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Data Analysis in SPSS Made Easy
 
14:06
Use simple data analysis techniques in SPSS to analyze survey questions.
Views: 834438 Claus Ebster
SPSS for questionnaire analysis:  Correlation analysis
 
20:01
Basic introduction to correlation - how to interpret correlation coefficient, and how to chose the right type of correlation measure for your situation. 0:00 Introduction to bivariate correlation 2:20 Why does SPSS provide more than one measure for correlation? 3:26 Example 1: Pearson correlation 7:54 Example 2: Spearman (rhp), Kendall's tau-b 15:26 Example 3: correlation matrix I could make this video real quick and just show you Pearson's correlation coefficient, which is commonly taught in a introductory stats course. However, the Pearson's correlation IS NOT always applicable as it depends on whether your data satisfies certain conditions. So to do correlation analysis, it's better I bring together all the types of measures of correlation given in SPSS in one presentation. Watch correlation and regression: https://youtu.be/tDxeR6JT6nM ------------------------- Correlation of 2 rodinal variables, non monotonic This question has been asked a few times, so I will make a video on it. But to answer your question, monotonic means in one direction. I suggest you plot the 2 variables and you'll see whether or not there is a monotonic relationship there. If there is a little non-monotonic relationship then Spearman is still fine. Remember we are measuring the TENDENCY for the 2 variables to move up-up/down-down/up-down together. If you have strong non-monotonic shape in the plot ie. a curve then you could abandon correlation and do a chi-square test of association - this is the "correlation" for qualitative variables. And since your 2 variables are ordinal, they are qualitative. Good luck
Views: 512651 Phil Chan
SPSS for Beginners 1: Introduction
 
07:19
Updated video 2018: SPSS for Beginners - Introduction https://youtu.be/_zFBUfZEBWQ This video provides an introduction to SPSS/PASW. It shows how to navigate between Data View and Variable View, and shows how to modify properties of variables.
Views: 1499511 Research By Design
IBM SPSS Statistics Part 1: Descriptive Statistics
 
01:01:33
Skip to the start of instruction @ 18:15. This workshop covers the basics of SPSS - data entry, reporting and editing. Learn how to define variables and utilize basic functions and techniques in order to generate descriptive statistics from data entered into SPSS. Handout: http://www.calstatela.edu/sites/default/files/groups/Information%20Technology%20Services/training/pdf/spss23p1.pdf Data Files: http://www.calstatela.edu/its/training/datafiles/spss23p1.zip #MyCalStateLA #ITS #SPSS
Views: MyCalStateLA
Save SPSS Output as a PDF File (for Printing)
 
02:08
This video shows how to save an SPSS output file as a PDF file, which can make it much easier for double-sided duplex printing. Want more statistics and SPSS? Sample our courses here: https://www.udemy.com/inferential-statistics-spss/?couponCode=only19YT https://www.udemy.com/descriptive-statistics-spss/?couponCode=only15YT Save SPSS File SPSS Output File Save Output as PDF Video Transcript: In this video I'd like to take a look at how to save your output as a PDF file in SPSS. And the reason why I do this most often is I don't know about you on your printer if you've noticed this but when I print SPSS files, I often like to print duplex or two sided, double-sided output because SPSS, particularly when I'm generating a lot of analyses, it can create reams and reams of paper and I don't want to waste that paper, so I'd like to print two-sided. But when I try and print in SPSS the print dialog box it really doesn't give me a lot of options and it prints one-sided. So the way I get around that is if I go to File and then select Export, and then let's go ahead and I'll just save it to IBM and SPSS and then I'll save it to statistics. I'll go ahead and type in test file. OK and then I'm going to save that. And then what I want to do is select, All visible. This way I don't have anything that's hidden such as notes displayed. I don't want that. And then by default it shows to open the containing folder which can be helpful as its location opens up automatically, so I have to go find it if I've forgotten where I saved it. And then also notice that type we have PDF here portable document format is selected and there are other options as well. OK so then click OK. And then here this takes a minute for SPSS to generate the PDF and then I have my file here so I'll go ahead and open that up and then here we go now I have the output in a PDF file and if I print this now I can get a two-sided option. Notice the changes on my printer I get my two-sided option, I'm ready to go. OK that's it for saving an SPSS output file in PDF format. Thanks for watching. YouTube Channel: Quantitative Specialists https://www.youtube.com/user/statisticsinstructor Channel Description: For step by step help with statistics, with a focus on SPSS. Both descriptive and inferential statistics covered. For descriptive statistics, topics covered include: mean, median, and mode in spss, standard deviation and variance in spss, bar charts in spss, histograms in spss, bivariate scatterplots in spss, stem and leaf plots in spss, frequency distribution tables in spss, creating labels in spss, sorting variables in spss, inserting variables in spss, inserting rows in spss, and modifying default options in spss. For inferential statistics, topics covered include: t tests in spss, anova in spss, correlation in spss, regression in spss, chi square in spss, and MANOVA in spss. New videos regularly posted. Videos series coming soon include: multiple regression in spss, factor analysis in spss, nonparametric tests in spss, multiple comparisons in spss, linear contrasts in spss, and many more. Subscribe today! YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/statisticsinstructor
Tutorial: Introduction to SPSS
 
36:00
VIDEO SECTIONS: 0:30 – Preparing a Data Set 10:51 – Transforming Data 17:49 – Descriptive Statistics 29:25 – SPSS Syntax Editor
Views: 476054 Meredith Rocchi
SPSS Questionnaire/Survey Data Entry - Part 1
 
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How to enter and analyze questionnaire (survey) data in SPSS is illustrated in this video. Lots more Questionnaire/Survey & SPSS Videos here: https://www.udemy.com/survey-data/?couponCode=SurveyLikertVideosYT Check out our next text, 'SPSS Cheat Sheet,' here: http://goo.gl/b8sRHa. Prime and ‘Unlimited’ members, get our text for free. (Only 4.99 otherwise, but likely to increase soon.) Survey data Survey data entry Questionnaire data entry Channel Description: https://www.youtube.com/user/statisticsinstructor For step by step help with statistics, with a focus on SPSS. Both descriptive and inferential statistics covered. For descriptive statistics, topics covered include: mean, median, and mode in spss, standard deviation and variance in spss, bar charts in spss, histograms in spss, bivariate scatterplots in spss, stem and leaf plots in spss, frequency distribution tables in spss, creating labels in spss, sorting variables in spss, inserting variables in spss, inserting rows in spss, and modifying default options in spss. For inferential statistics, topics covered include: t tests in spss, anova in spss, correlation in spss, regression in spss, chi square in spss, and MANOVA in spss. New videos regularly posted. Subscribe today! YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/statisticsinstructor Video Transcript: In this video we'll take a look at how to enter questionnaire or survey data into SPSS and this is something that a lot of people have questions with so it's important to make sure when you're working with SPSS in particular when you're entering data from a survey that you know how to do. Let's go ahead and take a few moments to look at that. And here you see on the right-hand side of your screen I have a questionnaire, a very short sample questionnaire that I want to enter into SPSS so we're going to create a data file and in this questionnaire here I've made a few modifications. I've underlined some variable names here and I'll talk about that more in a minute and I also put numbers in parentheses to the right of these different names and I'll also explain that as well. Now normally when someone sees this survey we wouldn't have gender underlined for example nor would we have these numbers to the right of male and female. So that's just for us, to help better understand how to enter these data. So let's go ahead and get started here. In SPSS the first thing we need to do is every time we have a possible answer such as male or female we need to create a variable in SPSS that will hold those different answers. So our first variable needs to be gender and that's why that's underlined there just to assist us as we're doing this. So we want to make sure we're in the Variable View tab and then in the first row here under Name we want to type gender and then press ENTER and that creates the variable gender. Now notice here I have two options: male and female. So when people respond or circle or check here that they're male, I need to enter into SPSS some number to indicate that. So we always want to enter numbers whenever possible into SPSS because SPSS for the vast majority of analyses performs statistical analyses on numbers not on words. So I wouldn't want and enter male, female, and so forth. I want to enter one's, two's and so on. So notice here I just arbitrarily decided males get a 1 and females get a 2. It could have been the other way around but since male was the first name listed I went and gave that 1 and then for females I gave a 2. So what we want to do in our data file here is go head and go to Values, this column, click on the None cell, notice these three dots appear they're called an ellipsis, click on that and then our first value notice here 1 is male so Value of 1 and then type Label Male and then click Add. And then our second value of 2 is for females so go ahead and enter 2 for Value and then Female, click Add and then we're done with that you want to see both of them down here and that looks good so click OK. Now those labels are in here and I'll show you how that works when we enter some numbers in a minute. OK next we have ethnicity so I'm going to call this variable ethnicity. So go ahead and type that in press ENTER and then we're going to the same thing we're going to create value labels here so 1 is African-American, 2 is Asian-American, and so on. And I'll just do that very quickly so going to Values column, click on the ellipsis. For 1 we have African American, for 2 Asian American, 3 is Caucasian, and just so you can see that here 3 is Caucasian, 4 is Hispanic, and other is 5, so let's go ahead and finish that. Four is Hispanic, 5 is other, so let's go to do that 5 is other. OK and that's it for that variable. Now we do have it says please state I'll talk about that next that's important when they can enter text we have to handle that differently.
Views: 560090 Quantitative Specialists
SPSS Tutorial: One Way ANOVA
 
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http://thedoctoraljourney.com/ This tutorial demonstrates how to conduct a One Way ANOVA in SPSS. For more statistics, research and SPSS tools, visit http://thedoctoraljourney.com/.
Views: 447792 The Doctoral Journey
Pearson Correlation - SPSS
 
05:01
I demonstrate how to perform and interpret a Pearson correlation in SPSS.
Views: 684159 how2stats
Independent t-test - SPSS (Example 1)
 
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I perform an independent samples t-test on data that have been simulated to correspond to an actual study done by Brody et al. (2004), which tested the hypothesis that individuals who do not smoke would have relatively larger frontal lobes than individuals who do smoke. Something I didn't mention in the video is relevant to causality. Despite the fact that the Brody et al. (2004) investigation found that smokers have relatively smaller frontal lobes than non-smokers, one does not have a basis to infer causality in this case. Get the data here: http://how2stats.blogspot.com.au/2014/03/independent-samples-t-test-data1.html
Views: 622345 how2stats
SPSS Tutorials: Binary Logistic Regression
 
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SPSS Tutorials: Binary Logistic Regression is part of the Departmental of Methodology Software tutorials sponsored by a grant from the LSE Annual Fund. For more information on the Departmental of Methodology visit www.lse.ac.uk/methodologyInstitute or follow us on twitter.com/MethodologyLSE LSE Annual Fund webpage http://www.alumni.lse.ac.uk/olc/pub/LHE/filemanager/annualfund/default.htm
Views: 225367 Methodology LSE
Factor Analysis Using SPSS
 
15:03
This video describes how to perform a factor analysis using SPSS and interpret the results.
Views: 245938 Dr. Todd Grande
Statistics: Correlation and Regression Analysis in SPSS
 
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This video shows how to use SPSS to conduct a Correlation and Regression Analysis. A simple null hypothesis is tested as well. The regression equation is explained despite the result of the hypothesis conclusion. ====================================================== Ways to support my channel: 1. Like, Share and Subscribe. 2. Buy Andy Field's textbook here: http://amzn.to/2yxomuQ 3. Buy SPSS (Student's version) here: http://amzn.to/2g19Ofc 4. Buy this book written by Dr. Everett Piper, President of Oklahoma Wesleyan University. Analyzes the current higher education system: http://amzn.to/2y6tpRk 5. Donate at PayPal.Me/AGRONKACI ============================ MORE VIDEOS: Watch Using Excel to find the Correlation Coefficient r here: https://youtu.be/y3bgaLwdm50 Watch ANOVA in SPSS here: https://youtu.be/Bx9ry1vBbTM Watch Sampling Distribution of Sample Means here: https://youtu.be/anGsd2l5YpM Watch Using Excel Charts to calculate Regression Equation here: https://youtu.be/qZjTtnyaV70 Watch Using Excel to calculate Regression Equation here: https://youtu.be/LDC0p9iZY8g Watch ANOVA in Microsoft Excel (One-Way) here: https://youtu.be/WhBkgWL3_3k Useful stuff: 6. Robot Vacuum Cleaner: http://amzn.to/2xpNGCH 7. Roku Express: http://amzn.to/2yvvAPQ 8. Mini Coffee Maker: http://amzn.to/2y7S1tq 9. Xbox One S 1TB Console - Forza Horizon 3 Bundle: http://amzn.to/2xoycPA 10. Xbox One 1TB Console - Tom Clancy's The Division Bundle: http://amzn.to/2yxYi2J ============================
Views: 236297 Agron Kaci
SPSS: Survey Analysis
 
24:25
Views: 20520 Ross Avilla
Linear Regression in SPSS
 
27:57
This video explains how to perform a Linear Regression in SPSS, including how to determine if the assumptions for the regression are met.
Views: 42639 Dr. Todd Grande
Interpreting Output for Multiple Regression in SPSS
 
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This video demonstrates how to interpret multiple regression output in SPSS. This example includes two predictor variables and one outcome variable. Unstandardized and standardized coefficients are reviewed.
Views: 142113 Dr. Todd Grande
Qualitative data analysis
 
22:49
Views: 45143 Jeongeun Kim
Oneway ANOVA - SPSS (part 1)
 
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In this video, I demonstrate how to perform and interpret a oneway analysis of variance (ANOVA) in SPSS. I do so using two different procedures and describe the benefits of each. one way anova
Views: 657032 how2stats
SPSS Example   Saving files
 
09:55
Tutorial going over how to save your SPSS data (.sav), syntax (.sps), and output (.spv) files.
Views: 6483 Daniel Potter
Linear Regression - SPSS (part 1)
 
05:07
I demonstrate how to perform a linear regression analysis in SPSS. The data consist of two variables: (1) independent variable (years of education), and (2) dependent variable (weekly earnings). It was hypothesized that years of education would be positively associated with weekly earnings. Additionally, the slope (unstandardized beta weight) and intercept (value of Y when X is 0) were identified and interpreted.
Views: 509363 how2stats
Time Series Analysis in SPSS
 
44:59
SPSS training on Conjoint Analysis by Vamsidhar Ambatipudi
Views: 34491 Vamsidhar Ambatipudi
exploratory factor analysis in SPSS example 01
 
15:15
exploratory factor analysis in SPSS example 01
Views: 62233 Math Guy Zero
Logistic Regression - SPSS (part 1)
 
05:04
I demonstrate how to perform a binary (a.k.a., binomial) logistic regression. The data were simulated to correspond to a "real-life" case where an attempt is made to build a model to predict the probability that a person would default on a loan, using annual salary and gender as predictors.
Views: 380002 how2stats
Factor Analysis in SPSS (Principal Components Analysis) - Part 1
 
06:04
In this video, we look at how to run an exploratory factor analysis (principal components analysis) in SPSS (Part 1 of 6). Youtube SPSS factor analysis Principal Component Analysis YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/statisticsinstructor Subscribe today! Lifetime access to SPSS videos: http://tinyurl.com/m2532td Video Transcript: In this video we'll take a look at how to run a factor analysis or more specifically we'll be running a principal components analysis in SPSS. And as we begin here it's important to note, because it can get confusing in the field, that factor analysis is an umbrella term where the whole subject area is known as factor analysis but within that subject there's two types of main analyses that are run. The first type is called principal components analysis and that's what we'll be running in SPSS today. And the other type is known as common factor analysis and you'll see that come up sometimes. But in my experience principal components analysis is the most commonly used procedure and it's also the default procedure in SPSS. And if you look on the screen here you can see there's five variables: SWLS 1, 2 3, 4 and 5. And what these variables are they come from the items of the Satisfaction with Life Scale published by Diener et al. And what people do is they take these five items they respond to the five items where SLWS1 is "In most ways my life is close to my ideal;" and then we have "The conditions of my life are excellent;" "I am satisfied with my life;" "So far I've gotten the important things I want in life;" and then SWLS5 is "If I could live my life over I would change almost nothing." So what happens is the people respond to these five questions or items and for each question they have the following responses, which I've already input here into SPSS value labels: strongly disagree all the way through strongly agree, which gives us a 1 through 7 point scale for each question. So what we want to do here in our principal components analysis is we want to go ahead and analyze these five variables or items and see if we can reduce these five variables or items into one or a few components or factors which explain the relationship among the variables. So let's go ahead and start by running a correlation matrix and what we'll do is we're going to Analyze, Correlate, Bivariate, and then we'll move these five variables over. Go ahead and click OK and then here notice we get the correlation matrix of SWLS1 through SWLS5. So these are all the intercorrelations that we have here. And if we look at this off-diagonal where these ones here are the diagonal. And they're just a one because of variable is correlated with itself so that's always 1.0. And then the off-diagonal here represents the correlations of the items with one another. So for example this .531 here; notice it says in SPSS that the correlation is significant at the .01 level, two tailed. So this here is the correlation between SWLS2 and SLWS1. So all of these in this triangle here indicate the correlation between the different variables or items on the Satisfaction with Life Scale. And what we want to see here in factor analysis which we're about to run is that these variables are correlated with one another and at a minimum significantly so. Because what factor analysis or principal components analysis does is that it analyzes the correlations or relationships between our variables and basically we try to determine a smaller number of variables that can explain these correlations. So notice here we're starting with five variables, SWLS1 through five. Well hopefully in this analysis when we run our factor analysis we'll come out with one component that does a good job of explaining all these correlations here. And one of the key points of factor analysis is it's a data reduction technique. What that means is we enter a certain number of variables, like five in this example, or even 20 or 50 or what have you, and we hope to reduce those variables down to just a few; between one and let's say 5 or 6 is most of the solutions that I see. Now in this case since we have five variables we really want to reduce this down to 1 or 2 at most but 1 would be good in this case. So that's really a key point of factor analysis: we take a number of variables and we try to explain the correlations between those variables through a smaller number of factors or components and by doing that what we do is we get more parsimonious solution, a more succinct solution that explains these variables or relationships. And there's a lot of applications of factor analysis but one of the primary ones is when you're analyzing scales or items on a scale and you want to see how that scale turns out, so how many dimensions or factors doesn't it have to it.
Chi-square test in SPSS + interpretation
 
05:03
How to run a chi-square test and interpret the output in SPSS (v20). ASK SPSS Tutorial Series
Views: 898191 BrunelASK
Principal Components Analysis - SPSS (part 1)
 
05:06
I demonstrate how to perform a principal components analysis based on some real data that correspond to the percentage discount/premium associated with nine listed investment companies. Based on the results of the PCA, the listed investment companies could be segmented into two largely orthogonal components.
Views: 197882 how2stats
24. How to do trend analysis in SPSS?
 
06:32
Md Aktaruzzaman Assistant Professor, IUT, Gazipur, Bangladesh PhD Student, Monash Uni, Melbourne, Australia
Views: 41355 akhtariut
How to Use SPSS For Data Analysis (Part 1) | Interface and Questionnaire/Survey Data Entry | Bangla.
 
10:38
Hello friends, This video show you How to Use SPSS Software For Data Analysis (Part 1) | Interface and Questionnaire/Survey Data Entry | Bangla Tutorial by Walid Tech BD. you can learn SPSS part by part from beginning to ending for data analysis purpose. For step by step help with statistics, with a focus on SPSS. Both descriptive and inferential statistics covered. For descriptive statistics, topics covered include: mean, median, and mode in spss, standard deviation and variance in spss, bar charts in spss, histograms in spss, bivariate scatterplots in spss, stem and leaf plots in spss, frequency distribution tables in spss, creating labels in spss, sorting variables in spss, inserting variables in spss, inserting rows in spss, and modifying default options in spss. For inferential statistics, topics covered include: t tests in spss, anova in spss, correlation in spss, regression in spss, chi square in spss, and MANOVA in spss. New videos regularly posted. Subscribe today! In this video we'll take a look at how to enter questionnaire or survey data into SPSS and this is something that a lot of people have questions with so it's important to make sure when you're working with SPSS in particular when you're entering data from a survey that you know how to do. Let's go ahead and take a few moments to look at that. And here you see on the right-hand side of your screen I have a questionnaire, a very short sample questionnaire that I want to enter into SPSS so we're going to create a data file and in this questionnaire here I've made a few modifications. I've underlined some variable names here and I'll talk about that more in a minute and I also put numbers in parentheses to the right of these different names and I'll also explain that as well. Now normally when someone sees this survey we wouldn't have gender underlined for example nor would we have these numbers to the right of male and female. So that's just for us, to help better understand how to enter these data. So let's go ahead and get started here. In SPSS the first thing we need to do is every time we have a possible answer such as male or female we need to create a variable in SPSS that will hold those different answers. So our first variable needs to be gender and that's why that's underlined there just to assist us as we're doing this. So we want to make sure we're in the Variable View tab and then in the first row here under Name we want to type gender and then press ENTER and that creates the variable gender. Now notice here I have two options: male and female. So when people respond or circle or check here that they're male, I need to enter into SPSS some number to indicate that. So we always want to enter numbers whenever possible into SPSS because SPSS for the vast majority of analyses performs statistical analyses on numbers not on words. So I wouldn't want and enter male, female, and so forth. I want to enter one's, two's and so on. So notice here I just arbitrarily decided males get a 1 and females get a 2. It could have been the other way around but since male was the first name listed I went and gave that 1 and then for females I gave a 2. So what we want to do in our data file here is go head and go to Values, this column, click on the None cell, notice these three dots appear they're called an ellipsis, click on that and then our first value notice here 1 is male so Value of 1 and then type Label Male and then click Add. And then our second value of 2 is for females so go ahead and enter 2 for Value and then Female, click Add and then we're done with that you want to see both of them down here and that looks good so click OK. Now those labels are in here and I'll show you how that works when we enter some numbers in a minute. for Any Help Please Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/walidtechbd Please like and comment if you enjoyed this video. Share it with your friends. Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/Walid-Tech-B... twiterr : https://twitter.com/walid_hosain previous video link..: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t0DrC... video editing : https://youtu.be/rH6c9cQClxg youtube channel monitaizaton: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dWKMh... create gmail account:: https://youtu.be/cQXIJ3DIYa4 you tube seo tips and trics : https://youtu.be/SwwlS2ZWOkY subscriber butto create . https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7_iPY... previous video :https://youtu.be/hlReTZ5NXMU previous video : https://youtu.be/-edP7z_ktkg How to increase subscriber: https://youtu.be/EI-0VYPOpJI Share This video : https://youtu.be/OPKa1-r_7zI thanks for watching. by Walid Tech BD https://youtu.be/UI0en1FSJIY Trimmer Unboxing : https://youtu.be/_aE1ANbxqGE : https://youtu.be/urLhChmuYDI video: https://youtu.be/nf1B5lYzcVY Share this video : https://youtu.be/eWErTbQID3Y Don't forget to subscribe to my channel :) Thanks for Watching
Views: 15621 Walid Tech BD
Hierarchical Cluster Analysis SPSS
 
09:50
In this video I walk you through how to run and interpret a hierarchical cluster analysis in SPSS and how to infer relationships depicted in a dendrogram. Here is a link to the data: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B3T1TGdHG9aEbXBEMnZxQU43Qjg/view?usp=sharing
Views: 111857 James Gaskin
Interpret SPSS output for correlations: Pearson's r
 
03:17
How to interpret the SPSS output for Pearson's r correlation coefficient. ASK SPSS Tutorial Series
Views: 207011 BrunelASK
Basic Analysis in AMOS and SPSS
 
05:31
This is just a demonstration for how to go through the most basic uses of AMOS and SPSS. I use a simple linear regression for the example.
Views: 269540 James Gaskin
MANOVA - SPSS (part 1)
 
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I perform and interpret a MANOVA in SPSS in two ways. First, the more common method using the GUI. Then, the more sophisticated and insightful way through syntax which allows for an understanding of the discriminant function that is created by the MANOVA procedure. Anyone who makes it to the end of this video series is a champion. Learn how to report MANOVA results: http://how2stats.blogspot.com/2011/10/manova-reporting-type-1.html http://how2stats.blogspot.com/2011/10/manova-reporting-type-2.html SPSS Multivariate Analysis of Variance syntax: MANOVA dependent1 dependent 2 dependent3 by independent (1, 3) /DISCRIM=STAN RAW CORR /PRINT=SIGNIF(MULTIV, UNIV, EIGEN, DIMENR) /DESIGN.
Views: 277427 how2stats
Qualitative analysis of interview data: A step-by-step guide
 
06:51
The content applies to qualitative data analysis in general. Do not forget to share this Youtube link with your friends. The steps are also described in writing below (Click Show more): STEP 1, reading the transcripts 1.1. Browse through all transcripts, as a whole. 1.2. Make notes about your impressions. 1.3. Read the transcripts again, one by one. 1.4. Read very carefully, line by line. STEP 2, labeling relevant pieces 2.1. Label relevant words, phrases, sentences, or sections. 2.2. Labels can be about actions, activities, concepts, differences, opinions, processes, or whatever you think is relevant. 2.3. You might decide that something is relevant to code because: *it is repeated in several places; *the interviewee explicitly states that it is important; *you have read about something similar in reports, e.g. scientific articles; *it reminds you of a theory or a concept; *or for some other reason that you think is relevant. You can use preconceived theories and concepts, be open-minded, aim for a description of things that are superficial, or aim for a conceptualization of underlying patterns. It is all up to you. It is your study and your choice of methodology. You are the interpreter and these phenomena are highlighted because you consider them important. Just make sure that you tell your reader about your methodology, under the heading Method. Be unbiased, stay close to the data, i.e. the transcripts, and do not hesitate to code plenty of phenomena. You can have lots of codes, even hundreds. STEP 3, decide which codes are the most important, and create categories by bringing several codes together 3.1. Go through all the codes created in the previous step. Read them, with a pen in your hand. 3.2. You can create new codes by combining two or more codes. 3.3. You do not have to use all the codes that you created in the previous step. 3.4. In fact, many of these initial codes can now be dropped. 3.5. Keep the codes that you think are important and group them together in the way you want. 3.6. Create categories. (You can call them themes if you want.) 3.7. The categories do not have to be of the same type. They can be about objects, processes, differences, or whatever. 3.8. Be unbiased, creative and open-minded. 3.9. Your work now, compared to the previous steps, is on a more general, abstract level. You are conceptualizing your data. STEP 4, label categories and decide which are the most relevant and how they are connected to each other 4.1. Label the categories. Here are some examples: Adaptation (Category) Updating rulebook (sub-category) Changing schedule (sub-category) New routines (sub-category) Seeking information (Category) Talking to colleagues (sub-category) Reading journals (sub-category) Attending meetings (sub-category) Problem solving (Category) Locate and fix problems fast (sub-category) Quick alarm systems (sub-category) 4.2. Describe the connections between them. 4.3. The categories and the connections are the main result of your study. It is new knowledge about the world, from the perspective of the participants in your study. STEP 5, some options 5.1. Decide if there is a hierarchy among the categories. 5.2. Decide if one category is more important than the other. 5.3. Draw a figure to summarize your results. STEP 6, write up your results 6.1. Under the heading Results, describe the categories and how they are connected. Use a neutral voice, and do not interpret your results. 6.2. Under the heading Discussion, write out your interpretations and discuss your results. Interpret the results in light of, for example: *results from similar, previous studies published in relevant scientific journals; *theories or concepts from your field; *other relevant aspects. STEP 7 Ending remark Nb: it is also OK not to divide the data into segments. Narrative analysis of interview transcripts, for example, does not rely on the fragmentation of the interview data. (Narrative analysis is not discussed in this tutorial.) Further, I have assumed that your task is to make sense of a lot of unstructured data, i.e. that you have qualitative data in the form of interview transcripts. However, remember that most of the things I have said in this tutorial are basic, and also apply to qualitative analysis in general. You can use the steps described in this tutorial to analyze: *notes from participatory observations; *documents; *web pages; *or other types of qualitative data. STEP 8 Suggested reading Alan Bryman's book: 'Social Research Methods' published by Oxford University Press. Steinar Kvale's and Svend Brinkmann's book 'InterViews: Learning the Craft of Qualitative Research Interviewing' published by SAGE. Text and video (including audio) © Kent Löfgren, Sweden
Views: 725965 Kent Löfgren
Interpreting SPSS Output for Factor Analysis
 
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This video demonstrates how interpret the SPSS output for a factor analysis. Results including communalities, KMO and Bartlett’s Test, total variance explained, and the rotated component matrix are interpreted.
Views: 128174 Dr. Todd Grande
Likert Scales and Data Analysis
 
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Advice on gathering and analyzing data in organizations, tips on using Likert scales, and a case study on leveraging data to help the bottom line. McMillan Interview http://videos.asq.org/influencing-public-policy-with-data-analysis Full Case Study by S. Pandravada and T. Gurun https://secure.asq.org/perl/msg.pl?prvurl=http://asq.org/2017/02/statistical-process-control/fresh-foods-ordering-process.pdf
Views: 14966 ASQ
Pearson r Correlation in SPSS - How to Calculate and Interpret (Part 1)
 
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Pearson r Correlation in SPSS - How to Calculate and Interpret Correlation (Part 1). Check out our next text, 'SPSS Cheat Sheet,' here: http://goo.gl/b8sRHa. Prime and 'Unlimited' members, get our text for free! (Only $4.99 otherwise, but will likely increase soon.) For additional SPSS/Statistics videos: SPSS Descriptive Statistics Videos: http://tinyurl.com/lyxnk72 SPSS Inferential Statistics Videos: http://tinyurl.com/lm9hpwc Our four-part YouTube video series on regression: http://youtu.be/ubZT2Fl2UkQ How to calculate the correlation coefficient in SPSS is covered in this video. The correlation is also tested for significance and a scatterplot is constructed. YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/statisticsinstructor Video Transcript: In this video we'll take a look at how to calculate the correlation coefficient in SPSS. Now when we talk about calculating correlation what we mean here is Pearson correlation. The Pearson correlation measures the degree of the linear relationship between two variables. When we say linear what we mean is that the relationship can be well characterized by a straight line. So a straight line does a good job of representing the relationship. Correlation ranges from negative 1.0 to positive 1.0. There are 3 types of relationships I'd like to talk about with Pearson correlation. And in this description we have two variables the first variable is X and the second variable is Y. So our first type of relationship is a positive relationship and for a positive relationship or a positive correlation that's saying the same thing higher scores on X are associated with higher scores on Y. And what this means is there's a tendency for if an individual has a high score on X they're also going to tend to have a high score on Y. It's not necessarily perfect in most cases it won't be but if you know someone's score on X it gives you a good idea of where they are on Y. High on X high on Y. For positive it's also true that if you have a lower score on X you would tend to have a lower score on Y. The second type of relationship is a negative relationship or negative correlation. Now here we see the opposite pattern. So here higher scores on X are associated with lower scores on Y and vice versa. Lower scores on X are associated with higher scores on Y. Finally our last type of relationship is no relationship and that means there's no predictable relationship between X and Y. And another way to think about it is where here we had higher on X we had higher on Y for positive and for negative we had higher on X with lower on Y, well for no relationship we have if you have a low X you're going to have some low Ys, some medium Ys, and some high Ys. If you have a high X you're going to once again have some low Ys, medium Ys, and high Ys. There's no relationship; no predictable relationship between X and Y for a correlation that exhibits no relationship at all between the two variables. OK with the background of correlation laid out let's go ahead and take a look at our example. In this example we have the following two variables, hours of media or hours media and college GPA. And what we did here in this hypothetical example is we recorded the number of hours of media during a given week that individuals engaged in. And media could be TV, movies, internet, and so on. So we recorded the number of hours of media that people engaged in, in a given week, and then we also obtained their college GPA and we want to see if there's a relationship between these two variables as measured by Pearson's r our correlation. And if you think about it if somebody watches a lot of media so they're spending let's say an inordinate amount of time watching media whatever form it may take. That's not going to leave them probably sufficient time to attend to their studies. And in that case if we had a lot of hours of media watched that probably would suggest that the GPA may be lower. But if that was true high hours media, low GPA, do you recall kind of correlation coefficient that would be? Well if we use the generic variables X and Y here high on X low on Y so it's an opposite pattern, high on one low on the other, that you may recall is a negative correlation. So it makes sense, at least theoretically speaking, that there could be a negative correlation here. But let's go ahead and run the analysis and see what we find. To run the correlation we go to Analyze, and then Correlate, and then Bivariate Lifetime access to SPSS videos: http://tinyurl.com/m2532td
Views: 180859 Quantitative Specialists
Panel Data Models with Individual and Time Fixed Effects
 
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An introduction to basic panel data econometrics. Also watch my video on "Fixed Effects vs Random Effects". As always, I am using R for data analysis, which is available for free at r-project.org My Website: http://www.burkeyacademy.com/ Link to the data: http://www.burkeyacademy.com/my-forms/Panel%20Data.xlsx Link to previous video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ySTb5Nrhc8g Support this project on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/burkeyacademy Or, a one-time donation on PayPal is appreciated! http://paypal.me/BurkeyAcademy My Website: http://www.burkeyacademy.com/ Talk to me on my SubReddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/BurkeyAcademy/
Views: 200100 BurkeyAcademy
Data cleaning in SPSS
 
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How to find and correct obvious errors using the software SPSS. More information is available on: http://science-network.tv/clean-data-file/
Views: 71017 Science Network TV
Conjoint Analysis in SPSS  (Subtitles Added)
 
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Conjoint Analysis in SPSS Gülin Zeynep Öztaş
Views: 19034 Prof Dr Sabri Erdem
Conducting a Two-Way ANOVA in SPSS
 
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This video demonstrates how to conduct a two-way ANOVA in SPSS. Concepts such as main effects, interaction effects, post hoc tests, pairwise comparisons, Levene’s test, effect size, and statistical significance are described.
Views: 116611 Dr. Todd Grande
Paired Samples t-test - SPSS
 
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I demonstrate how to perform and interpret a paired samples t-test in SPSS. I also point out that many people fail to test the homogeneity of variance assumption in the paired samples t-test, but that this can be done relatively easily with a Pitman-Morgan test. paired t-test
Views: 297693 how2stats
Modern repeated measures analysis using mixed models in SPSS (1)
 
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Repeated measures analyse an introduction to the Mixed models (random effects) option in SPSS. Demonstrates different Covariance matrix types & how to use the Likelihood ratio test to evaluate different models. Robin Beaumont Full notes, MCQ's etc at: www.robin-beaumont.co.uk/virtualclassroom/stats/course2.html
Views: 174884 Robin Beaumont
Conjoint Analysis in SPSS
 
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SPSS training on Conjoint Analysis by Vamsidhar Ambatipudi
Views: 17669 Vamsidhar Ambatipudi
Reliability Analysis
 
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A tutorial on how to conduct a Chronbach's Alpha Reliability Analysis in SPSS/PASW.
Views: 124859 bernstmj
How to analyze your likert scale data in SPSS
 
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This video explains about the analysis steps in SPSS. You can begin with analyzing and transforming your data from ordinal scale to numeric scale using mean() command. Please be informed that these ideas, is just showing to you the ideas of analysis for my students' problem. Therefore, the explanation might not good. If you want the better content and videos, please do visit our channel: http://bit.do/kajidata If you need ideas about data analysis and the way to analyze your data step by steps. Please visit our website and register our online learning platform (for FREE). Website: http://kajidataonline.com/ Online Learning Platform: http://spss.kajidataonline.com/online/ Happy learning.
Views: 39429 Kajidataonline
Simple Slopes Interaction Analysis in SPSS - Complete Tutorial Example
 
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6:54 Sample Data Prep (can skip if using your own data) 19:22 Simple Slopes Analysis Begins 54:47 Plotting the Simple Slopes Learn how to conduct simple slopes analysis when you have a significant interaction, using only SPSS 25 and Excel. I know, I said quickly yet it's an hour long... but hopefully super helpful. Helpful? Please Donate: https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=VNH8WAQ9RF6XU&source=url My complete Linear Regression Class: https://statsfriend.mykajabi.com/p/linear_regression Hire me: https://statsfriend.com More Data Analysis Courses: https://statsfriend.mykajabi.com/
Views: 82 StatsFriend
SPSS - Data Screening Example 1
 
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Recorded: Fall 2015 Lecturer: Dr. Erin M. Buchanan This video covers data screening in SPSS as an overview that can be applied to different analyses types. The video covers examples of the following: - accuracy checks - missing data, mcar, mnar, how to replace - outliers, univariate/multivariate, Mahalanobis - multicollinearity, correlations - normality - linearity - homogeneity/homoscedasticity Lecture materials and assignment available at statstools.com. http://statstools.com/learn/graduate-statistics/ Used in the following courses: Graduate Statistics
Views: 3850 Statistics of DOOM