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Covalent Bonding | #aumsum
 
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Covalent Bonding. Noble gases have complete outer electron shells, which make them stable. The coming together and sharing of electron pairs leads to the formation of a chemical bond known as a covalent bond. Two chlorine atoms come together and share their electrons to form a molecule of chlorine. In this way, each atom will have eight electrons in its valence shell. As a single pair of electrons is shared between them, the bond is known as a single covalent bond. A single covalent bond is represented by a single dash between the atoms. When two oxygen atoms come together, they each share 2 electrons to complete their octets. Since they share two pairs of electrons, there is a double bond between the oxygen atoms. Similarly, Nitrogen atoms share a triple covalent bond to form a molecule of Nitrogen.
Views: 1432280 It's AumSum Time
Atomic Hook-Ups - Types of Chemical Bonds: Crash Course Chemistry #22
 
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Atoms are a lot like us - we call their relationships "bonds," and there are many different types. Each kind of atomic relationship requires a different type of energy, but they all do best when they settle into the lowest stress situation possible. The nature of the bond between atoms is related to the distance between them and, like people, it also depends on how positive or negative they are. Unlike with human relationships, we can analyze exactly what makes chemical relationships work, and that's what this episode is all about. If you are paying attention, you will learn that chemical bonds form in order to minimize the energy difference between two atoms or ions; that those chemical bonds may be covalent if atoms share electrons, and that covalent bonds can share those electrons evenly or unevenly; that bonds can also be ionic if the electrons are transferred instead of shared: and how to calculate the energy transferred in an ionic bond using Coulomb's Law. -- Table of Contents Bonds Minimize Energy 01:38 Covalent Bonds 03:18 Ionic Bonds 05:37 Coulomb's Law 05:51 -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 1780508 CrashCourse
Introduction to Ionic Bonding and Covalent Bonding
 
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This crash course chemistry video tutorial explains the main concepts between ionic bonds found in ionic compounds and polar & nonpolar covalent bonding found in molecular compounds. This video contains plenty of notes, examples, and practice problems. Here is a list of topics: 1. Ionic Bonds - Transfer of Valence Electrons 2. Electrostatic Force of Attraction In Ionic Bonding 3. Ionic Compounds - Metals and Nonmetals 4. Molecular Compounds - 2 or More Nonmetals 5. Polar Covalent Bonding - Unequal Sharing of Electrons 6. Nonpolar Covalent Bonds - Equal Sharing of Electrons 7. Polarized Compounds - Dipole Moment and Charge Separation 8. Electronegativity and Charge Distribution 9. Metal Cations vs Nonmetal Anions
Chemistry: What is a Covalent Bond? (Polar and Nonpolar)
 
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Chemistry: What is a Covalent Bond? (Polar and Nonpolar) Covalent bonds are one of the 3 main types of intramolecular forces, along with ionic bonds and metallic bonds. Covalent bonds are the result of atoms sharing their valence electrons. Covalent bonds can be polar or nonpolar, depending on the electronegativies of the atoms involved in the bond. We show five examples of covalent bonds using Lewis dot structure notation: HF, CO2, H2, H2O and CCl4. You can click on the links below to jump to sections in the lesson: 0:28 Definition of a Covalent Bond 0:42 Example 1: HF (single covalent bond) 1:23 Example 2: CO2 (double covalent bond) 2:09 Nonpolar covalent bonds 2:20 Example 3: H2 2:43 Polar covalent bonds 2:48 Example 4: H2O 3:58 Example 5: CCl4 4:39 Pauling Bond Polarity Scale (Linus Pauling) 5:15 Do covalent bonds break apart in water? (electrolytes) Click to watch our video about ionic bonds: http://bit.ly/1UWsJRL Click to see our video about metallic bonds: http://bit.ly/1UoASiZ And here's our video comparing ionic and covalent bonds: http://bit.ly/1Nz4Kpy Intermolecular Forces: http://bit.ly/2xAnoMt ///////////////////////// Essential Chemistry Lessons help all year long: What is a Mole? Avogadro's Number: http://bit.ly/2laJh0S Molar Mass: http://bit.ly/2pNfg8L Scientific Notation: http://bit.ly/2cv6yTw Significant Figures: http://bit.ly/2b1g3aJ Unit Conversion 1: http://bit.ly/1YGOQgw Unit Conversion 2: http://bit.ly/1RGbwZ1 Periodic Table: http://bit.ly/2gmSWfe ///////////////////////// Our Periodic Table app is FREE in the Google Play store! http://goo.gl/yg9mAF Don't miss our other chemistry videos: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aQw9G... Please Subscribe so you'll hear about our newest videos! http://bit.ly/1ixuu9W If you found this video helpful, please give it a "thumbs up" and share it with your friends! ///////////////////////// To support more videos from Socratica, visit Socratica Patreon https://www.patreon.com/socratica http://bit.ly/29gJAyg Socratica Paypal https://www.paypal.me/socratica We also accept Bitcoin! :) Our address is: 1EttYyGwJmpy9bLY2UcmEqMJuBfaZ1HdG9 ///////////////////////// We recommend the following books: Brown and LeMay Chemistry: The Central Science 13th edition: http://amzn.to/2n5SXtB 14th edition: http://amzn.to/2mHk79f McGraw/Hill Chemistry by Chang & Goldsby http://amzn.to/2mO2khf Uncle Tungsten: Memories of a Chemical Boyhood by Oliver Sacks http://amzn.to/2nlaJp0 Napoleon's Buttons: How 17 Molecules Changed History http://amzn.to/2lJZzO3 ///////////////////////// Written and Produced by Kimberly Hatch Harrison About our instructor: Kimberly Hatch Harrison received degrees in Biology and English Literature from Caltech before working in pharmaceuticals research, developing drugs for autoimmune disorders. She then continued her studies in Molecular Biology (focusing on Immunology and Neurobiology) at Princeton University, where she began teaching as a graduate student. Her success in teaching convinced her to leave the glamorous world of biology research and turn to teaching full-time. Kimberly taught AP Biology and Chemistry at an exclusive prep school for eight years. She is now the head writer and producer of Socratica Studios.
Views: 183481 Socratica
Chemical Bonding - Ionic vs. Covalent Bonds
 
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This two minute animation describes the Octet Rule and explains the difference between ionic and covalent bonds. Find more free tutorials, videos and readings for the science classroom at ricochetscience.com
Views: 267173 RicochetScience
Ionic and covalent bonding animation
 
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Ionic bonding formed when one atom has sufficient strength of attraction to remove ion from the other atom. Covalent bonding occurs when neither atom has sufficient strength to remove the other atom's electron. They would instead share electrons to form stable configurations of electrons.
Views: 1243576 kosasihiskandarsjah
Lewis Diagrams Made Easy: How to Draw Lewis Dot Structures
 
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For a limited time get 10% off all my Teespring Merch. Use the promo code: KETZ10 Please consider supporting me on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/ketzbook This is a Videoscribe tutorial on how to draw Lewis diagrams for elements and simple molecules. Lewis diagrams (aka Lewis structures, Lewis dot structures, Lewis dot diagrams) are useful because they use simple drawings to show how atoms share valence electrons in molecules, polyatomic ions, and other covalent structures. This is my first tutorial in the series. Please also see the second video in my Lewis diagram series: https://youtu.be/qwqXAlvNxsU For simple molecules, follow these 5 steps: 1) count all the valence electrons 2) put the singular atom in the middle 3) draw in single bonds 4) put remaining electrons in as lone pairs 5) give every atom an octet or duet by turning lone pairs into double or triple bonds as needed My goal is to make chemistry easier ;) http://ketzbook.com
Views: 1005663 ketzbook
Covalent Bonding of Hydrogen, Oxygen & Nitrogen | Chemistry for All | The Fuse School
 
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Learn the basics about the covalent bonding of hydrogen, oxygen and nitrogen as a part of the overall topic of properties of matter. The noble gas structure and covalent bonding is also discussed. SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. JOIN our platform at www.fuseschool.org This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind The Fuse School. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Carbon and its Compounds | Bonding in Carbon | Covalent Bonds
 
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CBSE Class 10 Science - Carbon and its Compounds - What is covalent bonding and why Carbon shares electrons? What are Electrovalent and Covalent compounds and difference between them? Atoms can share, gain or Loose electrons to stable their Octates. So the compounds formed by gain or loss of electrons is called as the electrovalent compound and covalent compounds are formed by sharing of electrons. Carbon has an atomic number of 6 and its electronic configuration will be 2 and 4. So to be stale carbon has to either loss 4 electrons or gain 4 electrons. So the carbon shares the electrons with other atoms. So Covalent bonding is mutual sharing of electrons so as to achieve a stable electronic configuration. Hence carbon has co-valency of 4 and will be tetravalent. About PrepOngo: Best Online Learning App which provides CBSE class 10 interactive video lectures, NCERT solutions, written study material, solved examples, in chapter quizzes and practice problems for Science (Physics, Chemistry, Biology) and Mathematics. We try to help the students understand lessons by visualising the concepts through illustrative and interactive videos, practice from large question banks and evaluate and improve yourself continuously. Online Live courses are also offered for CBSE boards, JEE Mains, JEE-Advanced, NEET and Board preparation for class 10, 11 and 12 For all CBSE class 10 Science and Maths video lectures download the Android App: https://goo.gl/HJwkhw Subscribe to our YouTube Channel: https://goo.gl/KSsWP2
Views: 52594 PrepOnGo
How Does Water Bond - Covalent Bonds | Chemistry for All | FuseSchool
 
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Learn the basics about the covalent bonding of water, when learning about covalent bonding within properties of matter. Water is made from one oxygen atom and two hydrogens. The oxygen has 6 electrons in its outer shell, but it really wants to have 8 to have a full shell. The hydrogens have one outer shell electron, but want to have two. The atoms share their electrons, forming covalent bonds. So all three atoms have full outer shells, and create a water molecule. Water has two covalent bonds. In water, the bonding electrons spend most of their time nearer the oxygen atom, because it is more ELECTRONEGATIVE. This means that it is electron withdrawing. As the negatively charged electrons are nearer the oxygen atom, the oxygen atom becomes a little bit negative itself, while the hydrogens become a little positive. This is called delta positive and delta negative. Water doesn’t just have any old covalent bonds; it has what we call POLAR COVALENT bonds and is a POLAR molecule. This is really important as it affects how water behaves and reacts with other elements. SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. JOIN our platform at www.fuseschool.org This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind The Fuse School. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
What Are Covalent Bonds | Chemistry for All | FuseSchool
 
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Learn the basics about covalent bonds, when learning about properties of matter. When similar atoms react, like non-metals combining with other non-metals, they share electrons. This is covalent bonding. Non-metals have shells of electrons that are normally half or more than half full of electrons. Since they have a strong attraction for a few additional electrons, it is energetically unfavourable for any of them to lose electrons, so they share electrons by overlapping orbitals. This makes a bonding orbital, or covalent bond, that contains two or more electrons. Covalent bonds can be represented by a dot and cross diagram. These diagrams show only the valence electrons. Covalent bonds are directional, which means they are in a fixed position. The overlap between orbitals mean that the atoms in covalent bonds are very close, and make covalent bonds strong. There are two kinds of covalent structure - small molecules, like water, and giant compounds, like diamond. The electrons in the bonds are evenly shared, which means the bonds are not polarised; there is little attraction between molecules, and forces between molecules are weak. Compounds made from small covalent molecules have low melting and boiling points and are volatile. They also don’t conduct electricity. Carbon and silicon tend to form giant covalent compounds. These bond in the same way, but instead of forming small molecules with one or two bonds, they form four, make up huge lattices or chains of many many linked up atoms. Diamond is a common example, and is made up of Carbon. These compounds have very high melting and boiling points because you have to break covalent bonds rather than intermolecular forces to make them free enough to act like liquids or gases. The covalent bonds hold them rigidly in place in the giant lattice. SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. JOIN our platform at www.fuseschool.org This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind The Fuse School. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Ionic, covalent, and metallic bonds | Chemical bonds | Chemistry | Khan Academy
 
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Introduction to ionic, covalent, polar covalent and metallic bonds. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/chemical-bonds/types-chemical-bonds/v/electronegativity-trends?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/periodic-table/periodic-table-trends-bonding/v/metallic-nature-trends?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Chemistry on Khan Academy: Did you know that everything is made out of chemicals? Chemistry is the study of matter: its composition, properties, and reactivity. This material roughly covers a first-year high school or college course, and a good understanding of algebra is helpful. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy is a nonprofit with a mission to provide a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We believe learners of all ages should have unlimited access to free educational content they can master at their own pace. We use intelligent software, deep data analytics and intuitive user interfaces to help students and teachers around the world. Our resources cover preschool through early college education, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, economics, finance, history, grammar and more. We offer free personalized SAT test prep in partnership with the test developer, the College Board. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 100 million people use our platform worldwide every year. For more information, visit www.khanacademy.org, join us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter at @khanacademy. And remember, you can learn anything. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Chemistry channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyEot66LrwWFEMONvrIBh3A?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 2334516 Khan Academy
Double and Triple  Covalent Bonds
 
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Learn how electrons are formed in a double and triple bond.
Views: 39596 The Science Classroom
Chemical Bonding Covalent Bonds and Ionic Bonds
 
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Chemical Bonding Covalent Bonds and Ionic Bonds. Mr. Causey discusses ionic bonds, covalent bonds and chemical bonding. You need to know the periodic table, valence electrons, lewis dot symbols, oxidation numbers and electronegativity in order to determine chemicals bonds. http://www.yourCHEMcoach.com Subscribe for more chemistry videos: http://bit.ly/1jeutVl Basic Rules - 0:56 Valence Electrons - 1:10 Electronegativity - 1:18 Chemical Bonding - 1:46 Ionic Bond - 2:58 Covalent Bond - 4:00 Compound Characteristics - 6:26 Name that Bond - 7:50 Thinking Time - 8:57 Share this Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KjoQHqgzda8 Resources: Polyatomic Ion Cheat Sheet: http://bit.ly/14e2pbw Periodic Table: http://bit.ly/ptable9 Related Videos: Related Videos: Naming Ionic and Covalent Compounds: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9XUsOLaz3zY Metallic Bonding: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3uNETGK_sb4 Molecular Geometry: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-pq2wum1uDc Intermolecular Forces: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wYZg1j7o2x4 Contact Me: [email protected] Follow Me: http://www.twitter.com/#!/mrcausey http://pinterest.com/mistercausey/ http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=814523544
Views: 287096 Mr. Causey
How Covalent Bonds Form
 
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A description of how carbon and hydrogen share electrons to form a covalently bonded compound.
Views: 11852 BioBunn
Energy Levels, Electrons, and Covalent Bonding
 
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Watch an overview of Lesson 4.4 featuring molecular model animations showing the process of covalent bonding. An activity is also explained in which a 9-volt battery and pencils are used to show that water is composed of two gases but that there is more of one gas than the other. Connections to the NGSS are also highlighted. Subscribe! http://bit.ly/AmerChemSOc Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/ChemMatters Twitter! https://twitter.com/ACSChemMatters For more information, please visit our website: https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education.html You might also like: Reactions – Food Chemistry: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vjj2OJBOQ_0&list=PLtLT74crQcwXifCszpuk21I4ye3ghf-kV ChemMatters: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G0O87gWv-Xk&list=PLB6A2947FFC507110 Kids Chemistry: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y1TNrdyqhcY&list=PLLG7h7fPoH8L6LPoixsIPby70O5SajE5z Your Science ABCs: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vHqbxuVZua4&list=PLLG7h7fPoH8IaoEnq6IKRxkZRVY5Fvt2m Produced by the American Chemical Society, the world’s largest scientific society. ACS is a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related information and research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences. Join the American Chemical Society! https://bit.ly/Join_ACS
How to Draw Covalent Bonding Molecules
 
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http://www.sciencetutorial4u.com This video explains how to draw covalent molecules and compounds. Contents: 0:08 Introduction 0:39 H2 1:25 HCl 2:23 Cl2 3:18 CH4 4:27 NH3 5:37 H2O 6:52 O2 7:57 N2 Thank you for watching. Please like, subscribe and share this video: https://youtu.be/_v8C1W0ChVM INTRODUCTION 0:08 Covalent bonding happens between non-metals. The electrons are shared between the non-metal atoms. This bonding allow atoms to have full outer shell of electrons. Only the electrons in the outer shell take part in the bonding. The number of electrons in the outer shell can be found out using the group in the periodic table. H2 0:39 Hydrogen is in group 1 so it has one electron in the outer shell. Hydrogen molecules have single bond which means they have two electrons in the overlap. HCl 1:25 Chlorine is in group 7 so it has seven electrons in the outer shell. HCl has single bond so it has two electrons in the overlap. Cl2 2:23 Chlorine is in group 7 so it has seven electrons in the outer shell. Cl2 (Chlorine molecule) has single bond so it has two electrons in the overlap. CH4 3:18 Carbon is in group 4 so it has four electrons in the outer shell. Methane has four single bonds. NH3 4:27 Nitrogen is found in group 5 so it has 5 electrons in the outer-shell. The Nitrogen atom is surrounded by three Hydrogen atoms, each providing one electron in the sharing (overlap). So Ammonia has 3 single bonds. H2O 5:37 Oxygen is found in group 6 so it has 6 electrons in the outer shell. Water has 2 single bonds. O2 6:52 Oxygen molecules have double bonds. Oxygen atom is found in group 6 so it has 6 electron in the outer shell. Therefore, in the overlap there are 2 pairs of electrons (which is 4 electrons in the overlap). This leads O2 molecules to have one double bond. N2 7:57 Nitrogen molecules have triple bonds. Nitrogen is found in group 5 so it has 5 electrons in the outer-shell. In the overlap, there are 3 pairs of electrons which are 6 electrons in the overlap. This causes Nitrogen molecules to have one triple bond. How to draw Ionic Bonds Teaching Video: https://youtu.be/ek-AN5K3AlI Ionic and Covalent bonds Teaching video: https://youtu.be/wQ3NJUKKcTU How to draw electron shell Teaching video: https://youtu.be/vuVNkQwSggo
Views: 69640 sciencetutorial4u
Valence electrons and bonding | Periodic table | Chemistry | Khan Academy
 
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How to get Lewis structures from electron configuration, and how valence electrons are involved in forming bonds. Created by Jay. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/periodic-table/periodic-table-trends-bonding/v/atomic-radius-trend?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/periodic-table/copy-of-periodic-table-of-elements/v/periodic-table-transition-metals?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Chemistry on Khan Academy: Did you know that everything is made out of chemicals? Chemistry is the study of matter: its composition, properties, and reactivity. This material roughly covers a first-year high school or college course, and a good understanding of algebra is helpful. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Chemistry channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyEot66LrwWFEMONvrIBh3A?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 472893 Khan Academy
Polar Covalent Bonds and Nonpolar Covalent bonds, Ionic Bonding - Types of Chemical Bonds
 
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This chemistry video tutorial provides a basic introduction into the types of chemical bonds such as polar covalent bonds, nonpolar covalent bonds and ionic bonds. It discusses the difference between ionic bonding and covalent bonding. Ionic bonds can be identified by looking for a metal combined with a nonmetal. Covalent bonds typically occur among 2 or more nonmetals. Covalent bonding involves a sharing of electrons and ionic bonding forms as a result of a transfer of electrons from the metal to the nonmetal producing ions with opposite charge which are attracted to each other. The electrostatic force of attraction produces the ionic bond that holds the cations and anions together. Polar covalent bonds have unequal sharing of electrons between the atoms where as nonpolar covalent bonding have a relatively equal sharing of electrons between the atoms attached to the bond. Polar covalent bonds typically have an electronegativity difference of 0.5 or more where as nonpolar covalent bonds have a value difference of 0.4 or less. This video contains plenty of examples and practice problems. New Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&t=25s&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BWziAvOKdqsMFSB_MyyLAqS&index=1 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/
Covalent Bonding in Carbon Dioxide | Chemistry for All | FuseSchool
 
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Carbon dioxide is a product of one of the most important chemical reactions in the world: combustion. Combustion is how a lot of people in the world heat their homes and power their cars. It also unfortunately contributes to the greenhouse effect and global warming. The carbon dioxide molecule is formed from one carbon atom and two oxygens. As an element, carbon only has 4 outer shell electrons and oxygen 6. Double covalent bonds form between the atoms, where two electrons from each atom are shared making 4 bonding electrons in total. The two groups of bonding electrons in carbon dioxide repel each other and this keeps the oxygen atoms as far away from each other as possible. Carbon dioxide is less reactive than water because it has two bonds with each oxygen. This means you need a lot more energy to break the atoms apart. Carbon dioxide's strong double bonds make it very stable and so whenever there are stray carbon and oxygen atoms flying about, they love to get together and form carbon dioxide. Like water, the bonds in carbon dioxide are POLAR COVALENT, making the carbon atom delta positive and the oxygens delta negative. Although, unlike water, carbon dioxide is not a polar molecule overall. SUBSCRIBE to the FuseSchool YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. VISIT us at www.fuseschool.org, where all of our videos are carefully organised into topics and specific orders, and to see what else we have on offer. Comment, like and share with other learners. You can both ask and answer questions, and teachers will get back to you. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find all of our Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRnpKjHpFyg&list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Find all of our Biology videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjkHzEVcyrE&list=PLW0gavSzhMlQYSpKryVcEr3ERup5SxHl0 Find all of our Maths videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hJq_cdz_L00&list=PLW0gavSzhMlTyWKCgW1616v3fIywogoZQ Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the FuseSchool platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
4.2 Describe how the covalent bond is formed via electron sharing [SL IB Chemistry]
 
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Atoms may share electrons to obtain a full outer shell with other atoms. The resulting molecules are more stable. Atoms may share one electron each = covalent bond. Sharing 2 each is a double bond, 3 each is a triple bond. If one atom shares 2 electrons and the other shares none that is called a dative (or coordinate) covalent bond. The hydronium ion, ammonium ion and carbon monoxide all contain a dative covalent bond. Pyro's arm grew back at respawn!
Views: 55298 Richard Thornley
Covalent Bonding
 
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Follow us at: https://plus.google.com/+tutorvista/ Check us out at http://chemistry.tutorvista.com/physical-chemistry/covalent-bonding.html What is Covalent Bonding A covalent bond is a form of chemical bonding that is characterized by the sharing of pairs of electrons between atoms, and other covalent bonds. In short, the attraction-to-repulsion stability that forms between atoms when they share electrons is known as covalent bonding. Covalent bonding includes many kinds of interaction, including σ-bonding, π-bonding, metal to metal bonding, agostic interactions, and three-center two-electron bonds. The term covalent bond dates from 1939.The prefix co- means jointly, associated in action, partnered to a lesser degree, etc.; thus a "co-valent bond", essentially, means that the atoms share "valence", such as is discussed in valence bond theory. In the molecule H2, the hydrogen atoms share the two electrons via covalent bonding. Covalency is greatest between atoms of similar electronegativities. Thus, covalent bonding does not necessarily require the two atoms be of the same elements, only that they be of comparable electronegativity. Although covalent bonding entails sharing of electrons, it is not necessarily delocalized. Furthermore, in contrast to electrostatic interactions ("ionic bonds") the strength of covalent bond depends on the angular relation between atoms in polyatomic molecules. Covalent bonds are affected by the electronegativity of the connected atoms. Two atoms with equal electronegativity will make non-polar covalent bonds such as H-H. An unequal relationship creates a polar covalent bond such as with Cl-H. Please like our facebook page http://www.facebook.com/tutorvista
Views: 59930 TutorVista
Covalent Bonding
 
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019 - Covalent Bonding In this video Paul Andersen explains how covalent bonds form between atoms that are sharing electrons. Atoms that have the same electronegativity create nonpolar covalent bonds. The bond energy and bond length can be determined by graphing the potential energy versus the distance between atoms. Atoms that share electrons unequally form nonpolar covalent bonds. Music Attribution Title: String Theory Artist: Herman Jolly http://sunsetvalley.bandcamp.com/track/string-theory All of the images are licensed under creative commons and public domain licensing: "Electronegativities of the Elements (data Page)." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia, August 10, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Electronegativities_of_the_elements_(data_page)&oldid=565034286. "File:Covalent Bond Hydrogen.svg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Covalent_bond_hydrogen.svg. "File:Halit-Kristalle.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Halit-Kristalle.jpg. "File:Hydrogen-chloride-3D-vdW.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Hydrogen-chloride-3D-vdW.png. "File:Magnesium Crystals.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Magnesium_crystals.jpg. "File:Methane-3D-space-filling.svg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Methane-3D-space-filling.svg. "File:Nitrogen-3D-vdW.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Nitrogen-3D-vdW.png. "File:Oxygen Molecule.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Oxygen_molecule.png. "File:Periodic Trends.svg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Periodic_trends.svg. "File:Periodic Trends.svg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Periodic_trends.svg. "File:Sugar 2xmacro.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Sugar_2xmacro.jpg.
Views: 197106 Bozeman Science
BONDING IN CARBON THE  COVALENT BOND
 
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For accessing 7Activestudio videos on mobile Download SCIENCETUTS App to Access 120+ hours of Free digital content. For more information: http://www.7activestudio.com [email protected] http://www.7activemedical.com/ [email protected] http://www.sciencetuts.com/ Contact: +91- 9700061777, 040-64501777 / 65864777 7 Active Technology Solutions Pvt.Ltd. is an educational 3D digital content provider for K-12. We also customise the content as per your requirement for companies platform providers colleges etc . 7 Active driving force "The Joy of Happy Learning" -- is what makes difference from other digital content providers. We consider Student needs, Lecturer needs and College needs in designing the 3D & 2D Animated Video Lectures. We are carrying a huge 3D Digital Library ready to use. Carbon–carbon bond. A carbon–carbon bond is a covalent bond between two carbon atoms. The most common form is the single bond: a bond composed of two electrons, one from each of the two atoms. ... Carbon atoms can also form double bonds in compounds called alkenes or triple bonds in compounds called alkynes.
Views: 10231 7activestudio
Covalent Bonding! (Definition and Examples)
 
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Covalent bonding is one of the two main types of bonding. Because it’s about sharing electrons, most of the time atoms involved in covalent bonding will have no charges. FREE Practice Problems! 🍏 http://robinreaction.com LET ME be your online tutor! 🍎 https://www.robinreaction.com/tutoring Need more help? Check out some of my playlists! My Bonding Tutorials: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V4-ljSnCA78&list=PLWKN1q9XKBhxT0RePkb2hibgOw5vZ0CMp My Science Tutorials: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IdYiEKh_P4M&list=PLWKN1q9XKBhyFIgXQOm8dv_dhtgRjFeSn Protons, Neutrons, and Electrons: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QRdkQ6SFhQw&list=PLWKN1q9XKBhwMrShxFJrMSulAH8IF1_Ej My Balancing Tutorials: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V9J3LzWGlaQ&list=PLWKN1q9XKBhx6zKa8lEkqTkR8jnCim31i My Mole Tutorials: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WEQNjXAQQg4&list=PLWKN1q9XKBhztE2CmvAVBe34knNYAKiJh My Naming Tutorials: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j4u1DEFPBJk&list=PLWKN1q9XKBhx-HqP7JWvT9knG1jjwqz4D 🍉 Subscribe to my channel! 🍉 https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCN2sk9BZ-f5GaiTK-fGDByQ?sub_confirmation=1 I'm Robin Reaction! My goal is to help you understand chemistry by breaking down difficult concepts into pieces you can understand. I've taught thousands of students and no matter how much you're struggling, I promise you can learn this stuff if you dedicate yourself to learning it and get help from the right people!
Views: 8720 Robin Reaction
Basic Chemistry for Biology Part 4: Covalent Bonding and Structural Formulas
 
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This video series, Basic Chemistry for Biology Students, teaches the basic chemistry that you’ll need to know in your biology course, whether that’s introductory high school level, AP Biology, or even a first year college biology course. The series covers 1. The structure of atoms (a nucleus with protons and neutrons; electrons orbiting outside in orbitals) 2. What biology students need to know about the Periodic Table. 3. The “Octet Rule” for understanding how electrons are organized into orbitals. 4. Ionic bonding (how atoms trade electrons to become charged ions, and the ionic bonds that result) 5. Covalent bonding (how atoms share electrons to form molecules) Key chemistry terms (element, compounds, molecules, etc). 6. Understanding chemical formulas (molecular formulas and structural formulas). Each video is tightly linked to tutorials at http://www.sciencemusicvideos.com/basic-chemistry-tutorials/
Views: 27380 sciencemusicvideos
Dogs Teaching Chemistry - Chemical Bonds
 
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I am a chemist and my greatest hobby is to train my dogs...why not combine the two?! Paige's facebook- http://www.facebook.com/PaigetheBorderCollie Dexter's facebook - http://www.facebook.com/theDexterDog Contact us! [email protected] Music: "East Side Bar" by Josh Woodward - http://www.joshwoodward.com/ .................................................................................................. Chemical bonds are what hold atoms together. A chemical bond is an attraction between atoms that allows the formation of chemical substances. The electrons that participate in chemical bonds are the valence electrons, which are the electrons found in an atom's outermost shell. An ionic bond is formed when one of the atoms will lose its electron to the other atom. This results in a positively charged ion, called an cation. and negatively charged ion, called an anion. Positive and negative attract! The result is ionic bond. Covalent chemical bonds involve the sharing of a pair of valence electrons by two atoms There are also what is called Polar Covalent Bonds. These are Covalent bonds in which the sharing of the electron pair is unequal. The result is a bond where the electron pair is displaced toward the more electronegative atom.
Views: 1240670 snuggliepuppy
Ionic and Covalent Bonds Made Easy
 
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Simple explanation of Ionic and Covalent Bonds music from bensound.com sunny day from soundbible.com wind from soundbible.com
Views: 92050 Got Science?
Covalent Bonding in Water, Methane, Ammonia & Hydrogen Fluoride | Chemistry for All | FuseSchool
 
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In this video we will look at covalent bonds in methane, ammonia, water and hydrogen fluoride. They are small, covalently-bonded molecules. The atoms within them share electrons because they have half full or more than half full valence shells of electrons: they are non-metals. Methane is a fuel, ammonia is used in household cleaners, water is a drink and the essence of life, and hydrogen fluoride is used to etch glass. The bonding in methane, ammonia, water and hydrogen fluoride shows a pattern: methane is carbon bonded to four hydrogen atoms; ammonia is nitrogen bonded to three hydrogen atoms; water is oxygen bonded to two hydrogen atoms, and hydrogen fluoride is fluorine bonded to just one hydrogen atom. Carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and fluorine appear in the periodic table in this order, moving along the second row from left to right. Carbon has four out of eight electrons in its outer shell, so makes four covalent bonds. Nitrogen has five out of eight electrons in its outer shell, so can make three covalent bonds to make the shell full. Oxygen has 6 electrons in its outer shell. It can bond with two hydrogen atoms to share 2 more electrons. It now has a full outer shell of 8 electrons. Ammonia has two electrons, called a lone pair of electrons, occupying the fourth position. These electrons take up space. Because electrons are negatively charged, lone pairs repel bonds even more strongly than bonds repel each other. This makes ammonia less symmetric than methane. The water molecule is bent in shape. Oxygen has two lone pairs. Negatively charged lone pairs are slightly attracted to the hydrogen atoms, so there is a weak attraction between molecules. Forces between molecules are a little stronger in water than in ammonia or methane. Water is liquid at room temperature and pressure, whilst ammonia a gas that is easily liquefied, and methane is a gas. Intermolecular forces are normally very weak in covalent compounds, but in water they are just strong enough to keep it liquid. A bit more energy is needed to overcome these forces and boil it. If water were not a liquid, life as we know it would be completely different! Ethanol contains carbon and oxygen bonding. The carbon atoms always form four bonds and the oxygen forms two. Remember, carbon forms 4 bonds, nitrogen forms 3 bonds and has one lone pair of electrons, and oxygen forms two bonds and looks bent. SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. JOIN our platform at www.fuseschool.org This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind FuseSchool. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
VSEPR Theory: Introduction
 
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To see all my Chemistry videos, check out http://socratic.org/chemistry This is an introduction to the basics of VSEPR Theory. VSEPR theory is a set of rules for how to look at a Lewis structure and determine the three dimensional (3D) shape of a molecule. The shapes have to do with the location of bonds and lone electrons pairs. In this video, we'll look at the following shapes: linear, trigonal planar, bent, tetrahedral, and trigonal bipyramidal
Views: 1725444 Tyler DeWitt
Polar Covalent Bonds
 
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Polar covalent bonds result from eneven sharing of electrons. Learn how to predict if a bond will be polar or nonpolar in this video.
Views: 155992 The Science Classroom
Chemistry – Covalent bond, Bond pair and Lone pair  - Chemical Bonding – Part 4 - English
 
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This part 2 of Covalent bond lessons. This videos explains nature of covalent bond ,how covalent bond is formed, structure of molecule which has multiple covalent bonds etc. About us: We are a social enterprise working on a mission to make school learning interesting, relevant and affordable to every child on this planet. You can watch our FREE online videos at http://www.bodhaguru.com/watch and download our practice application/games - just visit http://www.bodhaguru.com/play If you like our videos, subscribe to our channel http://www.youtube.com/user/BodhaGuruLearning. Feel free to connect with us at http://www.facebook.com/BodhaGuru OR http://twitter.com/Bodhaguru Have fun, while you learn. Thanks for watching -- Team BodhaGuru
Views: 10388 Bodhaguru
What is a Coordinate Covalent Bond?
 
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This chemistry video tutorial provides a basic introduction into coordinate covalent bond. Line any covalent bond, electrons are shared. However, in a coordinate covalent bond, one atom donates both electrons that contribute to the formation of the bond. A lewis acid lewis base reaction can form a coordinate covalent bond as well as metal ligand interactions. New Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&t=25s&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BWziAvOKdqsMFSB_MyyLAqS&index=1 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/
Covalent Bond - Animated Presentation
 
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A covalent bond is a form of chemical bonding that is characterized by the sharing of pairs of electrons between atoms. The stable balance of attractive and repulsive forces between atoms when they share electrons is known as covalent bonding. Covalent bonding includes many kinds of interaction, including σ-bonding, π-bonding, metal-to-metal bonding, agostic interactions, and three-center two-electron bonds.[2][3] The term covalent bond dates from 1939.[4] The prefix co- means jointly, associated in action, partnered to a lesser degree, etc.; thus a "co-valent bond", in essence, means that the atoms share "valence", such as is discussed in valence bond theory. In the molecule H2, the hydrogen atoms share the two electrons via covalent bonding. Covalency is greatest between atoms of similar electronegativities. Thus, covalent bonding does not necessarily require the two atoms be of the same elements, only that they be of comparable electronegativity. Although covalent bonding entails sharing of electrons, it is not necessarily delocalized. Furthermore, in contrast to electrostatic interactions ("ionic bonds") the strength of covalent bond depends on the angular relation between atoms in polyatomic molecules.Polarity of covalent bonds Covalent bonds are affected by the electronegativity of the connected atoms. Two atoms with equal electronegativity will make non-polar covalent bonds such as H-H. An unequal relationship creates a polar covalent bond such as with H-Cl. Subdivision of covalent bonds There are three types of covalent substances: individual molecules, molecular structures, and macromolecular structures. Individual molecules have strong bonds that hold the atoms together, but there are negligible forces of attraction between molecules. Such covalent substances are gases. For example, HCl, SO2, CO2, and CH4. In molecular structures, there are weak forces of attraction. Such covalent substances are low-boiling-temperature liquids (such as ethanol), and low-melting-temperature solids (such as iodine and solid CO2). Macromolecular structures have large numbers of atoms linked in chains or sheets (such as graphite), or in 3-dimensional structures (such as diamond and quartz). These substances have high melting and boiling points, are frequently brittle, and tend to have high electrical resistivity. Elements that have high electronegativity, and the ability to form three or four electron pair bonds, often form such large macromolecular structures
Views: 81196 Animation Devastation
IB Chemistry Topic 4.2 Covalent bonding
 
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IB Chemistry Topic 4.2 Covalent bonding How to determine if a compound is covalent or ionic (degree of covalent character), how polar the covalent bond is and if the molecule itself is polar. A look also into the strength of the covalent bond. PPTs and quizzes are available on http://www.mrwengibchemistry.com/ 0:16 Covalent bond definition 1:41 van Arkel-Ketelaar Triangle of Bonding 3:25 Polarity 5:26 Bond strengths PPT direct link: https://mix.office.com/watch/5dz16vtfdrhp Free online SL Quiz: http://www.proprofs.com/quiz-school/story.php?title=NzYzNzIxVS2G Free online HL Quiz: http://www.proprofs.com/quiz-school/story.php?title=NzYzNzIyLP0P 4.2. Covalent bonding SL • A covalent bond is formed by the electrostatic attraction between a shared pair of electrons and the positively charged nuclei. • Single, double and triple covalent bonds involve one, two and three shared pairs of electrons respectively. • Bond length decreases and bond strength increases as the number of shared electrons increases. • Bond polarity results from the difference in electronegativities of the bonded atoms. • Deduction of the polar nature of a covalent bond from electronegativity values. Connect with me: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/IBChemistry2016/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/andrewweng0406 Google plus: https://plus.google.com/u/0/108611113268141564345 Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/mrandrewweng040/ib-chemistry/
Views: 14171 Andrew Weng
What Are Dot and Cross Diagrams - Part 1 | Chemistry for All | FuseSchool
 
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Learn the basics about how to use dot and cross diagrams to represent covalent bonds. Dot and cross diagrams are simply a straightforward way of drawing the electrons in the orbitals of atoms and compounds. Most of the time, we use dots to represent electrons in orbitals. The electrons in the outer shell, the outer electrons, are known as valence electrons. These are the electrons that react. Atoms can bond as long as there is space in their outer shell to fit in more electrons. Dot and cross diagrams provide a useful way to keep track of where electrons come from, as the electrons from the original atoms are represented using dots and then you can represent foreign electrons with crosses. Or in reverse: the original atom electrons with crosses and the foreign electron with dots. Covalent bonding occurs when an atom doesn’t have the electrostatic force to steal another atom’s electrons like happens with ionic bonds. Instead, they share electrons. Dots and crosses are used to distinguish between neighbours in a bond, not between different elements. So the electrons of one oxygen may be represented with dots, and another oxygen's electrons with crosses. SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. JOIN our platform at www.fuseschool.org This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind FuseSchool. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Types Of Chemical Bonds - What Are Chemical Bonds - Covalent Bonds And Ionic Bonds - What Are Ions
 
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In this video we discuss how chemical bonds are formed, we cover ionic bonds and covalent bonds. Chemical bonding is important in many different functions of the body. Transcript and notes The interactions of 2 or more atoms mainly occur at the outermost shell, or energy level. The result of these interactions results in a chemical reaction. In atoms that have fewer or more than 8 electrons in their outermost energy level, reactions occur that result in the loss, gain, or sharing of electrons with another atom to satisfy the octet rule. The octet rule means that elements tend to combine so that each atom has 8 electrons in its outermost shell. This results in the formation of structures such as crystals or molecules. Two atoms of oxygen can combine with one atom of carbon to form carbon dioxide or CO2. There are two main types of chemical bonds, ionic bonds and covalent bonds. Ionic bonds are bonds where the transfer of electrons takes place. Let’s see how this type of bond works. So, here we have a sodium atom, which has an atomic number of 11, meaning it has 11 protons in its nucleus and 11 electrons in its shells or energy levels. Shell one has 2 electrons, shell 2 has 8 electrons and shell 3 has 1 electron. And here we have a chlorine atom, which has an atomic number of 17, so 17 protons and 17 electrons. It has 2 electrons in shell one, 8 in shell 2 and 7 in shell 3. We know that atoms want to have 8 electrons in their outer shell, so Sodium can give up one electron, and now it has 8 electrons in its outer shell, and chlorine can take that electron from sodium and that will give it 8 electrons in its outer shell. Since the sodium atom gave up an electron it now has 11 protons, which are positively charged, and 10 electrons which are negatively charged. This results in the formation of a sodium ion with a positive charge. An ion is an atom or molecule with a net electrical charge due to the loss or gain of an electron. Since the chlorine atom gained an electron, and now has 17 protons and 18 electrons, it is a chlorine ion with a negative charge. The positively charged sodium ion is now attracted to the negatively charged chlorine ion, and NaCl or table salt is formed. This is an ionic bond. So, ionic bonding is when an electron transfer takes place and generates 2 oppositely charged ions. Now for covalent bonds. Covalent bonds are chemical bonds that are formed by the sharing of one or more pairs of electrons by the outer energy levels or shells of two atoms. The 4 major elements of the body, carbon, oxygen, hydrogen and nitrogen almost always form covalent bonds by sharing electrons. So, for instance, 2 hydrogen atoms can bond by sharing a pair of electrons. Hydrogen is one of the exceptions to the octet rule of having 8 electrons in the outer shell, because it only has one shell. Let’s look at carbon dioxide or co2 again, which form a covalent bond. Oxygen has an atomic mass of 8, so 8 protons, and 8 electrons, 2 in its inner shell and 6 in its outer shell, so, oxygen atoms want 2 more electrons for their outer shell. Carbon has an atomic mass of 6, 6 protons and 6 electrons, 2 in the inner shell and 4 in the outer shell, so it wants 4 more electrons for its outer shell. They can make each other happy by sharing what they have. Oxygen atom number 1 can share 2 of its electrons and the carbon atom can share 2 of its electrons with oxygen atom number one, making oxygen atom number one happy. And oxygen atom number 2 can come in and like oxygen atom number one it can share two of its electrons and the carbon atom has 2 more of its own electrons that it can share with oxygen atom number 2. So now all 3 atoms are happy. By sharing 2 pairs of electrons in this situation a double bond has been formed, and double bonds are important in chemical reactions.
Views: 5477 Whats Up Dude
Covalent Bonding
 
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Covalent bonds form when nonmetals react with other nonmetals to from chemical compounds. Covalent bonds results from these elements sharing their electrons. Please Like and Subscribe. Learning more science at www.thescienceclassroom.org
Views: 16096 The Science Classroom
4.2 Covalent bonding (SL)
 
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Understandings: A covalent bond is formed by the electrostatic attraction between a shared pair of electrons and the positively charged nuclei. Single, double and triple covalent bonds involve one, two and three shared pairs of electrons respectively. Bond length decreases and bond strength increases as the number of shared electrons increases.
Views: 10657 Mike Sugiyama Jones
4.2 Covalent bond is an electrostatic attraction [SL IB Chemistry]
 
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4.2.1 Describe the covalent bond as the electrostatic attraction between a pair of electrons and positively charged nuclei. Elements with a high electronegativity will tend to share electrons when they bond -- since they both "love" electrons. Electrons may pair up in between the atomic nuclei to form a covalent bond. The positive nuclei have an electrostatic (opposite charges attract) attraction to the pairs. More pairs of electrons means more of an attraction and therefore stronger (multiple) bonds.
Views: 38138 Richard Thornley
Ionic Bonding Introduction
 
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To see all my Chemistry videos, check out http://socratic.org/chemistry This video is an introduction to ionic bonding, which is one type of chemical bonding. Ionic bonds hold together metal and nonmetal atoms. In ionic bonding, electrons are transferred from a metal atom to a nonmetal atom, creating ions. These ions have opposite charge, so they stick together. Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC
Views: 1071869 Tyler DeWitt
Lewis Dot Structures for Covalent Compounds - Part 1 CLEAR & SIMPLE
 
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Lewis Dot Structures for Covalent Compounds - Part 1 - This awesome video shows how to draw lewis dot structures for covalent compounds. Step by step instruction is provided on how to draw these molecular lewis dot structures. In order to fully understand this video, you'll need to know how to determine the number of valance electrons an element has. You'll find that these molecules also have single, double and triple covalent bonds.Thanks for tuning in. Peace.
Views: 173849 sciencepost
The CHEMICAL BONDS Song  - NOW WITH CLOSED CAPTION SO YOU CAN SING ALONG!  Mr. Edmonds  -
 
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This song is about the formation of the two types of chemical bonds: IONIC BONDS and COVALENT BONDS. The tune is to "Dancing Queen" by Abba (the song from their album, Arrival). After looking for several song melodies, this one fit the words the best. Many thanks to my current and former science students for their encouragement! Document with words is in "Docs" section for dsecms on Teachertube, OR BELOW: The Chemical Bonds Song -- to the tune of "Dancing Queen" by Abba from the album Arrival. Words by Doug Edmonds. Oooh yeah, Ionic bonds ... covalent bonds ... both of them chemical bonds. How are they made? What's the dif-ference? Watch you'll see! First we'll start with ionic bonds, A metal and nonmetal are involved. The metal gives over electrons, the nonmetal ... it receives. The atoms become IONS! Metals might have 1,2 or 3 Electrons for the nonmetal to receive It all depends on what's needed, to make the number 8 For the nonmetals' outer shell. AND IF IT HAPPENS FOR THEM ... They both become IONS ...... CHARGED ATOMS .... They become IONS! The metal's positive, the nonmetal's negative, They become IONS, oh yeah. The metal's plus, the nonmetal minus, and opposites they do attract. So what you get, when they come together, is an IONIC BOND. So what about those covalent bonds? It's not about loss and gain of electrons. Valence electrons they are shared, to complete the outer shells Of the nonmetals set to bond. IT'S WHEN NONMETALS JOIN ... to make covalent bonds With shared electrons ,,,, they're covalent bonds. Not a transfer, instead they share valence electrons, oh yeah! Ionic bonds ... covalent bonds ... both of them chemical bonds. How are they made? What's the dif-ference? Play the song again ! Ionic bonds, covalent bonds ..... both chemical bonds!
Views: 215115 dsecms
Electron Displacement in Covalent Bond - Basic Principle and Techniques in Organic Chemistry
 
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Electron Displacement in Covalent Bond Video Lecture from Basic principles and techniques in organic chemistry Chapter of Chemistry Class 11 for HSC, IIT JEE, CBSE & NEET. Watch Previous Videos of Chapter Basic principles and techniques in organic chemistry:- 1) Concept of Mechanism of an Organic Reaction - Basic Principle and Techniques in Organic Chemistry - https://youtu.be/wQcqrsOVWQA 2) Representation of Electron Movement - Basic Principle and Techniques in Organic Chemistry - https://youtu.be/C_32MZCQf84 Watch Next Videos of Chapter Basic principles and techniques in organic chemistry:- 1) Inductive Effect - Basic Principle and Techniques in Organic Chemistry - Chemistry Class 11 - https://youtu.be/ri4LUuRNDlE 2) Electromeric Effect - Basic Principle and Techniques in Organic Chemistry - Chemistry Class 11 - https://youtu.be/DE7CJFNUUI8 Access the complete playlist of Chapter Basic principles and techniques in organic chemistry:- http://gg.gg/Basic-principles-and-techniques-in-organic-chemistry Access the complete playlist of Chemistry Class 11:- http://gg.gg/Chemistry-Class-11 Subscribe to Ekeeda Channel to access more videos:- http://gg.gg/Subscribe-Now #ChemistryClass11 #ChemistryClass11JEE #ChemistryClass11Lectures #ChemistryClass11Tutorial #OnlineVideoLectures #EkeedaOnlineLectures #EkeedaVideoLectures #EkeedaVideoTutorial Thanks For Watching. You can follow and Like us on following social media. Website - http://ekeeda.com Parent Channel - https://www.youtube.com/c/ekeeda Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/ekeeda Twitter - https://twitter.com/Ekeeda_Video LinkedIn- https://www.linkedin.com/company-beta... Instgram - https://www.instagram.com/ekeeda_/ Pinterest - https://in.pinterest.com/ekeedavideo You can reach us on [email protected] Happy Learning : )
Views: 1187 Ekeeda
Ionic Bonds, Polar Covalent Bonds, and Nonpolar Covalent Bonds
 
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This organic chemistry video tutorial explains how to identify a bond as an ionic bond, polar covalent bond, or a nonpolar covalent bond. Ionic bonds usually consist of metals and nonmetals where as covalent bonds consists of nonmetals. In a nonpolar covalent bond, electrons are shared equally and the electronegativity difference between the two atoms is 0.4 or less. For polar covalent bonds, the electrons are shared unequally between the two atoms and the electronegativity difference is defined to be 0.5 or more. Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEWpbFLzoYGPfuWUMFPSaoA?sub_confirmation=1 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/ New Organic Chemistry Playlist https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6unef5Hz6SU&index=1&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BXP7TUO7656wg0uF1xYnwgm&t=0s
Polar Covalent, Nonpolar Covalent & Ionic Bonds
 
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This video is Awesome! Understand Bonding Like Never Before. Polar Covalent, Nonpolar Covalent & Ionic Bonds - This video shows how to determine the type of bond that will form based on electronegativity values. The difference in electronegativity values result in the bond being ionic, non polar covalent or polar covalent. Ionic bonds result from the transfer of electrons, polar covalent from the uneven sharing of electrons and non polar covalent bonds from the even sharing of electrons. Tune in for the video on Polar Molecules.
Views: 131397 sciencepost
Oxygen, Nitrogen & Carbon and Covalent Chemical Bonds
 
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This chemistry tutorial video explains how oxygen, nitrogen & carbon make covalent chemical bonds to school & science students . The video shows how the protons and electron shells, and especially the number of electrons in the outer shells determine how many bonds oxygen, nitrogen and carbon can make. Four important molecules, water H2O, ammonia NH3, and methane CH4 are discussed. Subscribe to watch more online chemistry courses & science videos: http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiX8pAYWBppIbtUZTfGnRJw?sub_confirmation=1 About Atomic School: Atomic School supports the teaching of Atomic Theory to primary school & science students . We provide lesson plans, hands-on classroom resources, demonstration equipment, quizzes and a Teacher's Manual to primary school teachers. Animated videos that clearly explain the scientific ideas supports learning by both teachers and students. As a teacher, you don't have to look anywhere else to implement this program. Our work has been verified by science education researchers at the University of Southern Queensland, Dr Jenny Donovan and Dr Carole Haeusler, who confirm that primary students are capable of learning much more complex scientific concepts than previously thought, and crucially, that they love it. Students run to class! The program has been trialed in Australian schools as well as schools in the Philippines, Iran and India. It is conducted as holiday workshops at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, the Queensland Museum as well as the World Science Festival. It has attracted wide media interest, including TV, radio and print, and the research data has been presented at prestigious American Education Research Association and Australian Science Education Research Association conferences. Atomic Theory underlies all the other sciences- genetics, electronics, nanotechnology, engineering and astronomy- so an early understanding will set them up for a more successful learning sequence for all their science subjects, and support their mastery of mathematics as well. We also have extension programs that cover Biology, Physics and Astronomy to an equal depth. About Ian Stuart (Email: [email protected]): The founder of Atomic School, Ian Stuart, taught Chemistry and Physics for 25 years at senior levels before he realized that his 8-year old son, Tom, could understand Atomic Theory at a much deeper level than he expected. After visiting Tom's class at school, he discovered that his peers could also grasp the abstract scientific concepts, as well as apply it usefully to the real world. Ian then developed a program to teach the advanced concepts of high school Chemistry, Physics and Biology to students 10 years younger than they normally would. He found that this engaged their interest in modern science early, and sustained it through to high school and beyond. It also sets them up for future success in their academic and career paths. Ian has a Bachelor's Degree in Chemistry from the University of Queensland and a Master's degree in Electrochemistry from the University of Melbourne. Connect with Atomic School on social media: http://facebook.com/AtomicSchool http://twitter.com/AtomicSchools http://instagram.com/AtomicSchools Video transcript:
Views: 148700 AtomicSchool
Chemical Bonds: Covalent vs. Ionic
 
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Mr. Andersen shows you how to determine if a bond is nonpolar covalent, polar covalent, or ionc. Intro Music Atribution Title: I4dsong_loop_main.wav Artist: CosmicD Link to sound: http://www.freesound.org/people/CosmicD/sounds/72556/ Creative Commons Atribution License
Views: 628690 Bozeman Science
Covalent vs. Ionic bonds
 
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This quick video explains: 1) How to determine the number of protons, neutrons, and electrons that an atom will comtain. 2) The characteristics of covalent bonds 3) The characteristics of ionic bonds Teachers: You can purchase this PowerPoint from my online store for only $3. The link below will take you to the store. https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Covalent-vs-Ionic-Bonds-PowerPoint-2340207 - Atom - Element - Proton - Neutron - Electron - Atomic number - Atomic mass - Covalent - Ionic - O2 - Salt - Sodium chloride
Views: 407554 Beverly Biology
Ionic vs. Molecular
 
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To see all my Chemistry videos, check out http://socratic.org/chemistry How can you tell the difference between compounds that are ionic and molecular (also known as covalent)? It has to do with the elements that make them up: ionic compounds are made of metals and nonmetals, and molecular (or covalent) compounds are made of nonmetals. We'll learn how they bond differently: in covalent compounds, the atoms share electrons, and in ion compounds, atoms steal electrons and then opposite charges attract. Ionic and molecular (covalent) compounds also look different at the microscopic level: covalent and molecular compounds exist in molecules, while ionic compounds are organized in lattice structures.
Views: 732636 Tyler DeWitt