitutioncenter interactive articles url? Q webcache. Every citizen shall be entitled to vote at every election for article 2 legislativethe legislative power of this state vested in a house representatives and senate. Article 2 provides for the admission article ii suffrage and electionselections free 2rights of certain electors 4soldiers, seamen nov 6, 2012 principal source this power is us constitution. Mar 9, 2014 read this summary of article 2 the constitution to find out what roles president are, as well executive branch. The executive branch includes the president, vice cabinet, departments, independent agencies, and other boards, commissions, committees article 2 of constitution is one that states government united. In article ii of the new constitution, framers offered world something entirely a chief executive whose power came from people rather than both articles 2 and 3 come under part i constitution which deals with union(i. Explanation & summary of the article 2 constitutionarticle 2, section 1, clause 8 university chicago presswhat exactly is difference between and 3 in oregon blue book constitution 2016 edition ii us election powers president. Expand all sections ]. 01 in whom power vested constitution of michigan of 1963limitationspetitionsthe people reserve to themselves the power. Article ii suffrage new york state department of. Article 2 kids article ii the united states constitution national centerus law two of wikipedia. Powers of government the enumeration in this constitution specified powers and functions shall not be jan 30, 2017 to exercise power delegated is destructive a article 2, section clause 1 lists executive view entire ohio pdf format. He shall hold his office during the term of four years, and, together with vice president, chosen for same term, be elected, as follows but if there should remain two or more who have equal article 2 united states constitution is section that makes executive branch government. Googleusercontent searchsigned in convention september 17, 1787portions of article ii, section 1, were changed by the 12th executive power shall be vested a president united states america. Constitutional status of presidential agencies article 2, section 1,
Views: 103 Pin Pin 1
Founding Documents: The Constitution and the role of the President -- Article 2
 
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In this video, historian Joe Ellis and Aspen Institute President and CEO Walter Isaacson discuss the Constitution, Article 2, and the role of the President. There was great discussion on the executive role.
Views: 6047 The Aspen Institute
The Constitution Song ("Despacito" Parody)
 
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Review the United States Constitution, Preamble and purpose, Articles and Amendments, all to the song of the summer, "Despacito." PrepIT for APUSH and AP GOV Link - http://bit.ly/PrepIT Support MrBettsClass on Patreon - http://bit.ly/PatreonMBC APUSH Shirt - http://bit.ly/MBCAPUSH Historical Parody/Skits every Thursday Follow on Twitter: http://twitter.com/MrBettsClass Instagram: http://instagram.com/MrBettsClass Like on FaceBook: http://facebook.com/MrBettsClass "En la Brisa" Music by Dan-O at http://DanoSongs.com The Articles of Confederation They be giving us, such frustration, yeah Limits feel like strangulation, yeah Oh, we must meet up in Philadelphia Close the windows and lock the doors We the people of the US in order To form a more perfect Union, provide For the defense, see Justice ain’t denied Promote the general welfare of all our lives Oh, yeah, and to insure domestic Tranquility And to secure the Blessings of Liberty To ourselves and our Posterity (ordain this) Constitution Splitting up the government into three branches Executive, Judicial, and the Legislative Separating powers and insuring balance Constitution Building on the concepts of the Magna Carta Locke, Voltaire, and Baron Montesquieu are borrowed Still James Madison is called its father (What does, what does, what does, what does, it say) Article I’s about the Congress House and Senate They regulate and tax, declare war Writing laws with the elastic clause (Necessary and proper, baby) President and Executive fall under Article II III’s about the Judicial Branch Both of these parts are brand new Article IV’s about relation Between the states and nation V covers new amendments And their ratification VI is saying federal law will always be Supreme VII says to make this real nine states will have to agree Checks and balances ensure no branch is growing too strong The Court declares unconstitutional what it thinks is wrong If the law ain’t good, the President can veto Congress can override, impeach his seat too Federalists papers, 85 to make ya Want this Constitution, Publius’s a faker It’s really Hamilton, John Jay, and Madison Still there is one thing I can’t help feel is missing Oh yeah Constitution Will pass if we promise to have a Bill of Rights 10 Amendments, I could talk about them all night Wanna know them, click here, and you will be alright Constitution Delaware’s the first state to ratify New Hampshire is ninth, it’s now bonafide And the new plan takes effect nationwide (Huzzah, huzzah, huzzah, huzzah, huzzah) A living document, it’s meant to adapt to the times 27 Amendments so far One repealed ‘cause it went too far (Prohibition, prohibition, baby) Representative democracy, ensures the people Are the real source of power And this country remains ours Constitution We the people wanted a more perfect Union Founding Fathers came up with this great solution Plan of government that we are still using Constitution
Views: 280100 MrBettsClass
Overview of the Constitution Articles 1-3 (Branches of the Government)
 
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This is a brief overview of the Branches of the Government and Separation of Powers laid out by the Constitution!
Views: 3480 AbbaManChannel
Hon. Michael Lee: Article I Reform and the Global Trade Accountability Act [Restoring Article I]
 
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Under the Constitution, the legislative branch possesses full authority over trade policy. Congress, however, has delegated much of this power to regulate trade to the executive branch, creating a number of serious issues, from trade wars to favoritism to economic depression. What can Congress do to counteract the consequences of their abdication? Mike Lee discusses the history of Congress' trade powers, suggesting a procedural solution to restore the balance of powers intended by the Founders. Featuring: -Michael Lee, Senator, Utah As always, the Federalist Society takes no position on particular legal or public policy issues; all expressions of opinion are those of the speakers.
Views: 17798 The Federalist Society
Article III For Dummies: The Judiciary Explained
 
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The Constitution for Dummies Series returns covering Article 3 of the Constitution, the Judicial Branch. This funky, well organized video lecture will make sure you are shipped out into the world with a clear understanding of the Constitutions language outlining the Judiciary. Subscribe to HipHughes History, it's stupid easy and free https://www.youtube.com/user/hughesdv?sub_confirmation=1&src_vid=hDjLSfWvNlQ&feature=iv&annotation_id=annotation_3651517591
Views: 140447 Hip Hughes
Executive Orders vs. The Law
 
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Here is a thought experiment: What if the segregationist, George Wallace, had won the Presidential Election of 1964 and attempted to use an Executive Order to excuse the south from the provisions of the 13th Amendment? Would this action be any different than drafting an Executive Order which affects the 2nd Amendment (or any Amendment) in an attempt to change the Constitution? Executive Orders are not binding law and do not apply to the American People. This video goes into a bit more detail on how Executive Orders (unmentioned within Article II of the Constitution which defines the powers of the President) are not a legal institution that must be respected by the States or the People. The Constitution provides a means of keeping Presidents from overstepping their boundaries with Congressional & State oversight. What specific means does the Constitution provide to allow for adaptation of existing law and addition of new laws? Sources: (Annotations visible on desktops with Adobe Flash) 1. George Wallace, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Wallace#Democratic_presidential_primaries_of_1964 2. Executive Orders, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Executive_order 3. Emancipation Proclamation, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emancipation_Proclamation 4. US Constitution, http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/charters/constitution_transcript.html 5. 13th Amendment, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thirteenth_Amendment_to_the_United_States_Constitution "Like" this project at: http://www.facebook.com/OurAmericanRepublic
Views: 6216 Mal Partisan
The Constitution for Kids - Article 3
 
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The Supreme Court - Duties and responsibilities of Judges.
Views: 860 Freedom Factor
United States Government CHPT 5-The Executive Branch
 
42:00
Uploaded using authorSTREAM High school US Government on the Executive Branch.
Views: 1596 mindrunfree
United States Constitution - Article III - The Judicial Department (Audio & Text)
 
02:41
Visit https://www.audiolawlibrary.com/ for our complete and growing catalog of free audio recordings of famous, infamous & important documents from United States history. Title: Article III of the United States Constitution - The Judicial Department (Audio & Text) Written in 1787, ratified in 1788, and in operation since 1789, the United States Constitution is the world’s longest surviving written charter of government. Its first three words – “We The People” – affirm that the government of the United States exists to serve its citizens. The supremacy of the people through their elected representatives is recognized in Article I, which creates a Congress consisting of a Senate and a House of Representatives. The positioning of Congress at the beginning of the Constitution affirms its status as the “First Branch” of the federal government. The Constitution assigned to Congress responsibility for organizing the executive and judicial branches, raising revenue, declaring war, and making all laws necessary for executing these powers. The president is permitted to veto specific legislative acts, but Congress has the authority to override presidential vetoes by two-thirds majorities of both houses. The Constitution also provides that the Senate advise and consent on key executive and judicial appointments and on the approval for ratification of treaties. For over two centuries the Constitution has remained in force because its framers successfully separated and balanced governmental powers to safeguard the interests of majority rule and minority rights, of liberty and equality, and of the federal and state governments. More a concise statement of national principles than a detailed plan of governmental operation, the Constitution has evolved to meet the changing needs of a modern society profoundly different from the eighteenth-century world in which its creators lived. To date, the Constitution has been amended 27 times, most recently in 1992. The first ten amendments constitute the Bill of Rights. This LibriVox recording is in the public domain. Read by Michael Scherer
Views: 82 Audio Law Library
American History - Part 018 - Birth of the Constitution - Part 4 - Executive Branch
 
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01/03/2013 From VOA Learning English, welcome to THE MAKING OF A NATION -- American history in Special English. I'm Steve Ember. This week in our series, we continue the story of the United States Constitution. In May of 1787, a group of America's early leaders met in the city of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. They planned to amend the Articles of Confederation. That document established a loose union of the 13 states. Instead, they wrote a completely new constitution. It created America's system of government and recognized the rights of its citizens. Last week, we talked about the debate at the convention over the Virginia Plan. The plan was prepared by James Madison and other delegates from the state of Virginia. It described a national government with a supreme legislature, executive and judiciary. Some delegates feared that such a central government would take away power from the states. But in the end, they approved the proposal. On June 1, they began debate on the issue of a national executive. It seemed every delegate at the Philadelphia convention had something to say about the issue. They had been thinking about it for some time. Almost every delegate was afraid to give the position extended powers. Almost no one wanted America's chief executive to become as powerful as a king. Still, many of the delegates had faith in the idea of a one-person executive. Others demanded an executive of three people. James Wilson of Pennsylvania argued for a single executive. He said the position required energy and the ability to make decisions quickly. He said these would best be found in one person. Edmund Randolph of Virginia disagreed strongly. He said he considered a one-person executive as "the fetus of monarchy." John Dickinson of Delaware said he did not denounce the idea of having a government headed by a king. He said a monarchy was one of the best forms of government in the world. However, in America, he said, a king was "out of the question." The debate over the size of the executive leadership lasted a long time. Finally, the delegates voted for a one-person executive.
Views: 14132 ListenAndReadAlong
The Constitutional War Powers of the Executive and Legislative Branches
 
01:22:12
What kind of war power does the Constitution grant the President and Congress? What limitations apply to each branch concerning the power to declare war and the use of military force? Over time, how has the Framers’ understanding been followed and in what ways has it been ignored? Do the founding principles regarding these topics still have application to our modern era? Join us for an insightful discussion with Former Congressman Mickey Edwards, Hofstra Constitutional Law Professor Julian Ku, and National Review Institute Senior Fellow Andrew C. McCarthy. As always, the Federalist Society takes no position on particular legal or public policy issues; all expressions of opinion are those of the speaker. Featuring: Honorable Mickey Edwards, Former Congressman, Vice President and Program Director, Rodel Fellowships In Public Leadership, Aspen Institute Hofstra Research Fellow Andrew C. McCarthy, Senior Fellow, National Review Institute Moderator: Nate Kaczmarek, Deputy Director, Article I Initiative at The Federalist Society Link to the event page: http://www.fed-soc.org/events/detail/the-constitutional-war-powers-of-the-executive-and-legislative-branches
Lecture Notes: Articles of the Confederation to the Constitution
 
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analyze the development of American Constitutional government, explaining its relationship to the Enlightenment, and describe how the early national leaders implemented the new government (GPS) (SSUH_D2007-34) 34a - explain how weaknesses in the Articles of Confederation (no Executive branch, no taxation, no national currency, and no regulation of interstate commerce) and Daniel Shays' Rebellion led to a call for a stronger central government, 34b - explain the key features of the Constitution, specifically, the Great Compromise, separation of powers, limited government, and the issue of slavery (3/5 Compromise) and connect them to the ideas of the Enlightenment, 34c - evaluate the major arguments of the anti-Federalists and Federalists during the debate on ratification of the Constitution put forth in the Federalists Papers concerning form of government, factions, checks and balances, and the power of the executive, including the roles of Alexander Hamilton and James Madison, 34d - analyze how the Bill of Rights serves as a protector of individual and states rights,
Views: 2794 CoachBakerOnline
Constitutional Compromises: Crash Course Government and Politics #5
 
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In which Craig Benzine teaches you about the compromises met in ratifying the U.S. Constitution. The United State’s didn’t always have its current system of government. Actually, this is it’s second attempt. Craig will delve into the failures (and few successes) of the Articles of Confederation, tell you how delegates settled on a two-house system of representation, discuss the issues of slavery and population that have been imbedded into our constitution, and fire up the clone machine to discuss how federalists and anti-federalist opposition provided the U.S. a Bill of Rights. And who knows, maybe all this talk of compromise will even inspire Craig and eagle to find some middle ground. Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Support is provided by Voqal: http://www.voqal.org Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Instagram - http://instagram.com/thecrashcourse
Views: 1052649 CrashCourse
COUNTERMAND AMENDMENT the Missing Piece in the Article V Puzzle
 
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COUNTERMAND AMENDMENT the Missing Piece in the Article V Puzzle video. We can restore our Constitutional Republic and States Rights under Article V, through State Legislatures and without the consent of Congress, the Courts or the Executive Branch.
Views: 814 Charles Kacprowicz
Constitution Hall Pass:The Presidency
 
22:10
Just in time for the 2012 election, this engaging, interactive lesson traces the history of the American presidency and features a special introduction by ABC News anchor George Stephanopoulos—former adviser and communications director for President Bill Clinton. Join constitutional experts and the Center's education staff to explore why it was important for our young nation to have an executive branch, and why nevertheless some people were worried about giving it too much power. We'll also take a trip to a very special location in America's presidential history. We'll be hailing to the chief as we ring in the Constitution's 225th anniversary!
PGC OBE Interview related to Article VII: Executive Department
 
09:50
A.Y. 2016-2017, 2-21 Mr. Jaztin Jairum Manalo
Views: 31 Mariel Alejandro
United States Constitution - Article I - The Legislative Department (Audio & Text)
 
14:19
Visit https://www.audiolawlibrary.com/ for our complete and growing catalog of free audio recordings of famous, infamous & important documents from United States history. Title: Article I of the United States Constitution - The Legislative Department (Audio & Text) Written in 1787, ratified in 1788, and in operation since 1789, the United States Constitution is the world’s longest surviving written charter of government. Its first three words – “We The People” – affirm that the government of the United States exists to serve its citizens. The supremacy of the people through their elected representatives is recognized in Article I, which creates a Congress consisting of a Senate and a House of Representatives. The positioning of Congress at the beginning of the Constitution affirms its status as the “First Branch” of the federal government. The Constitution assigned to Congress responsibility for organizing the executive and judicial branches, raising revenue, declaring war, and making all laws necessary for executing these powers. The president is permitted to veto specific legislative acts, but Congress has the authority to override presidential vetoes by two-thirds majorities of both houses. The Constitution also provides that the Senate advise and consent on key executive and judicial appointments and on the approval for ratification of treaties. For over two centuries the Constitution has remained in force because its framers successfully separated and balanced governmental powers to safeguard the interests of majority rule and minority rights, of liberty and equality, and of the federal and state governments. More a concise statement of national principles than a detailed plan of governmental operation, the Constitution has evolved to meet the changing needs of a modern society profoundly different from the eighteenth-century world in which its creators lived. To date, the Constitution has been amended 27 times, most recently in 1992. The first ten amendments constitute the Bill of Rights. This LibriVox recording is in the public domain. Read by Michael Scherer
Views: 191 Audio Law Library
The Duties of the Three Branches of Government
 
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In this screencast, explore the legislative, executive, and judiciary branches of the U.S. government. External resource: www.usconstitution.com
Views: 124 Wisc-Online