Home
Search results “Education is an investment in human capital”
The human capital model and the role of education policies
 
19:30
For students at Martin Gustafsson's and Thabo Mabogoane's economics of education course offered to education planners at the School of Education in the University of the Witwatersrand.
Views: 7844 Martin Gustafsson
Human Capital Theory
 
07:02
This video is about Human Capital Theory
Views: 37154 Stefanie Adams
Investing in Human Capital in Cambodia
 
07:26
Underinvestment in education and its low quality, skill mismatch, lack of employment opportunity among youth – these are some of the concerns currently facing Cambodia. They also represent vulnerabilities that could push back into poverty some of the very people who had recently climbed past the poverty line. This is in a nutshell the idea behind this video to help raise awareness of low human capital and its implications for the competitiveness of Cambodia heading toward the full ASEAN Economic Integration at the end of 2015. It also aims to highlight the steps being taken by the Royal Government of Cambodia to address the issue, and UNDP’s work in providing policy support to the government to improve human capital for ensuring sustained poverty reduction and inclusive growth in the future.
Views: 5129 UNDP Cambodia
What is HUMAN CAPITAL? What does HUMAN CAPITAL mean? HUMAN CAPITAL meaning, definition & explanation
 
04:15
✪✪✪✪✪ WORK FROM HOME! Looking for US WORKERS for simple Internet data entry JOBS. $15-20 per hour. SIGN UP here - http://jobs.theaudiopedia.com ✪✪✪✪✪ ✪✪✪✪✪ The Audiopedia Android application, INSTALL NOW - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.wTheAudiopedia_8069473 ✪✪✪✪✪ What is HUMAN CAPITAL? What does HUMAN CAPITAL mean? HUMAN CAPITAL meaning - HUMAN CAPITAL pronunciation - HUMAN CAPITAL definition - HUMAN CAPITAL explanation - How to pronounce HUMAN CAPITAL? Human capital is a term popularized by Gary Becker an economist from the University of Chicago and Jacob Mincer that refers the stock of knowledge, habits, social and personality attributes, including creativity, embodied in the ability to perform labor so as to produce economic value. Alternatively, Human capital is a collection of resources—all the knowledge, talents, skills, abilities, experience, intelligence, training, judgment, and wisdom possessed individually and collectively by individuals in a population. These resources are the total capacity of the people that represents a form of wealth which can be directed to accomplish the goals of the nation or state or a portion thereof. It is an aggregate economic view of the human being acting within economies, which is an attempt to capture the social, biological, cultural and psychological complexity as they interact in explicit and/or economic transactions. Many theories explicitly connect investment in human capital development to education, and the role of human capital in economic development, productivity growth, and innovation has frequently been cited as a justification for government subsidies for education and job skills training. "Human capital" has been and continues to be criticized in numerous ways. Michael Spence offers signaling theory as an alternative to human capital. Pierre Bourdieu offers a nuanced conceptual alternative to human capital that includes cultural capital, social capital, economic capital, and symbolic capital. These critiques, and other debates, suggest that "human capital" is a reified concept without sufficient explanatory power. It was assumed in early economic theories, reflecting the context, i.e., the secondary sector of the economy was producing much more than the tertiary sector was able to produce at the time in most countries – to be a fungible resource, homogeneous, and easily interchangeable, and it was referred to simply as workforce or labor, one of three factors of production (the others being land, and assumed-interchangeable assets of money and physical equipment). Just as land became recognized as natural capital and an asset in itself, human factors of production were raised from this simple mechanistic analysis to human capital. In modern technical financial analysis, the term "balanced growth" refers to the goal of equal growth of both aggregate human capabilities and physical assets that produce goods and services. The assumption that labour or workforces could be easily modelled in aggregate began to be challenged in 1950s when the tertiary sector, which demanded creativity, begun to produce more than the secondary sector was producing at the time in the most developed countries in the world. Accordingly, much more attention was paid to factors that led to success versus failure where human management was concerned. The role of leadership, talent, even celebrity was explored. Today, most theories attempt to break down human capital into one or more components for analysis – usually called "intangibles". Most commonly, social capital, the sum of social bonds and relationships, has come to be recognized, along with many synonyms such as goodwill or brand value or social cohesion or social resilience and related concepts like celebrity or fame, as distinct from the talent that an individual (such as an athlete has uniquely) has developed that cannot be passed on to others regardless of effort, and those aspects that can be transferred or taught: instructional capital. Less commonly, some analyses conflate good instructions for health with health itself, or good knowledge management habits or systems with the instructions they compile and manage, or the "intellectual capital" of teams – a reflection of their social and instructional capacities, with some assumptions about their individual uniqueness in the context in which they work. In general these analyses acknowledge that individual trained bodies, teachable ideas or skills, and social influence or persuasion power, are different.
Views: 16612 The Audiopedia
Investing in People to Build Human Capital
 
01:36
Find out how a country can better prepare for the future by investing in human capital—a population’s health, skills, knowledge, and experience.
Views: 2114 World Bank
Human capital | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
05:57
Basic overview of capital and human capital. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/investment-vehicles-tutorial/investment-consumption/v/return-on-capital?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/investment-vehicles-tutorial/investment-consumption/v/risk-and-reward-introduction?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: When are you using capital to create more things (investment) vs. for consumption (we all need to consume a bit to be happy). When you do invest, how do you compare risk to return? Can capital include human abilities? This tutorial hodge-podge covers it all. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 73195 Khan Academy
Human Capital Formation in India _ Part1 _ Introduction _ Kavya Singhal
 
13:00
Excited to share video lectures from the brightest students at IIT & Delhi University. Learner (www.learner.in) is India's largest platform where Students TEACH Students. Download App at http://bit.ly/2l3zRzq and call us at 011-41082172 to get access code. Lectures based on CBSE syllabus, NCERT Pattern for Class 9th to 12th. Download app from http://app.learner.in or visit website at http://www.learner.in to get more videos, notes & questions.
Views: 30014 learner.in
Human Capital & Conditional Convergence
 
06:42
In our previous macroeconomics video, we said that the accumulation of physical capital only provides a temporary boost to economic growth. Does the same apply to human capital? To answer that, consider this: what happens to all new graduates, in the end? For a while, they’re productive members of the economy. Then age takes its toll, retirement rolls around, and eventually, the old workforce is replaced with a new infusion of people. But then, the cycle restarts. You get a new workforce, everyone’s productive for a while, and then they too retire. Does this ring a bell? It should, because this is similar to the depreciation faced by physical capital. Similarly, are there diminishing returns to education? It likely wouldn’t pay off for everyone to have a PhD, or for everyone to master Einstein’s great theories. That means the logic of diminishing returns, and the idea of a steady state, also applies to human capital. So, now we can revise our earlier statement. Now we can say that the accumulation of any kind of capital, only provides a temporary boost in economic growth. This is because all kinds of capital rust. So, one way or another, we’ll reach a point where new investments can only offset depreciation. It’s the steady state, all over again. However, what does the journey to steady state look like? The Solow model predicts that poor countries should eventually catch up to rich countries, especially since they’re growing from a lower base. And given their quicker accumulation of capital, poorer nations should also grow faster, than their more developed neighbors. And eventually, every country should reach similar steady states. In other words, we would see growth tracks that all eventually converge. So, why isn’t this always the case? Why, in some cases, are we seeing “Divergence, Big time,” as coined by economist Lant Pritchett? The answer to these questions, lies in the institutions of different countries and the incentives they create. Assuming that a certain set of countries do have similar institutions, that’s where we see the convergence predicted by the Solow model. We see that poorer countries do grow faster than their richer counterparts. And conditional on having similar institutions, eventually, even poorer countries will reach a similar steady state of output as more developed nations. We call this phenomenon conditional convergence. You can think of it as a national game of catch-up, with catch-up only happening if institutions don’t differ. What happens though, once all this catching up is done? Let’s not forget that there’s still another variable in the Solow model. This is variable A: ideas -- the subject of our next video. There, we’ll show you how ideas can keep a country moving along the cutting edge of growth. Catch up on the Solow model: Introduction to the Solow model: http://bit.ly/1SMud3G Physical Capital and Diminishing Returns: http://bit.ly/1SpLT31 The Solow Model and the Steady State: http://bit.ly/233vDGw Office Hours video on the Solow model: http://bit.ly/1VQ8XLe Subscribe for new videos every Tuesday! http://bit.ly/1Rib5V8 Macroeconomics Course: http://bit.ly/1R1PL5x Ask a question about the video: http://bit.ly/1NwAtKJ Next video: http://bit.ly/1SHvrdp Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/IR1M/
Education: A Key Human Capital Investment
 
03:47
Earlier this week, Chief Minister Punjab Shehbaz Sharif participated in Panel Discussion with World Bank delegation. The topic under discussion wad educational reforms brought in Punjab by Shehbaz administration. He threw light on the importance of technical/vocational education and the contribution made by Punjab Government in this regard. Women Empowerment Earlier this week, Chief Minister Punjab Shehbaz Sharif participated in Panel Discussion with World Bank delegation. The topic under discussion wad educational reforms brought in Punjab by Shehbaz administration. He threw light on the importance of technical/vocational education and the contribution made by Punjab Government in this regard. Women Empowerment
Views: 202 Shehbaz Sharif
Why is Investing in Education Important -  Education at a Glance 2015 OECD Indicators
 
02:20
Education at a Glance 2015: OECD Indicators is the authoritative source for accurate information on the state of education around the world. It provides data on the output of educational institutions; the impact of learning across countries; the financial and human resources invested in education; access, participation and progression in education; and the learning environment and organisation of schools.
Views: 6510 EduSkills OECD
Human Capital Theory
 
05:15
Made with Doodlecast Pro from the iTunes App Store. http://www.doodlecastpro.com
Views: 6204 Phil Ruder
The Return on Investment of Human Resources | Best practices video by the Top Employers Institute
 
03:01
CEOs often claim that "Our Human Capital is our most important asset...." But if human capital truly is an asset, why doesn't it appear on the balance sheet of organisations? Given the rather intangible character of human capital, HR is often seen as software rather than hardware. The financial impact of the HR strategy is not measured consistently and most research into this topic is rather theoretical. So the main question is: how can you pragmatically measure the Return of investment of your HR policy?
11of19 - Investment in Schooling and Training - Non-monetary benefits of human capital (1of2)
 
01:21:44
GARY BECKER This the eleventh lecture in the "Lectures on Human Capital" series by Gary Becker. This is part 1 of a two-part lecture; see Lecture 12 for part 2 of this lecture. This series of lectures recorded during the Spring of 2010 are from ECON 343 - Human Capital, a class taught every year by Gary Becker at the University of Chicago. In this class, Becker expounds upon the theory of Human Capital that he helped create and for which he won the Nobel Prize. Please see attached lecture notes, video annotations, and reading list for more information. --- Professor Becker explains the limitations of the previous model that tries to explain the decision of going to college. Then, he models the decision of education investment in a more general way with a utility maximizing rational choice model. He offers a two period uncertainty model in which agents invest in their human capital in the first period. He explains how this model can be generalized to N periods. He explains how the human capital that the agent has affects the probability of surviving to the next period. Based on this model, he reinforces the idea of the complementary property between different forms of human capital. Professor Becker also shows how the incentives to invest in education are affected by the probability of surviving to later periods in life. These lectures show how more educated people also have better non-monetary outcomes. Finally, Professor Becker explains why education improves marital prospects and why education improves family earnings. He introduces the gains from marriage to this model. Key concepts: family earnings, full income, leisure, life expectancy, marital prospects, probability of surviving. Main discussions: • Lecture 11, (06:00-09:15): Professor Becker discusses one of his favorite pieces of data on life expectancy and education. He explains how this data evidences that educated people live longer in Russia and Estonia. Also, he claims that this data reveals that educated people fare better through chaotic times. • Lecture 11, (10:40-11:55): Professor Becker talks about a debate that he had with Richard Posner about drunk drivers. • Lecture 11, (13:10-15:05): Professor Becker explains why the returns to college look similar for men and women if the data is correctly interpreted. • Lecture 11, (43:40-45:00): Professor Becker explains why college students take a lot of leisure. • Lecture 11, (01:10:40-01:13:45): Professor Becker explains why utility levels appear in the first order condition when discussing value of life problems. • Lecture 12, (14:15-19:35): Professor Becker discusses the health effects on education and vice versa. He gives some evidences about the differences of these effects across women and men. • Lecture 12, (42:30-45:50): Professor Becker explains the economic returns from studying the liberal arts. Main quotes: • "Education improves you marital prospects ... and more educated people tend to marry other more educated people." • "If you look at anything... educated people are better at it... anything that's considered good.... adaptation to the iPad, is something new (...) I got one (...) I think it's a great piece of equipment." • "Education helps you to adapt better to new environments." References: • Chapter 4: Assortative Mating in Marriage Markets in Becker Gary. A Treatise on the Family. Enlarged ed. pp. 108-134. • Chapter V: Rates of Return form College Education in Becker, Gary. 1974. Human Capital. Third ed. pp. 161-204. -- Lecture Notes: https://mindonline.uchicago.edu/media/ssd/econ/becker/Lecture_Notes-Human_Capital.pdf Reading List: https://mindonline.uchicago.edu/media/ssd/econ/becker/Sp2007readinglist.pdf Video Annotations: https://mindonline.uchicago.edu/media/ssd/econ/becker/Annotations_to-videos-Human_Capital.pdf ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGOytSubscribe About #UChicago: A destination for inquiry, research, and education, the University of Chicago empowers scholars to challenge conventional thinking. Our diverse community of creative thinkers celebrates ideas, and is celebrated for them. #UChicago on the Web: Home: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGO-home News: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGO-news Facebook: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGO-FB Twitter: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGO-TW Instagram: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGO-IG University of Chicago on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/uchicago *** ACCESSIBILITY: If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please email [email protected]
The Human Capital Report
 
03:08
http://www.weforum.org/ A nation's human capital endowment - the skills and capacities that reside in people and that are put to productive use - can be a more important determinant of long term economic success than virtually any other resource. The Human Capital Report details the findings of a new Index which measures countries on their ability to develop and deploy healthy, educated and able workers through four distinct pillars: Education, Health & Wellness, Workforce & Employment and Enabling Environment. 
Views: 20029 World Economic Forum
10.1 Education: Education & Human Capital
 
02:27
10.0 Education, Earnings & the Quality of Life "Human Capital, Financial Capital and Social Capital...combined, these three elements translate into personal and professional flexibility. And it all begins with your educational pursuits..." I begin this four-part segment with a discussion about the concept of personal capital, which I just described, the role that higher education plays in its development as well as the challenges we face today as tuition prices are outpacing the rate of inflation while the dropout rate continues to hover around 50%. From there, it's on to a discussion about school choice, including alternative settings, the merits of the different testing programs for credit, as well as other cost-saving strategies, merit- and need-based scholarships, economical meal plans and the considerations for on- versus off-campus living. In the third and fourth videos, I offer advice about "borrowing the right amount" for college, followed by a a problem-solving exercise that will help you to visualize this concept. M.D. Weiss LLC is neither affiliated with the advertisers that may appear on this page, nor does it endorse their products or services. ©2013 M.D. Weiss LLC. All Rights Reserved.
Views: 1360 Mitchell D. Weiss
Human Capital and Signaling
 
07:13
Wages in America differ greatly among workers. Why is that? One reason includes differences in human capital — tools of the mind. Education is one of the biggest investments people make to increase their human capital. Which college majors offer the greatest returns? And are all returns on education due to human capital? A college degree can “signal” other factors as well, and we discuss what is commonly known as the “sheepskin effect.” In this video, we also discuss how globalization has affected wages in the U.S. Microeconomics Course: http://bit.ly/20VablY Ask a question about the video: http://bit.ly/1LGbE8N Next video: http://bit.ly/1LGbG0p Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/GZRd/ Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/ITR9/ Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/IWJo/
Human Capital Theory
 
01:03
Presentation
Views: 12002 czbaumgardner49
Education and Economic Growth
 
11:05
The relationship between education, jobs and economic growth is the focus of the Developing Human Capital Conference taking place November 17 and 18 in Phoenix. Conference speaker Dr. Michael Mandelbaum discusses his recently published book titled "That Used to Be Us: How America Fell Behind in the World It Invented and How We Can Come Back", and what it says about the ties between education and economic security.
Views: 2225 Arizona PBS
Invest In Me: The Human Capital Project
 
03:04
The #HumanCapital of all children fuels the prosperity of their generation and that of the global economy. That is why building human capital is a project for the world. Find out how we are helping: http://wrld.bg/yQVo30mbLmQ #InvestInPeople
Views: 537715 World Bank
Investing in Human Capital: Skills development & training
 
14:10
Does investing in your employees and developing high level skills set pay off for businesses? We delve into the issue of skill development in the logistics and fleet management space & how Cartrack is enabling and training its stuff in telematics and how MAN Trucks is teaching drivers about technic and skill. Joining CNBC Africa's David Williams for this discussion are Juan Marais, Sales Director at Cartrack and Dean Temlett, Projects Manager, MAN Trucks.
Views: 713 CNBCAfrica
INVESTING​​ in HUMAN CAPITAL
 
16:18
What is HUMAN CAPITAL and WHY is it IMPORTANT to Cambodia? ::Homepage: www.moeys.gov.kh ::Social medias: www.facebook.com/moeys.gov.kh | www.google.com/+moeys | www.twitter.com/moeyscambodia
Role of Education in Economic Development
 
29:12
Subject: Mass Communication and Journalism Course Name: Public Relations/Corporate Communication Keyword: Swayamprabha
What is EDUCATION ECONOMICS? What does EDUCATION ECONOMICS mean? EDUCATION ECONOMICS meaning
 
09:30
What is EDUCATION ECONOMICS? What does EDUCATION ECONOMICS mean? EDUCATION ECONOMICS meaning - EDUCATION ECONOMICS definition - EDUCATION ECONOMICS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Education economics or the economics of education is the study of economic issues relating to education, including the demand for education and the financing and provision of education. From early works on the relationship between schooling and labor market outcomes for individuals, the field of the economics of education has grown rapidly to cover virtually all areas with linkages to education. Investments in human capital entail an investment cost, just as any investment does. Typically in European countries most education expenditure takes the form of government consumption, although some costs are also borne by individuals. These investments can be rather costly. EU governments spent between 3% and 8% of GDP on education in 2005, the average being 5%. However, measuring the spending this way alone greatly underestimates the costs because a more subtle form of costs is completely overlooked: the opportunity cost of forgone wages as students cannot work while they study. It has been estimated that the total costs, including opportunity costs, of education are as much as double the direct costs. Including opportunity costs investments in education can be estimated to have been around 10% of GDP in the EU countries in 2005. In comparison investments in physical capital were 20% of GDP. Thus the two are of similar magnitude. Human capital in the form of education shares many characteristics with physical capital. Both require an investment to create and, once created, both have economic value. Physical capital earns a return because people are willing to pay to use a piece of physical capital in work as it allows them to produce more output. To measure the productive value of physical capital, we can simply measure how much of a return it commands in the market. In the case of human capital calculating returns is more complicated – after all, we cannot separate education from the person to see how much it rents for. To get around this problem the returns to human capital are generally inferred from differences in wages among people with different levels of education. Hall and Jones have calculated from international data that on average that the returns on education are 13.4% per year for first four years of schooling (grades 1–4), 10.1% per year for the next four years (grades 5–8) and 6.8% for each year beyond eight years. Thus someone with 12 years of schooling can be expected to earn, on average, 1.1344 × 1.1014 × 1.0684 = 3.161 times as much as someone with no schooling at all. Economy-wide, the effect of human capital on incomes has been estimated to be rather significant: 65% of wages paid in developed countries is payments to human capital and only 35% to raw labor. The higher productivity of well-educated workers is one of the factors that explain higher GDPs and, therefore, higher incomes in developed countries. A strong correlation between GDP and education is clearly visible among the countries of the world, as is shown by the upper left figure. It is less clear, however, how much of a high GDP is explained by education. After all, it is also possible that rich countries can simply afford more education. To distinguish the part of GDP explained with education from other causes, Weil has calculated how much one would expect each country’s GDP to be higher based on the data on average schooling. This was based on the above-mentioned calculations of Hall and Jones on the returns on education. GDPs predicted by Weil’s calculations can be plotted against actual GDPs, as is done in the figure on the left, demonstrating that the variation in education explains some, but not all, of the variation in GDP. Finally, the matter of externalities should be considered. Usually when speaking of externalities one thinks of the negative effects of economic activities that are not included in market prices, such as pollution. These are negative externalities. However, there are also positive externalities – that is, positive effects of which someone can benefit without having to pay for it. Education bears with it major positive externalities: giving one person more education raises not only his or her output but also the output of those around him or her. Educated workers can bring new technologies, methods and information to the consideration of others. They can teach things to others and act as an example. The positive externalities of education include the effects of personal networks and the roles educated workers play in them.
Views: 1763 The Audiopedia
9of19 - Investment in Schooling and Training - The Labor Market
 
01:24:31
GARY BECKER This the ninth lecture in the "Lectures on Human Capital" series by Gary Becker. This series of lectures recorded during the Spring of 2010 are from ECON 343 - Human Capital, a class taught every year by Gary Becker at the University of Chicago. In this class, Becker expounds upon the theory of Human Capital that he helped create and for which he won the Nobel Prize. Please see attached lecture notes, video annotations, and reading list for more information. --- Professor Becker continues to discuss the model of investment in education introduced in the previous lecture. In this lecture, he carefully lists, describes and analyses each of the parameters involved in the decision that individuals make when going or not to college. He also works through some comparative statics exercises about these parameters. In this lecture, Becker also discusses a number of stylized facts about the labor market for man, women, and minorities including participation rates, wage differentials and how these have changed over time. Key concepts: discount factor, foregone earnings, lifetime earnings differential, life expectancy, return to education, basic facts about the labor market. Main discussions: • Lecture 9, (09:50-10:55): Professor Becker discusses the decision to invest in education. • Lecture 9, (49:05-54:30): Professor Becker discusses the discrimination against women in the marketplace. • Lecture 9, (01:14:00-01:24:25): Professor Becker discusses the development of the wage differential between men and women in the 20th century. References: • Chapter V: Rates of Return from College Education in Becker, Gary. 1974. Human Capital. Third ed. pp. 161-204. • Salvador Navarro Lozano. Notes on Gary Becker's Human Capital and the Economy. pp. 18-21. -- Lecture Notes: https://mindonline.uchicago.edu/media... Reading List: https://mindonline.uchicago.edu/media... Video Annotations: https://mindonline.uchicago.edu/media... ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGOytSubscribe About #UChicago: A destination for inquiry, research, and education, the University of Chicago empowers scholars to challenge conventional thinking. Our diverse community of creative thinkers celebrates ideas, and is celebrated for them. #UChicago on the Web: Home: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGO-home News: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGO-news Facebook: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGO-FB Twitter: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGO-TW Instagram: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGO-IG University of Chicago on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/uchicago *** ACCESSIBILITY: If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please email [email protected]
Education and Economic Growth
 
04:30
Development Economics course: http://mruniversity.com/courses/development-economics-0 Ask a question about the video: http://mruniversity.com/courses/development-economics/education-and-economic-growth#QandA Next video: http://mruniversity.com/courses/development-economics/education-east-asia
Panama 2014 - Investing in Human Capital
 
01:15:10
How can Latin America translate its current demographic bonus into long-term economic success? Dimensions to be addressed: - Investing in healthy workforces - Designing education for employability - Addressing informality through job creation Claudia Belmont, Director, Social Innovation and President, Belcorp, Peru; Young Global Leader Peter Beshar, Executive Vice-President and General Counsel, Marsh & McLennan Companies (MMC), USA; Global Agenda Council on Digital Health Monica Flores, Regional Managing Director, Latin America, ManpowerGroup, Mexico Javier Gerardo Milei, Chief Economist, Corporacion America, Argentina Humberto Luiz Ribeiro, Secretary of Commerce and Services (SCS) of Brazil; Global Agenda Council on Latin America Opening Remarks by Laura Chinchilla, President of Costa Rica Moderated by Ricardo Hausmann, Director, Center for International Development, Harvard Kennedy School, Harvard University, USA; Global Agenda Council on New Economic Thinking
Views: 3232 World Economic Forum
Human Resource Development
 
15:20
Subject:Human Resource Management Paper: Human Resource Management
Views: 15975 Vidya-mitra
How to invest in Human Capital in Africa - Uniciti Education Hub Mauritius
 
39:13
Welcome our speakers Vidia Mooneegan from Ceridian, Chris Rainer from Mari Deal and the Chapter Director in Mauritius and co founder of Talenteum.africa : Nicolas Goldstein
Views: 138 Startup Grind Local
Economics of Development:  (4) Human Capital
 
01:05:21
Economics of Development course at Cardiff Business School 2018/19 (Spring Semester). Follow course page for updates: http://hanomics.com/bs3573 Lecture 4: Human Capital Feb 21 2019 %------------------------------------------------- Human Capital: - sum total of a people's health, education, skills, knowledge, experience, and habits - individuals invest in themselves to improve their own, personal economic returns - governments less interested in investing in human capital - HCI by World bank Oct. 2018 from 0 to 1 %------------------------------------------------- Education: - literature proxied human capital with measures of schooling - schooling does not necessarily mean learning - harmonised learning outcome HLO by World Bank [using learning exchange rate] - flipped gender gap [enrolment vs learning] %------------------------------------------------- Learning and Economic Growth - learning is more strongly associated with growth - sweet spot ( Angrist et al 2019) * investment in human capital is most associated with growth as countries move from the bottom to upper end of middle income status * weak effects at the lowest end of the distribution * human capital is a necessary but not sufficient condition for growth [institutions] %-------------------------------------------------
Views: 36 Hanomics
Human Capital Investment
 
05:03
Human capital investment is the process companies use to develop employees. Businesses invest in employee training to improve business operations, which reduces wasted resources from unskilled workers and increases overall employee efficiency. Companies calculate education/training benefits with a cost-benefit analysis, which analyzes the total cost of improving employee output against the benefits of the investment.
Views: 287 kurd Kurdistan
Right Now, Somewhere…Building Human Capital Through Education
 
02:01
Education helps build the human capital that allows people and societies to thrive. Join us as we explore what’s happening right now, and commit to making this happen everywhere, for everyone.
Views: 1207 World Bank
Invest in Human Capital (2/2)
 
03:29
St. Louis Fed board members talk about the benefits of personal finance and economic education for their communities. More: https://www.stlouisfed.org/annual-report/2016
Is Education an Investment in Human Capital? - Gary Johnson Fair Tax Web Q&A 11-11-11
 
01:34
Full Video @ http://UncensoredTV.net/gary-johnson/?v=n3_8plmw4QA Visit http://UncensoredTV.net to watch videos related to Gary Johnson, Ron Paul, Judge Andrew Napolitano, Peter Schiff, Gerald Celente, Adam Kokesh, Alex Jones, John Stossel and more. Education Invests in Human Capital. Food Is For Consumption but is Prebated. - Gary Johnson Fair Tax Web Q&A 11-11-11 Gary Johnson Yowie Full Online Town Hall Web Q&A Chat - 2011 November 11TH Question & Answer with Gary Johnson 2012 Libertarian Presidential Candidate via Webcam. 11-02 Nov 11 - 2011 November 11TH Gov. Gary Johnson - Online Town Hall - Fair Tax Full Web Q&A (2011-11-11) Income Tax vs Fair Tax Gary Johnson 2012 Ron Paul 2012 Alex Jones Judge Andrew Napolitano Peter Schiff Gerald Celente Adam Kokesh John Stossel Jesse Ventura Mox News Ron Paul, today Grover Norquist Mitt Romney 2012 Rick Santorum 2012 Newt Gingrich 2012 Jeb Bush 2012 Governor Jeb Bush Gov Jeb Bush Gov Mitt Romney Governor Mitt Romney Sen Rick Santorum Senator Rick Santorum Former Speaker Newt Gingrich Congressman Newt Gingrich Rep. Newt Gingrich newt gingrich john king Ron Paul Write In Ron Paul Write-In Gary Johnson Google Plus Hangout Gary Johnson g + Hangout Gary Johnson Webcam Chat fair tax system this month reform ron paul vs flat tax debate explained fair tax system Fair Tax this month Fair Tax reform Fair Tax ron paul Fair Tax vs flat tax fair tax debate fair tax explained Income Tax funny law donald duck commercial swag sappy tutorial illegal income tax fundamentals 2011 ebook Income Tax funny Income Tax law income tax donald duck income tax commercial income tax swag income tax sappy Income Tax tutorial Income Tax illegal Income Tax fundamentals 2011 ebook Gary Johnson beating Gary Johnson brawl Gary Johnson palm bay fight Gary Johnson debate gary johnson beats 16-year-old on tape after son loses a fight gary johnson fight Gary Johnson Ron Paul Gary Johnson 2012 Gary Johnson Channel Gary Johnson johnson beats 16-year-old on tape after son loses a fight Ron Paul beating Channel brawl palm bay fight debate 2012 Ron Paul debate Ron Paul this week ron paul, this week ron paul ad ron paul predictions ron paul what if ron paul maine Ron Paul 2012 Ron Paul today Ron Paul bad lip reading ron paul blr Ron Paul blr maine what if predictions ad this week debate bad lip reading today 2012 Mitt Romney poor people Mitt Romney bad lip reading Mitt Romney glitter bomb mitt romney who let the dogs out mitt romney flip flop Mitt Romney michigan Mitt Romney Singing Mitt Romney bad lip reading mitt romney michigan singing serial killer bad lip reading Mitt Romney poor people bad lip reading glitter bomb who let the dogs out flip flop michigan singing serial killer bad lip reading rick santorum today rick santorum debate rick santorum heavy metal Rick Santorum college Rick Santorum song Rick Santorum booed Rick Santorum ad Rick Santorum bad lip reading rick santorum homosexuality rick santorum black people rick santorum today debate heavy metal college song booed ad bad lip reading homosexuality black people President Ron Paul Supporter Gary Johnson RNC Jan Senator dr rand tv ad Income Fair Tax Phil Henson Plan Freedom Watch Part Write in Write-in G + Google Plus Hangout Channel owned TYT this week Balanced Budget Cut Spending Judge Andrew Napolitano Sara Palin Newt Gingrich Rick Santorum Gov Mitt Romney bad lip reading Rush Limbaugh Sean Hannity Bill Oreilly Jeb Bush cpac GOP Debate Republican Libertarian Party Primary Caucus Poll Peter Schiff Adam Kokesh Alex Jones John Stossel 2012 election
Views: 226 GaryJohnsonChannel
Investing in Human Capital in Cambodia_KH
 
08:53
Underinvestment in education and its low quality, skill mismatch, lack of employment opportunity among youth – these are some of the concerns currently facing Cambodia. They also represent vulnerabilities that could push back into poverty some of the very people who had recently climbed past the poverty line. This is in a nutshell the idea behind this video to help raise awareness of low human capital and its implications for the competitiveness of Cambodia heading toward the full ASEAN Economic Integration at the end of 2015. It also aims to highlight the steps being taken by the Royal Government of Cambodia to address the issue, and UNDP’s work in providing policy support to the government to improve human capital for ensuring sustained poverty reduction and inclusive growth in the future.
Views: 338 UNDP Cambodia
1of19 - Human Capital and Intergeneration Mobility - Introduction
 
01:06:34
GARY BECKER This the first lecture in the "Lectures on Human Capital" series by Gary Becker. This series of lectures recorded during the Spring of 2010 are from ECON 343 - Human Capital, a class taught every year by Gary Becker at the University of Chicago. In this class, Becker expounds upon the theory of Human Capital that he helped create and for which he won the Nobel Prize. Please see attached lecture notes, video annotations, and reading list for more information. --- Professor Becker introduces the course objectives and discusses the main themes covered in his class. The main course subjects covered in the study of Human Capital are: investments in education in an altruistic model, trade-offs between human capital and physical capital investments, intergenerational income mobility, investments in health, marriage markets, fertility, on the job training, specialization and the division of labor, and the division of labor and the extent of the economy. He defines human capital as special because it is inextricably linked to a human being and cannot be separated from her; the "capital" component comes because human capital like physical capital is durable. Becker establishes the main conceptual and practical similarities (i.e. economic return, depreciation, etc.) and differences (i.e. transferability, liquidity, etc.) and similarities between human and physical capital. In this lecture, Becker establishes how he conceives of the study of Human Capital. He says that it is a subject of Economics that ties together micro and macroeconomics. The micro element comes from the link between parents and their children and the macro element because of how human capital is a main determinant of economic growth. Key concepts: altruism with differences in ability, division of labor, education in an altruistic model, fertility, human capital, intergenerational income mobility, investments in health, marriage markets, physical capital, specialization and the division of labor. Main discussions: • Lecture 1, (11:50-13:05): Professor Becker discusses how human capital is involved in the more microeconomic aspects of economic behavior within the family and in the more macroeconomic aspects of economic development. • Lecture 1, (14:45-21:15): Professor Becker explains one of the concepts that he reinforces throughout his class: the complementary between different forms of human capital and its implications. • Lecture 1, (31:35-1:06:00): Professor Becker draws the main similarities and differences between human and physical capitals. Main quotes: • "(...) we'll try to show how by starting at the Micro we can build up a better understanding of what's going to happen at the Macro [level]". References: • Chapter II, Section 1: Human Capital Revisited in Becker, Gary. 1974. Human Capital. Third ed. pp. 15-25. • Salvador Navarro Lozano. Notes on Gary Becker's Human Capital and the Economy. pp. 5-6. -- Lecture Notes: https://mindonline.uchicago.edu/media... Reading List: https://mindonline.uchicago.edu/media... Video Annotations: https://mindonline.uchicago.edu/media... ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGOytSubscribe About #UChicago: A destination for inquiry, research, and education, the University of Chicago empowers scholars to challenge conventional thinking. Our diverse community of creative thinkers celebrates ideas, and is celebrated for them. #UChicago on the Web: Home: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGO-home News: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGO-news Facebook: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGO-FB Twitter: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGO-TW Instagram: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGO-IG University of Chicago on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/uchicago *** ACCESSIBILITY: If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please email [email protected]
Building Human Capital in Africa
 
03:43
Africa is changing on many fronts, and is home to 200 million young people. The time is ripe to build human capital through investments in health, education, and social protection.
Views: 1280 World Bank
How Should You Invest Your Money as a Teenager? (Human Capital vs Financial Capital)
 
14:18
How should you invest your money as a teenager? We'll answer this by explaining the difference between human capital and financial capital, and which you should invest in when you are young. Subscribe here for more content: http://bit.ly/SubscribeMichaelJay We are commonly told that we should begin investing as early as possible to allow are capital to grow and compound over the years. But is this really the best option for teenagers and early 20 year olds who may have other opportunities available? This topic was brought up by a young subscriber named Trent, who asked for advice as a 17 year old. In this video we explore the relationship between our human capital and financial capital, and how the importance of each changes over time. While there is a lot of focus on financial capital, human capital is significantly more important to invest in during the early stages of your life (as a teenager and in your early 20s). The returns from investing in yourself during this time will far exceed returns from any financial investment. Private investing group: http://bit.ly/MichaelsInvestingMembershipGroup (Investing resources) Private email list: http://bit.ly/MichaelJayEmailList (Future discounts) OTHER CONTENT YOU MAY ENJOY BELOW // Value Stocks I'm Watching Series In this series, we will be focusing on value stocks that appear to offer significant upside for long term investors. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xuujRm10u-Q&list=PLNtmr_AnnWdxrbFd9ODrTOn8ie-3hBldP&index=1 // Stock Analysis Series In this series, we will analyze individual stocks so you can understand the business, risks, and value with investing in these companies. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNtmr_AnnWdxIDK13PUiv2gqbfvnabqQp // My Public Stock Portfolio Series In this series, I grow my Robinhood investment account from $10 to $10,000, build a portfolio of value stocks, and document the entire process for you to see! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0hAjDu8NZn4&list=PLNtmr_AnnWdyATMMH5B-MAFWqicUb5zFj&index=1 DISCLAIMER: This video is a resource for educational and general informational purposes and does not constitute actual financial advice. No one should make any investment decision without first consulting his or her own financial advisor and/or conducting his or her own research and due diligence. There is no guarantee or other promise as to any results that may be obtained from using this content. Investing of any kind involves risk and your investments may lose value. CREDITS Outro: https://soundcloud.com/kevatta/vibin-kevatta-x-saib Saib: https://soundcloud.com/saib_eats Kevatta: https://soundcloud.com/kevatta This video: https://youtu.be/ysCpnktMnVE This channel: http://bit.ly/MichaelJayInvesting Michael Jay - Value Investing
2of19 - Human Capital, and Intergenerational Mobility - The basic model (1of2)
 
01:21:29
GARY BECKER This the second lecture in the "Lectures on Human Capital" series by Gary Becker. This series of lectures recorded during the Spring of 2010 are from ECON 343 - Human Capital, a class taught every year by Gary Becker at the University of Chicago. In this class, Becker expounds upon the theory of Human Capital that he helped create and for which he won the Nobel Prize. Please see attached lecture notes, video annotations, and reading list for more information. --- Professor Becker models the investment in the human capital that parents make on behalf of their children. He analytically develops a simple one-overlapping generation rational choice model in which the parents can only spend income on their own consumption goods or in the human capital investment of their children. He then derives the comparative statics predictions that are implied. These results set up a discussion about intergenerational income mobility and regression to the mean in this context. Finally, he begins to discuss capital markets and their imperfections. Throughout the discussion, Becker assumes the following: a single kind of human capital investment, one-parent household (i.e. no marriage or unisex model), and a one-child household. The parameters in this model are the altruism and the income of the parents, and the parameter that converts the human capital of the kids into earnings. Common microeconomic theory assumptions about utility and production functions are settled. Key concepts: altruism, capital markets, capital markets imperfections, consumption goods, intergenerational income mobility, investment in human capital, one-overlapping generation rational choice model. Main discussions: • Lecture 2, (06:00-09:25): Professor Becker provides context for the model he develops. • Lecture 2, (14:00-15:10, and 17:10-19:40): Professor Becker explains the meaning of parental altruism in his model. • Lecture 2, (23:50-26:00): Professor Becker discusses why diminishing marginal returns of human capital investment is a reasonable assumption. • Lecture 2, (29:00-30:50): Professor Becker explains how the future earnings of the kids are determined and the role played by the parameters in the function that converts a child's human capital into earnings. • Lecture 2, (01:01:50-01:06:50): Professor Becker starts the discussion about intergenerational income mobility and regression to the mean in this context. • Lecture 2, (01:12:20-01:14:10): Professor Becker stresses the difference between intergenerational income mobility and income equality. • Lecture 2, (02:15:50-01:02:20): Professor Becker discusses capital markets and its imperfections. Main quotes: • "(...) if the world was full of selfish parents we can close up this part of the analysis and go home". References: • Chapter 1: Single-Person Households in Becker Gary. A Treatise on the Family. Enlarged ed. pp. 20-30. • Salvador Navarro Lozano. Notes on Gary Becker's Human Capital and the Economy. pp. 7-11. -- Lecture Notes: https://mindonline.uchicago.edu/media... Reading List: https://mindonline.uchicago.edu/media... Video Annotations: https://mindonline.uchicago.edu/media... ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGOytSubscribe About #UChicago: A destination for inquiry, research, and education, the University of Chicago empowers scholars to challenge conventional thinking. Our diverse community of creative thinkers celebrates ideas, and is celebrated for them. #UChicago on the Web: Home: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGO-home News: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGO-news Facebook: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGO-FB Twitter: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGO-TW Instagram: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGO-IG University of Chicago on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/uchicago *** ACCESSIBILITY: If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please email [email protected]
I’m a Human Capital Champion
 
02:18
Human capital a key driver of economic growth, ending extreme poverty and creating more inclusive societies. That is why investing in people is our collective duty. Hear some of the world’s leading voices on human capital share their views on why investments in nutrition, quality health care, education, jobs and skills are critical.
Views: 1920 World Bank
Teaching the Human Capital Model
 
10:13
Teaching the Human Capital Model, and if college is worth it?
Views: 1270 Paul Thorne
4of19 - Human Capital, and Intergenerational Mobility - Human capital transmission in the family
 
01:16:33
GARY BECKER This the fourth lecture in the "Lectures on Human Capital" series by Gary Becker. This series of lectures recorded during the Spring of 2010 are from ECON 343 - Human Capital, a class taught every year by Gary Becker at the University of Chicago. In this class, Becker expounds upon the theory of Human Capital that he helped create and for which he won the Nobel Prize. Please see attached lecture notes, video annotations, and reading list for more information. --- Professor Becker introduces a new parameter in the model that he introduced in Lecture 2 and Lecture 3: the human capital of the parents. He explains in which situation this model adjusts accurately to real world situations. Thus, he begins the crucial discussion and modeling of how human capital of parents affects the human capital of their children. Also, he defines and points out the recursive property of human capital. Then, Becker discusses the microeconomic and macroeconomic consequences of such a property. He introduces and explains a technical and economic property of the household production function: the complementary property between investment of human capital of the kids and human capital of the parents. Furthermore, he explains how the human capital of the parents influences the rate of return of investments in human capital. Finally, he points out the implications for intergenerational income mobility in this new context. Key concepts: complementary between human capital investment of parents and their children, human capital of the parents, intergenerational income mobility, rate of return, recursive property of human capital, rate of return. Main discussions: • Lecture 4, (1:10-07:50): Professor Becker explains the technical and economic consequences of introducing the human capital of the parents as a parameter of the model developed in Lecture 2 and Lecture 3. He links this explanation to the recursive property of human capital. The explanations of the microeconomic and macroeconomic consequences of such a property are done in this part of the clip too. • Lecture 4, (09:20-11:10): Professor Becker emphasizes the properties of the household production function spanned by the human capital of the parents. • Lecture 4, (15:10-17:40): Professor Becker explains the economic growth consequences of human capital investment in kids. • Lecture 4, (01:02:00-01:10:00): Professor Becker analyzes the trade-off between equity and efficiency in the model developed in this lecture. Main quotes: • "I remember when I was going into Kindergarten... I was worried if I'll be able to learn the alphabet (...) you worry about that sometimes." • "(...) every theory is tested by how well it helps you understanding the world..." • "The production of human capital is intensive in human capital." References: • Salvador Navarro Lozano. Notes on Gary Becker's Human Capital and the Economy. pp. 11-13. • Chapter X: Human Capital and the Rise and Fall of Families in Becker, Gary. 1974. Human Capital. Third ed. pp. 257-298. -- Lecture Notes: https://mindonline.uchicago.edu/media... Reading List: https://mindonline.uchicago.edu/media... Video Annotations: https://mindonline.uchicago.edu/media... ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGOytSubscribe About #UChicago: A destination for inquiry, research, and education, the University of Chicago empowers scholars to challenge conventional thinking. Our diverse community of creative thinkers celebrates ideas, and is celebrated for them. #UChicago on the Web: Home: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGO-home News: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGO-news Facebook: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGO-FB Twitter: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGO-TW Instagram: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGO-IG University of Chicago on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/uchicago *** ACCESSIBILITY: If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please email [email protected]
Malaysia: Investing in Human Potential
 
03:13
A child born today in Malaysia will reach only 62% of his or her potential in productivity and lifetime income. In order to boost human capital development for the future, Malaysia will need to invest in education, healthcare and social protection systems. This is key to paving the way for the country to join the ranks of inclusive, high-income nations.
Views: 1170 World Bank
The Education and Human Capital Requirements Roundtable
 
06:00
The McGraw-Hill Research Foundation and United States Council Foundation Issued a White Paper Exploring New Approaches to Lifelong Learning for the 21st Century.
Views: 629 McGrawHillResearch
Education as Investment for HRD
 
29:13
This video is from the paper - Historical, Political and Economic Perspectives of Education
Views: 512 NCERT OFFICIAL
10of19 - Investment in Schooling and Training - Higher education and College
 
01:28:12
GARY BECKER This the tenth lecture in the "Lectures on Human Capital" series by Gary Becker. This series of lectures recorded during the Spring of 2010 are from ECON 343 - Human Capital, a class taught every year by Gary Becker at the University of Chicago. In this class, Becker expounds upon the theory of Human Capital that he helped create and for which he won the Nobel Prize. Please see attached lecture notes, video annotations, and reading list for more information. --- Professor Becker continues to elaborate on the decision to attend college. He also discusses hypotheses for why the cost of tuition has risen. Becker then discusses the consequences of this rise in tuition and how it affects the cost functions of different industries. He explains why many people misunderstand the causation of the rise in tuition and illustrates what he believes are the correct forces. He discusses how the recursive property of human capital is present in this context. Also, he explains why students have a better deal in these days than they had in the past. He questions if college subsidization causes a progressive taxing structure. He claims that the benefits of going to college are mostly private ones and illustrates why there are not large externalities associated with college education. He gives a theoretical and an empirical discussion about the college/high school wage gap in the U.S. He offers facts of other developed and developing countries as well. He also dicusses the extremely negative consequences of dropping out of high school: "high school drop outs are socially condemned in almost every dimension". Finally, he explains why people drop out. Key concepts: benefits of going to college, high school drop out, externalities from education, sheepskin effect, subsidies to education, rising cost of college tuition. Main discussions: • Lecture 10, (13:15-09:40): Professor Becker discusses the misunderstandings about the causes of the rise in tuition and gives some insights about the recursive property of human capital in this context. Also, he discusses issues about subsidies and externalities in the context of investment in education. • Lecture 10, (17:40-24:00): Professor Becker recommends some public policies in order to get more people to finish high school in an efficient way. • Lecture 10, (26:15-27:45): Professor Becker explains why GED programs do not work. Main quotes: • "You have an increase not only in the earnings of college graduates relative to high school graduates but you have an increase in the net benefits... the rate of return ... of the college education, despite the increase in tuition. So, I don't feel sorry for the students who have to pay this higher tuition". References: • Chapter V: Rates of Return form College Education in Becker, Gary. 1974. Human Capital. Third ed. pp. 161-204. • Salvador Navarro Lozano. Notes on Gary Becker's Human Capital and the Economy. pp. 18-21. -- Lecture Notes: https://mindonline.uchicago.edu/media/ssd/econ/becker/Lecture_Notes-Human_Capital.pdf Reading List: https://mindonline.uchicago.edu/media/ssd/econ/becker/Sp2007readinglist.pdf Video Annotations: https://mindonline.uchicago.edu/media/ssd/econ/becker/Annotations_to-videos-Human_Capital.pdf ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGOytSubscribe About #UChicago: A destination for inquiry, research, and education, the University of Chicago empowers scholars to challenge conventional thinking. Our diverse community of creative thinkers celebrates ideas, and is celebrated for them. #UChicago on the Web: Home: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGO-home News: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGO-news Facebook: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGO-FB Twitter: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGO-TW Instagram: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGO-IG University of Chicago on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/uchicago *** ACCESSIBILITY: If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please email [email protected]
Rewards of early childhood investment | FT World
 
04:40
► Subscribe to the Financial Times on YouTube: http://bit.ly/FTimeSubs The FT’s Martin Sandbu discusses investment in human capital with Jim Heckman, the Nobel-winning economist who has demonstrated the link between early childhood years and inequality. For more video content from the Financial Times, visit http://www.FT.com/video Twitter https://twitter.com/ftvideo Facebook https://www.facebook.com/financialtimes
Views: 804 Financial Times
Model for Change: Investing in Human Capital
 
45:20
How can we harness our human potential to rise to the challenges of the 21st century? With voices on disaster relief, girls education, human centered design in agriculture, and tech solutions for global health, this session features: Jake Wood, Co-Founder and CEO, Team Rubicon Dolores Dickson, Regional Executive Director, Camfed West Africa Debbie Aung Din, Co-Founder, Proximity Designs Josh Nesbit, CEO, Medic Mobile Catherine Cheney, West Coast Correspondent, Devex Jake Wood is cofounder and CEO of Team Rubicon, the only nonprofit disaster response organization that utilizes the skills of military veterans to rapidly deploy emergency response teams. In giving veterans an opportunity to continue their service, Team Rubicon provides them with a sense of purpose, community and identity. Since the organization’s founding in 2010 following the massive Haiti earthquake, Team Rubicon has responded to over 100 disasters and grown from eight to 35,000 volunteer members. Under Wood’s leadership, the organization has responded following the tornado in Joplin, Missouri, Hurricane Sandy, the tornado in Moore, Oklahoma, Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines, the 2014 wildfire in Pateros, Washington, and the 2015 earthquakes in Nepal. As a Sergeant in the United States Marine Corps, Wood deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan as a Scout Sniper and earned the Navy-Marine Commendation Medal. A leading veterans’ advocate, Wood has briefed President Obama on veterans’ issues, met with former Presidents Bush and Clinton on veteran transition and disaster response and testified before a Senate committee to improve mental health care services for returning veterans. He has also appeared in the major media, including MSNBC, CNN, NBC, ABC, Al Jazeera, US News & World Report, Forbes, Fox News and penned an op-ed for The New York Times. In 2014, Crown Publishing published Wood’s book, Take Command: Lessons in Leadership.Wood has received numerous awards including: Chronicle of Philanthropy’s “40 Under Forty”; Goldman Sachs “100 Most Intriguing Entrepreneurs” award; and was selected as a CNN Hero in 2012. Dolores Dickson has over 15 years’ experience as an international development practitioner. She has worked with the UN’s Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC), where she conducted socio-economic research for the UN advisory committee for Guinea Bissau and with the British Red Cross in the UK. Dolores joined Camfed in 2007.Since her appointment as Executive Director, the Ghana program has grown substantially in reach and influence. High-level dialog with the Ministry of Education is ensuring that Camfed’s approach is being implemented widely. Dolores sits on Ghana’s National Education Sector Working Group, and is a member of the Advisory Council of the UN SDG Philanthropy Platform in Ghana. She holds an MA in Development Studies from the University of Manchester, UK, as well as Executive Education Certificates from Harvard University, USA. Debbie Aung Din is Co-founder of Proximity Designs, a non-profit social enterprise operating in Myanmar since 2004. Proximity designs, makes and sells products and services that provide a path out of poverty for rural families. These include small farm technologies and irrigation devices, rural financial services, and farm advisory services. Proximity operates a full-scale design lab in Yangon. Products are designed for extreme affordability and typically boost productivity and incomes by over $250, so families can afford basic necessities. Proximity has customers using products and services in over 9,000 villages in 175 townships across Myanmar. Josh was an undergraduate student when he began working at St. Gabriel’s Hospital in rural Malawi. He observed patients walking up to 100 miles to see the hospital’s single doctor and community health workers walking over 30 miles to deliver updates on patients. He also observed stronger cell phone reception in the Malawian rural village than back home in California. The next time he returned to the hospital, he was carrying a suitcase of $10 Nokia phones. The impact of communication and better support for frontline health workers was clear. He joined forces with co-founder Isaac Holeman, and Medic Mobile was born.
Views: 100 Skoll.org