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VC and Private Equity | Equity Funding – Fund Your Business | Dun & Bradstreet
 
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Venture capital and private equity funding both offer money in exchange for a percentage of ownership in your business. However, there are a few fundamental differences between the two. In this video we explain how each form of funding works and the types of companies they lend to. You’ll also hear from real people who work with both types of funding on a daily basis. Find more information on the different types of funding available for your business at: www.education.dandb.com Connect with us! Twitter: http://twitter.com/DandB/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dandbcredibility/
Views: 41447 Dun & Bradstreet - B2B
What is private equity? - MoneyWeek Investment Tutorials
 
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Firms seeking new capital will often turn to private equity to get it. Tim Bennett explains why, and also why the industry has taken such a battering in recent years.
Views: 215146 MoneyWeek
Startup Funding Explained: Everything You Need to Know
 
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Views: 1446574 The Rest Of Us
Hedge funds, venture capital, and private equity | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Similarities in compensation structure for hedge funds, venture capital firms, and private equity investors. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/investment-vehicles-tutorial/hedge-funds/v/hedge-fund-strategies-long-short-1?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/investment-vehicles-tutorial/hedge-funds/v/are-hedge-funds-bad?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Hedge funds have absolutely nothing to do with shrubbery. Their name comes from the fact that early hedge funds (and some current ones) tried to "hedge" their exposure to the market (so they could, in theory, do well in an "up" or "down" market as long as they were good at picking the good companies). Today, hedge funds represent a huge class investment funds. They are far less regulated than, say, mutual funds. In exchange for this, they aren't allowed to market or take investments from "unsophisticated" investors. Some use their flexibility to mitigate risk, other use it to amplify it. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 144041 Khan Academy
The Difference between Private Equity and Venture Capital
 
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Rick Smith is the Co-founder of Crosscut Ventures (http://crosscutventures.com/) Private equity is a safer investment and venture capital looks for greater returns. FOR MORE EXPERT CONTENT VISIT: http://www.docstoc.com/resources/videos Docstoc is the largest online collection of business and legal documents to help you grow and manage your small business and professional life. http://www.docstoc.com/video/89632722/private-equity-vs-venture-capital
Views: 47799 docstocTV
Equity vs. debt | Stocks and bonds | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Debt vs. Equity. Market Capitalization, Asset Value, and Enterprise Value. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/venture-capital-and-capital-markets/v/chapter-7-bankruptcy-liquidation?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/venture-capital-and-capital-markets/v/more-on-ipos?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: This is an old set of videos, but if you put up with Sal's messy handwriting (it has since improved) and spotty sound, there is a lot to be learned here. In particular, this tutorial walks through starting, financing and taking public a company (and even talks about what happens if it has trouble paying its debts). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 371201 Khan Academy
Investopedia Video: Private Equity Fundamentals
 
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Private equity refers to company ownership by a specialized investment firm. Typically, a private equity firm will establish a fund and use it to buy multiple businesses, with the goal of selling each one within a few years at a profit. Private equity firms will often target an underperforming business and, after purchasing the company, use their management expertise to improve profitability.
Views: 127369 Investopedia
Funding for Your StartUp | Private Equity | Venture Capital | Angel Investor | Dr Vivek Bindra
 
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In this Video Dr Vivek Bindra unveils the secret on how to attract fundings for a startup business. He discusses in detail the difference between Private equity investors and venture capitalists. He also advises new business and start ups different ways to attract funds. Watch this video until the end for successful growth and health of your business 1. If you want to know how to raise funds for your startups from external agencies then watch this video 2. If you want to know how to raise funds for your startups through venture capitalists then watch this video 3.If you want to know how to raise funds through PE investors then watch this video 4.If you want to know more about angel investors then watch this video 5.If you want to know more about seed capital then watch this video 6. If you want to know more about debt capital then watch this video 7.If you want to know more about seed fundings then watch this video 8. If you want to know more about IPO then watch this video 9. If you want to know more about growth capital then watch this video 10. If you want to know more about debt restructuring then watch this video 11. If you want to know more about debt financing then watch this video 12. If you are looking for investors then watch this video 13.If you are looking for venture capital then watch this video 14.If you are looking for PE investors then watch this video To Attend a 4 hour Power Packed “Extreme Motivation & Peak Performance” Seminar of BOUNCE BACK SERIES, Call at +919310144443 or Visit https://bouncebackseries.com/ To attend upcoming LEADERSHIP FUNNEL PROGRAM, Call at +919810544443 or Visit https://vivekbindra.com/upcoming-programs/leadership-funnel-by-vivek-bindra.php Watch the Leadership funnel Program Testimonial Video, here at https://youtu.be/xNUysc5b0uI Follow our Official Facebook Page at https://facebook.com/DailyMotivationByVivekBindra/ and get updates of recent happenings, events, seminars, blog articles and daily motivation.
Equity vs Debt - Hindi
 
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What is Equity? What is Debt Investment & Fund Raising meaning? When you invest in an Asset or Business, you have mainly two choices to raise funds - Equity and Debt. Similarly, you can also invest in Equity Investment products such as Equity Shares, Mutual Funds, ULIP, ELSS, Private Equity, Venture Capital etc. or you can invest in Debt Instruments such as Loans, Corporate Bonds, Government and Infrastructure Bonds, Debt Mutual Funds & ULIPs etc. Related Videos: NPV (Net Present Value): https://youtu.be/SpHIBfPGwx8 IRR (Internal Rate of Return): https://youtu.be/x6eXfx2Tv-w Discount Rate: https://youtu.be/XqqD1d713W8 इक्विटी इन्वेस्टमेंट और फंडरेज़िंग क्या होता है? डेब्ट इन्वेस्टमेंट और फंडरेज़िंग का अर्थ क्या है? जब आप किसी संपत्ति या व्यापार में निवेश करते हैं, तो आपके पास फंड्स रेज़ करने के लिए मुख्य रूप से दो विकल्प होते हैं - इक्विटी और डेब्ट। इसी तरह, आप इक्विटी शेयर, म्यूचुअल फंड, यूएलआईपी, ईएलएसएस, प्राइवेट इक्विटी, वेंचर कैपिटल इत्यादि जैसे इक्विटी निवेश प्रोडक्ट्स में भी निवेश कर सकते हैं या आप लोन, कॉर्पोरेट बॉन्ड, गवर्नमेंट एंड इंफ्रास्ट्रक्चर बॉन्ड, डेब्ट म्यूचुअल फंड और यूएलआईपी आदि जैसे डेब्ट इंस्ट्रूमेंट्स में इन्वेस्ट कर सकते हैं। Share this Video: https://youtu.be/5CWrpR6mcFw Subscribe To Our Channel and Get More Property and Real Estate Tips: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCsNxHPbaCWL1tKw2hxGQD6g If you want to become an Expert Real Estate investor, please visit our website https://assetyogi.com now and Subscribe to our newsletter. In this video, we have explained: What is the meaning of equity investment and fundraising? What is debt investment & fundraising? What is the definition of equity? What is debt? How funds are raised using equity or debt for asset or business? What are some common equity investment product? How does equity fundraising work? What is the concept of equity fundraising? What is the basic concept of equity and debt? How is the concept of equity and debt used in business? What is the difference between equity fundraising and debt fundraising? What options are there for equity or stock investments? Make sure to Like and Share this video. Other Great Resources AssetYogi – http://assetyogi.com/ Follow Us: Google Plus – https://plus.google.com/+assetyogi-ay Twitter - http://twitter.com/assetyogi Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/assetyogi Linkedin - http://www.linkedin.com/company/asset-yogi Pinterest - http://pinterest.com/assetyogi/ Instagram - http://instagram.com/assetyogi Hope you liked this video in Hindi on “Equity & Debt - Investment & Fundraising”.
Views: 77333 Asset Yogi
What is equity?
 
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Video explanation as to how equity is created in a small business and start up up. What is equity, is a video ebook chapter from igoIQ.com and is perfect for any entrepreneur wanting an explanation of equity in business
Views: 460040 FounderMachine
12 Difference between Venture Capital VC and Private Equity PE
 
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1. Private equity firms mostly buy mature companies that are already established. Venture capital firms mostly invest in start-ups with high growth potential. 2. Primary Lever: Private Equity: Optimized Structure Venture Capital: Disruptive Innovation 3. Venture capitalists focus on sourcing, identifying, and investing in what they believe are entrepreneurs and startups that will succeed and bring large returns later down the line. 4. Private equity firms do control investing, where they acquire a majority stake or 100% of companies, while VCs only acquire minority stakes. 5. Private equity firms have a mix of equity and debt in their investment; whereas, the venture capitalists only make equity investments. 6. Private equity firms can buy companies from any industry, while venture capital firms are limited to start-ups in technology, biotechnology and clean technology.  7. Primary Investment Trigger: Private Equity: Underutilized Assets Venture Capital: Team 8. Investment Size: Private Equity: Large Investments From 100 million to 10s of billions. Venture Capital: $50000 to 5 million 9. VCs expect that most of their portfolio companies will fail, but that if one company becomes the next Facebook, they can still earn great returns.  10. Economic Philosophy Private Equity: Neoclassical Venture Capital: Economics Innovation Ecosystems  11.  Private equity tends to attract former investment bankers, while venture capital gets a more diverse mix: Product managers, business development professionals, consultants, bankers, and former entrepreneurs. 12. Direction of Value Creation Private Equity: Top-down Venture Capital: Bottom-up
Views: 1167 Patel Vidhu
Private Equity VS Venture Capital
 
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Вебинар: Private Equity VS Venture Capital Спикер: Василий Вельдяксов, Менеджер по инвестициям, BVCP Основные вопросы на вебинаре: - основные отличия PE от VC - тренды индустрий - основные игроки в РФ и на западе - чем занимаются сотрудники данных областей - что нужно знать, чтобы попасть на работу в PE и VC Приятного просмотра! Special Offer с экономией 40% 👉🏻 http://bit.ly/2D5Vqe0
Views: 558 SF Education
Debt vs. Equity Analysis: How to Advise Companies on Financing
 
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In this tutorial, you'll learn how to analyze Debt vs. Equity financing options for a company, evaluate the credit stats and ratios in different operational cases, and make a recommendation based on both qualitative and quantitative factors. http://breakingintowallstreet.com/ "Financial Modeling Training And Career Resources For Aspiring Investment Bankers" Table of Contents: 0:50 The Short, Simple Answer 3:54 The Longer Answer – Central Japan Railway Example 12:31 Recap and Summary If you have an upcoming case study where you have to analyze a company's financial statements and recommend Debt or Equity, how should you do it? SHORT ANSWER: All else being equal, companies want the cheapest possible financing. Since Debt is almost always cheaper than Equity, Debt is almost always the answer. Debt is cheaper than Equity because interest paid on Debt is tax-deductible, and lenders' expected returns are lower than those of equity investors (shareholders). The risk and potential returns of Debt are both lower. But there are also constraints and limitations on Debt – the company might not be able to exceed a certain Debt / EBITDA, or it might have to keep its EBITDA / Interest above a certain level. So, you have to test these constraints first and see how much Debt a company can raise, or if it has to use Equity or a mix of Debt and Equity. The Step-by-Step Process Step 1: Create different operational scenarios for the company – these can be simple, such as lower revenue growth and margins in the Downside case. Step 2: "Stress test" the company and see if it can meet the required credit stats, ratios, and other requirements in the Downside cases. Step 3: If not, try alternative Debt structures (e.g., no principal repayments but higher interest rates) and see if they work. Step 4: If not, consider using Equity for some or all of the company's financing needs. Real-Life Example – Central Japan Railway The company needs to raise ¥1.6 trillion ($16 billion USD) of capital to finance a new railroad line. Option #1: Additional Equity funding (would represent 43% of its current Market Cap). Option #2: Term Loans with 10-year maturities, 5% amortization, ~4% interest, 50% cash flow sweep, and maintenance covenants. Option #3: Subordinated Notes with 10-year maturities, no amortization, ~8% interest rates, no early repayments, and only a Debt Service Coverage Ratio (DSCR) covenant. We start by evaluating the Term Loans since they're the cheapest form of financing. Even in the Base Case, it would be almost impossible for the company to comply with the minimum DSCR covenant, and it looks far worse in the Downside cases Next, we try the Subordinated Notes instead – the lack of principal repayment will make it easier for the company to comply with the DSCR. The DSCR numbers are better, but there are still issues in the Downside and Extreme Downside cases. So, we decide to try some amount of Equity as well. We start with 25% or 50% Equity, which we can simulate by setting the EBITDA multiple for Debt to 1.5x or 1.0x instead. The DSCR compliance is much better in these scenarios, but we still run into problems in Year 4. Overall, though, 50% Subordinated Notes / 50% Equity is better if we strongly believe in the Extreme Downside case; 75% / 25% is better if the normal Downside case is more plausible. Qualitative factors also support our conclusions. For example, the company has extremely high EBITDA margins, low revenue growth, and stable cash flows due to its near-monopoly in the center of Japan, so it's an ideal candidate for Debt. Also, there's limited downside risk in the next 5-10 years; population decline in Japan is more of a concern over the next several decades. RESOURCES: https://youtube-breakingintowallstreet-com.s3.amazonaws.com/Debt-vs-Equity-Analysis-Slides.pdf
Cost of Capital and Cost of Equity | Business Finance
 
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http://goo.gl/qQjWG8 for more free video tutorials covering Business Finance. This video explains two important concepts of business finance- cost of capital & cost of equity. First part of the video discusses on cost of capital drawing an example of a firm in terms of debt and equity. The cost of capital primarily depends upon the use of funds not the source. Next, the video briefly discusses on cost of equity referring the returns that investors holding shares in a firm require subsequent to an explanation on SML approach and dividend growth model. Moving on the video also asks to calculate the cost of equity for an example of extremely prices shares. Step by step calculation has shown and ways to find out some important parameters are demonstrated visibly. Good understanding on cost of capital; cost of equity & there in between relationship as well as having knowledge on different methods of calculation is imperative to become an expert on today’s business finance and accountancy.
Views: 140137 Spoon Feed Me
What's in a Growth Equity Case Study?
 
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In this growth equity lesson, you'll learn how to set up 3-statement projection models for growth equity case studies. By http://breakingintowallstreet.com/ "Financial Modeling Training And Career Resources For Aspiring Investment Bankers" You will also learn how to calculate the potential IRR and money-on-money multiple at the end, and how to make an investment decision based on the output of the model. For all the Excel files, PDFs, written explanations, etc., please see: http://www.mergersandinquisitions.com/growth-equity-case-study/ Please see the link above to get all the Excel files, the PDFs, and the full written explanation along with the answer key. Table of Contents: 5:49 Model Assumptions 7:20 Revenue Assumptions 9:51 Expense Assumptions 11:22 CapEx, D&A, and BS/CFS Projections 13:25 Financial Statements 17:15 Returns Calculations 21:58 Conclusions
Convertible Notes, Equity and Startup Funding Explained
 
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If you're starting your first company, understanding stock, preferred stock, options, convertible notes and other fundraising instruments can be truly overwhelming. We didn't find a single video that covered this, so here we go. If you are an early-stage startup company in the tech space, the best way to raise capital is with a convertible note or a similar instrument. However, to understand how those work, we first need to understand how stock works. STOCK You are probably familiar with the term 'stock.' A company is divided into chunks, and each shareholder owns a certain percentage of the company, which gives control of company decisions, and a share of the profits. A PRICED ROUND: RAISING MONEY FOR STOCK The 'traditional' approach towards raising capital is with a priced round. Tech companies are different. Tech companies have tremendous scale potential and often fantastic margins. A software product or an app, for example, can realistically operate with 80%+ margins, and serve millions of customers around the world, with a minimal staff. Think of Uber, who raised $500,000 on their first round, and are now worth, well, billions of dollars. So the value of a startup is not related directly to their revenue, but to their potential. Some variables to take into account here are: - The market size, how many customers are there in the world. - The technology variable, is there a unique piece of tech that nobody else has, or that optimizes a process drastically? - Potential margins, how many employees are needed to serve 100,000 customers or 1,000,000 customers? When Instagram had 300 million users, their staff was 13 people. However, all these numbers are variables and theories, and nobody knows for sure. The valuation of a startup is defined by how much potential an investor sees in the business, how risky it is, and how much upside do they want in exchange for risking their money, just like a bet. These days, a reasonable number for a tech company like our theoretical FounderHub would be a $4,000,000 (pre-money) valuation. Again, assuming this is a high scale, high margin business. All of these decisions require negotiations, and lawyers, and signatures to be put in writing, and they can make the process take six months or more from 'agreeing to invest.' Since most early companies don't have six months, they often choose to go with a Convertible Note. If you want to run your own calculations, you can download the free template we have at FounderHub.io?utm_source=youtube.com&utm_medium=video&utm_campaign=video-content&utm_term=fundraising CONVERTIBLE NOTES A convertible note is an instrument that delays the valuation conversation, and it allows the company to access the capital sooner, with less negotiation and much smaller legal fees. A convertible note is like a loan, but instead of using an asset like a house for collateral, the company stock is the collateral. This means, obviously, that the investor also needs to believe in the business to invest, because the note intends to convert into stock. Like I said before, defining a company valuation is tough. Too many variables, too little data... so with a convertible note, the investor is saying: I'll give you the money for you to grow now. In a year or so we should have the data to support a priced, traditional round, so my investment will convert then, with the valuation and terms that the new investors define. So a convertible note is an investment that triggers, - Ideally, on a new round of funding. - Also ideally, if the company is acquired. - At a predefined deadline, often 18 or 24 months after the original investment. At this point, investors can negotiate a note extension, they can convert it at the Cap, or they can request a payback, again, if the company can afford it. Now, YCombinator and 500 Startups have both designed documents inspired by convertible notes, but simpler. And free. The KISS-A (Keep it simple security) and the SAFE (simple agreement for future equity) are simplified convertible note templates that you can use to raise money and skip lawyer fees. You can download it on our FounderHub site, and refer to our knowledge base for more details on completing it. They both work as a convertible note but reducing a lot of the paperwork requirements. Alright. We have videos coming on the process of incorporating a business, distributing founder stock and vesting. Let us know which of those topics you would like us to prioritize. If you found this useful, help us out by subscribing and sharing. ► Subscribe to our Channel Here http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=slidebean -- About Us: Slidebean is a pitch deck creation tool with hundreds of templates available to use as a starting point. Thousands of companies have used our platform to pitch investors and raise capital. ---- Follow Us: Twitter: https://twitter.com/slidebean Linkedin: http://www.linkedin.com/company/slidebean
Billionaire Henry Kravis: The Future of Private Equity Investing
 
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A interview and Q&A with billionaire and Co-CEO of private equity giant KKR, Henry Kravis. In this interview Henry talks about how private equity has changed and where he predicts it will go. Henry also talks about the rise of growth equity investing in private equity and unicorn companies. 📚 Books on Henry Kravis and KKR are located at the bottom of the description❗ Like if you enjoyed Subscribe for more:http://bit.ly/InvestorsArchive Follow us on twitter:http://bit.ly/TwitterIA Other great Private Equity investor videos:⬇ Steve Schwarzman reflects on Blackstone and His Life:http://bit.ly/SSPEPic Billionaire Henry Kravis on Finance, Work Ethic and Life: http://bit.ly/HKFVid Billionaire Leon Black: Investment Strategy for Private Equity:http://bit.ly/LBlackVid Video Segments: 0:00 Introduction 0:21 Donald Trump said you would be a good treasury secretary 0:45 When you are looking at a deal, how do you look out for disruption in that industry? 4:32 Is a IPO of First Data on the horizon? 5:13 Why are you entering the growth equity/Venture capital market? 8:00 Do you think the deals are in a bubble? 9:22 Would you buy a index of unicorn companies? 10:32 Is a growth equity fund coming? 12:15 Paying the tech peoples salary? 12:50 Did you learn anything new when KKR went public? 15:24 Are the concerns of tech CEOs about going public legitimate fears? 16:25 How much of a technologist are you? 17:16 Investing with Iconiq 18:29 How do you get a feel of good culture at a company? 23:43 In the next 12 months will we see a $10 billion buyout? 24:22 Start of Q&A 24:37 Over the past 25 years, what have you had to give up to be more successful in investing? Henry Kravis and KKR Books 🇺🇸📈 (affiliate link) The New Financial Capitalists:http://bit.ly/NewFinancialCapitalists Merchants of Debt:http://bit.ly/MerchantsofDebt Barbarians At The Gate:http://bit.ly/BarbariansGate The Money Machine:http://bit.ly/MoneyMachineKKR Interview Date: 21st July, 2015 Event: Fortune's Brainstorm Tech Original Image Source:http://bit.ly/HKravisPic1 Investors Archive has videos of all the Investing/Business/Economic/Finance masters. Learn from their wisdom for free in one place. For more check out the channel. Remember to subscribe, share, comment and like! No advertising.
Views: 25975 Investors Archive
Venture Capital and Private Equity - moderated by William A. Sahlman
 
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Jane Brock-Wilson (MBA 1983), Managing Director, Berkshire Partners Jane Mendillo, President and CEO, Harvard Management Company Camille Samuels (MBA 1998), Affiliated Director, Versant Ventures Lisa Skeete Tatum (MBA 1998),` Independent Investor and Board Member
What's the difference between investment banking and private equity?
 
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Sherjan Husainie, of Leaders Global Network, offers career workshops in ten major cities around the world. He has worked in both investment banking at Morgan Stanley and in private equity at Google Capital. For more info, visit http://www.leadersgn.com/
Views: 236366 Career Insider Business
Accounting for Investments (Equity and Debt Securities)
 
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This video provides an overview of the accounting rules and classifications for different types of investments. Investments can be broadly grouped into two types: debt investments and equity investments. Debt investments can be held-to-maturity (presented on the Balance Sheet at amortized cost, with changes in fair value not affecting Net Income), available-for-sale (presented on the Balance Sheet at fair value, with unrealized gains or losses bypassing the Income Statement and flowing through Other Comprehensive Income), or Trading (presented on the Balance Sheet at fair value, with unrealized gains or losses affecting Net Income. Equity investments are treated as Trading Securities according to the Fair Value Method (if the investor owns less than 20% of the investee), which marks the investment to market on the Balance Sheet and has unrealized gains or losses flow through Net Income. There is a practicability exception, however: if the fair value cannot be determined, the investment is presented on the Balance Sheet at cost, minus any impairments. If the investor owns between 20% and 50% of the investee the Equity Method is used; with this method, the investor does not recognize dividend revenue but instead recognizes a proportionate share of the investee's Net Income. If the investor owns more than 50% of the investee, the investor must consolidate the investee (the two entities are treated as one consolidated entity). Edspira is your source for business and financial education. To view the entire video library for free, visit http://www.Edspira.com To like Edspira on Facebook, visit https://www.facebook.com/Edspira To sign up for the newsletter, visit http://Edspira.com/register-for-newsletter Edspira is the creation of Michael McLaughlin, who went from teenage homelessness to a PhD. The goal of Michael's life is to increase access to education so all people can achieve their dreams. To learn more about Michael's story, visit http://www.MichaelMcLaughlin.com To follow Michael on Twitter, visit https://twitter.com/Prof_McLaughlin To follow Michael on Facebook, visit https://www.facebook.com/Prof.Michael.McLaughlin
Views: 24867 Edspira
Accessing Capital in Small Communities: Equity Capital
 
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Presentations begin at the 5:00 minute mark We’ve all heard terms like “venture capital” and “angel investors”, but how much do you really know about the world of equity investments and how they power business growth? This webinar will explore the life cycle of businesses and when businesses need different kinds of equity. We’ll discuss the realities of accessing equity capital in a small community, and look in detail at programs that help businesses attract investors, including the Small Business Venture Capital Tax Credit. Ministry of Jobs, Trade and Technology Speakers: - David Baleshta and David Wallace, Investment Capital Branch - Ian Wong, BC Immigrant Investment Fund - Susan Low, Regional Programs and Engagement Branch For more information or to register for upcoming webinars visit: http://gov.bc.ca/economicdevelopment and look under BC Ideas Exchange.
Views: 37 ProvinceofBC
What is return on equity? - MoneyWeek Investment Tutorials
 
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Like this MoneyWeek Video? Want to find out more on equity returns? Go to: http://www.moneyweekvideos.com/what-is-return-on-equity/ now and you'll get free bonus material on this topic, plus a whole host of other videos. Search our whole archive of useful MoneyWeek Videos, including: · The six numbers every investor should know... http://www.moneyweekvideos.com/six-numbers-every-investor-should-know/ · What is GDP? http://www.moneyweekvideos.com/what-is-gdp/ · Why does Starbucks pay so little tax? http://www.moneyweekvideos.com/why-does-starbucks-pay-so-little-tax/ · How capital gains tax works... http://www.moneyweekvideos.com/how-capital-gains-tax-works/ · What is money laundering? http://www.moneyweekvideos.com/what-is-money-laundering/
Views: 115604 MoneyWeek
29. What is Return On Equity - Warren Buffett's Favorite Number
 
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Download Preston's 1 page checklist for finding great stock picks: http://buffettsbooks.com/checklist Preston Pysh is the #1 selling Amazon author of two books on Warren Buffett. The books can be found at the following location: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0982967624/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=0982967624&linkCode=as2&tag=pypull-20&linkId=EOHYVY7DPUCW3WD4 http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1939370159/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=1939370159&linkCode=as2&tag=pypull-20&linkId=XRE5CA2QJ3I2OWSW In this lesson, we learned the importance of buying a company that has a strong return on equity. Since the market price of the stocks you buy is dependent on the dividends and the growth of the book value, we can quickly learn that a company that grows it's book value at a faster pace is more valuable. When we assessed two different companies in the video, we created a situation where both companies had the exact same earnings. The difference between the companies was the size of their equity (or book value). When a company with a large amount of book value is compared to a company with less book value, the percent change in their growth will be much more difficult if earnings are similar. When a company consistently has a strong Return on Equity, we know as investors that the management of the company is properly reinvesting the earnings of the business into assets that will continue to grow the capital earned. This is very important since most of the earnings produced by a company are retained and not paid as a dividend. When a disciplined investor purchases companies with a sustained high ROE, their investments compound at a much higher rate than other assets. The great thing with purchasing companies with high ROEs is that it helps alleviate capital gains tax if the security is held for a long period of time.
Views: 135895 Preston Pysh
Return on Investement and Return on Equity (ROI / ROE) - Ratio Analysis
 
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Explained the concept of Return on Capital Employed / Return on Investment (ROI) and Return on Equity (ROE). Student can also watch following lectures for better understanding of the topic: 1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=76gMXQBnbps 2. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1iYK6s5_Db0 3. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hMoOk6iI564 4. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H7Etrk0xfAs Download Assignments https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0BzfDYffb228JNW9WdVJyQlQ2eHc?usp=sharing #Accounting #RatioAnalysis
Views: 60358 CA. Naresh Aggarwal
QuickBooks - how to record capital equity contributed by partners
 
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How do I record start up capital? My partner and I each made an initial equity investment into our business. Visit our website: http://NewQuickBooks.com Subscribe our YouTube Channels: http://youtube.com/VPController/ http://youtube.com/NewQBO/ Like us on Facebook: http://facebook.com/QuickBooksQBO/
Views: 9966 VPcontroller
6. How do Private Equity Firms find deals?
 
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How do private equity firms find deals? The question should be: “How do private equity firms find good deals”. I run a private equity firm, and I get calls all the time from investment bankers and brokers, saying, “Steve, we have the perfect deal for you!” and they try to convince me (on the phone) that this deal is just for me. But, I know that the second they hang up the phone with me, they’re calling Bill, they’re calling Jeff, and they’re calling Susan with the exact same deal. These are not good deals; these are just……deals. Private equity firms need to find good deals through proprietary deal flow. Proprietary deal flow is obtained (for the most part) through connections. Private equity firms need to get to know lawyers and accountants who could know when their clients are about to sell, allowing them to tell the firms in advance. Private equity firms need to make a lot of connections in an industry, so that when the executives/owners of those companies want to sell, they tell the private equity firm before they market the deal to other companies. Private equity firms should also make connections with other private equity firms. If a private equity firm has a deal, and it doesn’t have the capital to do the entire deal themselves, the firm might call on another private equity firm to be part of a syndicate. To get deals you need to get out there - get out of that office. Finally, you need to market your private equity firm really well. If you market effectively,entrepreneurs will know to come to you. In summary, if you’re a private equity firm, you need to find good deals. Stop taking calls from those bankers, stop taking calls from those brokers, get out of your office and get proprietary deal flow. In 2014, the yogurt company Chobani needed $750 million. Before the market found out, Chobani was already in talks with TPG. Why? The co-founder of TPG, David Bonderman, knew a prominent businessman in Turkey, Cuneyd Zapsu, who in turn knew the CEO of Chobani, Hamdi Ulukaya. Remember, proprietary deal flow is all about working the connections you have. After all, this $750 million deal happened because a guy knew a guy who knew a guy.
Views: 19759 Steve Balaban
Financial Market #1: Investment Funds [ETF, ReITs, InvITs], Debt, Equity, & Derivatives
 
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- since last three years, UPSC has asked barely 1-2 MCQs from the Finance, capital market and share market topics, therefore, we will only try to gather a working knowledge about these topics rather than pursuing technical accuracy or academic excellence. - There are two ways to start a company: debt and equity. - Debt instruments are further classified in 1) short-term instruments such as T-bills, Cash Management Bills (CMBs), Commercial papers, Promissory Notes, Certificate of Deposits - and Commercial Bill and 2) long-term instruments such as Loan, external commercial borrowing (ECB), Dated securities (G-Sec), Bonds (UK), Debentures (US), Municipal Bonds and Inflation Indexed Bonds - what is credit rating? Why does economic survey say that foreign credit rating agencies are having double standards for Indian sovereign bonds? - What is Bond Yield to maturity (YTM)? How is it related with RBI’s monetary policy and economic growth? - What was the impact of Donald Trump’s election and demonetisation on the yields of Indian government’s bonds. - What a coupon bonds, zero-coupon bonds, bearer bonds. Why is Fiat currency called “zero interest anonymous bearer bond? - Types of equity finance: Shares, preferential shares, venture capital funds and angel investors. What is seed capital and sweet equity? - Taxability on share dividend and bond interest? - Share: Face value, At par value, premium value, initial public offer (IPO), follow-on public offer, public issue, private issue, rights issue, preferential shares; Share buyback, share splitting, retained earnings - ADR- American depository receipts, global depository receipts (GDR), Bharat depository receipts (BhDR) - Types of mutual fund: net asset value (NAV), exit load. - Hedge funds and alternate investment funds. - Exchange Traded Funds (ETF), InvITs: infrastructure investment trusts, REITs: Real estate investment trusts, salient features and benefits. - Derivatives, securitisation, forward market, future market, spot market. Call option and Put Option. - SWAP agreements: Credit Default Swap, Currency Swap, Interest swap - Faculty Name: You know who - All Powerpoint available at http://mrunal.org/powerpoint - Exam-Utility: UPSC IAS IPS Civil service exam, Prelims, CSAT, Mains, Staff selection SSC-CGL, IBPS-PO/MT, IBPS-CWE, SBI PO & Clerk, RBI and other banking exams; LIC, EPFO, FCI & other PSU exams; CDS, CAPF and other defense services exams; GPSC, MPPCS, RPSC & other State PCS services exams with Indian Economy, Budget, Banking, Public Finance in its syllabus- with descriptive questions and answer writing.
Views: 184477 Mrunal Patel
Venture Capital and Private Equity Investments
 
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When the entrepreneur sells a share of the company in exchange for financial support.
Private Equity Explained
 
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Private equity and venture capital is finance provided in return for an equity stake in potentially high growth companies. It is behind some of the UK’s best known and most innovative businesses such as Alliance Boots, Centre Parcs, Odeon & UCI Cinemas and Spotify. Watch this video to find out more about the industry Find us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/BVCA
Views: 24436 BVCA
Why VCs and Angel Investors Say "No" to entrepreneurs | Alicia Syrett | TEDxFultonStreet
 
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Early-stage investors often receive more than 100 pitches per month, which means they need to say "no" to over 99%. Alicia Syrett, CEO of Pantegrion Capital, frequent on-air personality on MSNBC and CNBC, shares the most common blunders that get startups rejected. Founder/CEO of Pantegrion Capital and The Point 25 Initiative. CNBC Power Pitch and MSNBC Your Business Regular. Contributor for Inc. Instructor at Columbia University. Board of the NY Tech Alliance. Ms. Syrett was named as one of the “25 Angel Investors in New York You Need to Know” by AlleyWatch, one of Wharton’s “40 Under 40” young alumni by Wharton Magazine, and one of Virgin’s “Five Next Generation Leaders Emerging from Tech.” She has been featured in Forbes, TechCrunch, Inc., The Huffington Post, Mashable, Entrepreneur, NPR’s Marketplace, and USA Today. She has also appeared on CNBC’s Make Me a Millionaire Inventor and Cash Crowd, Nightly Business Report (NBR) on PBS, and Fox Business’s Risk & Reward. She founded The Point 25 Initiative and also wrote a Guide for Entrepreneurs for #MentHERnyc, an event she co-founded. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx
Views: 71187 TEDx Talks
HKSI Career Day 2012 - Equity Capital Markets in an Investment Bank (Philippe Espinasse)
 
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In this annual career talk, former banker Philippe Espinasse come and share his career path in investment banking with our members and new entrants to the industry. Click this link (http://goo.gl/04VZw) for his presentation. *** Mr Espinasse is former Co-Head of Equity Capital Markets (ECM), Asia at Nomura; former Managing Director & Head of ECM, Asia at Macquarie; and former Executive Director & Head of Equity Corporate Finance, Asia at UBS / S.G. Warburg. He is a member of the HKSI. He worked in Asia for over 12 years, and as a senior investment banker in the US, UK/Europe and Asia, in various capital markets roles for over 19 years. Throughout his career, he has successfully completed more than 140 corporate finance transactions, including many billion-dollar privatisation and private sector IPOs, equity and equity-linked fund raisings, real estate investment trusts, infrastructure funds, principal and pre-IPO investments, M&A and advisory transactions, euro- and domestic bond issues and debt private placements. He is the author of "IPO: A Global Guide" (Hong Kong University Press, April 2011). He has also appeared on Bloomberg Television, on CNBC, on FT.com, on Reuters Television, on BBC World News Television, on Australia Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) radio, and on Hong Kong's RTHK radio. *** Click this link (http://goo.gl/xlmw3) for more advice.
Views: 4419 HKSI Institute
Private Equity: Startup & Early Stage Capital
 
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Sara Hand delivers a brilliant introduction to private equity, including the language of early stage investing, how entrepreneurs should deal with seed and angel investors, courting investors in the new economy, and her favorite stories of recent deals made. http://www.s-m-arts.com
Views: 9252 Jim Aardema
Billionaire Stephen Schwarzman on Private Equity, His Life and Blackstone
 
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Billionaire Stephen Schwarzman interviewed by David Rubenstien. In this interview Stephen discusses early life and how certain opportunities made him what he is today. Stephen also discusses the creation of his firm Blackstone, and how he grew it to become the third largest private equity firm in the world(2016).📚 Books on Stephen Schwarzman and Stephen Schwarzman’s favourite books are located at the bottom of the description❗ Like if you enjoyed Subscribe for more:http://bit.ly/InvestorsArchive Follow us on twitter:http://bit.ly/TwitterIA Video Segments: 0:00 Introduction 2:44 Growing up /Fathers business 5:00 Yale 7:05 Lehman Brothers 13:08 Why did you leave Lehman Brothers/ Starting Blackstone 20:06 Trying to raise a fund 22:07 Expanding out of private equity 29:01 Deals you are most proud of and one that got away 37:15 Going public 43:29 Valuation for private equity firms lower than regular asset management firms 45:49 What do you want to do with your wealth? 51:07 Are you going to stay at Blackstone? Stephen Schwarzman Books 🇺🇸📈 (affiliate link) King Of Capital: http://bit.ly/KingofCapital Stephen Schwarzman’s Favourite Books🔥 The Prince:http://bit.ly/ThePrinceSS We Were Soldiers Once… and Young:http://bit.ly/WeWereSoldiersOnce The Interpretation of Dreams: http://bit.ly/InterpretationOfDreamsSS Childhood and Society: http://bit.ly/ChildhoodandSociety The Prize: The Epic Quest for Oil, Money & Power: http://bit.ly/ThePrizeSS Interview Date: September 15th, 2015 Event:The Economics Club Of Washington, D.C Location: Mandarin Oriental Washington, DC Hotel, Grand Ballroom Original Image Source: http://bit.ly/SchwarzmanPic Investors Archive has videos of all the Investing/Business/Economic/Finance masters. Learn from their wisdom for free in one place. For more check out the channel. Remember to subscribe, share, comment and like! No advertising.
Views: 46971 Investors Archive
Billionaire Leon Black: Investment Strategy for Private Equity
 
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An interview with billionaire Co-Founder of Private Equity giant Apollo Global Management, Leon Black. In this interview Leon covers four topics in depth: Apollo over 25 years, The firms investment strategy, Deals and Passions outside of finance. This interview offers a rounded view of Leon Black and Apollo Management Group. Like if you enjoyed Subscribe for more:http://bit.ly/InvestorsArchive Follow us on twitter:http://bit.ly/TwitterIA Video Segments: 0:00 Introduction 0:21The firm's growth over 25 years? 5:13 Investment approach and differences to other firms 14:54 What deals have you learnt the most from? 21:46 Passions outside of work Interview Date: 5th December, 2015 Event: Prime Quadrant Conference 2015 Original Image Source:http://bit.ly/LeonBlackPic Investors Archive has videos of all the Investing/Business/Economic/Finance masters. Learn from their wisdom for free in one place. For more check out the channel. Remember to subscribe, share, comment and like! No advertising.
Views: 20874 Investors Archive
A look at Private Equity Investments in the Indian Market
 
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Financial Opportunities Forum (February 2018): Mr. Rajeev Thakkar, takes a look at how Private Equity businesses have shaped the business & investment climate in the Indian context. Private Equity investors have been involved in the Indian capital markets for a while now. They not only affect operational performance at many of their invested companies but also affect the market valuations by providing growth capital at the right time for businesses to scale. Presentation can be downloaded here: https://amc.ppfas.com/pdf-docs/fof/a-look-at-private-equity-investments-in-the-indian-market.pdf Disclaimer: Viewers should assume that PPFAS's Clients, PPFAS, its Directors, Employees have investments in the stocks and Mutual funds which are spoken about (long investment positions). We do not short stocks or indices. We do not speculate in Futures and Options.
Views: 6641 PPFAS Mutual Fund
Seed Funding for Startups: How to raise venture capital as an entrepreneur
 
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Raising money is hard. It's so hard most companies fail at it. In this video, we'll look into traction requirements, pitch decks, alternative funding sources and on how to find investors. This is seed funding for entrepreneurs. I'm the CEO of a company called Slidebean, and thousands of startups have used our platform to create their pitch decks. Their success is our success, and this is why we get involved with them and have learned a thing or to about what works, and what doesn't. I started my first company in 2011, and I failed at raising capital. I know the pain of shutting down a website you spent countless hours on, and having to email all your customers to say it's game over. The problem with my first company is that we spent too much time trying to find investors, hence we failed to notice some of the fundamental flaws in our product. For Slidebean, we raised a seed round of $800,000 which has allowed us to grow to a team of 25, increase our revenue to seven digits and become profitable in the process. And yeah, it was hard. I'm telling you this because I want you to trust my advice. I tried and failed, and I can look back and see why I got a 'NO' from most of the 142 investors I pitched. Yeah, 142 to raise $800,000. So let's talk about traction, first. I have this problem with startup press (but we love YOU, @jordanrcrook). It gives new founders a false notion of how fundraising works. You read the story of Yo, an app that just sent notifications saying 'Yo' and how they raised a $1,000,000 seed round, and you assume that's something anyone with a couple of lines of code can do. Most companies raise money AFTER getting traction. Very few companies raise money with just a prototype and no users, and certainly, NO company raises money without a fully formed founding team. The most extreme case here is tech companies that are trying to raise money to hire a CTO. This makes no sense. Tech talent is expensive, and it's scarce, and the first proof that your company is worth something is that you managed to find a full stack developer that would turn down a job at Google to work on this idea. As a CEO, you need to be able to find and convince that guy, who joins your company for the stock and not for the salary; when he could be making $150,000/yr otherwise. The reality of startup fundraising today, at least in Silicon Valley and New York, is that companies are pitching investors with traction, excellent traction. Traction usually comes in the form of revenue: tens of thousands of dollars per month, growing over +20% month-over-month. I'm not making this up, check this article by VC Elizabeth Yin. Pure play, no-revenue traction counts only when you are dealing with millions of users and fantastic retention rates. So how can you get to these numbers venture capitalists expect, if you don't have any money to start with? Yeah well, bootstrapping. We bought our domain in 2013 and started working on our product, but it was only after 18 months that we managed to get any decent money to ramp up growth. It was $100,000 from the 500 Startups program, but we'll talk about accelerators in a minute. From May 2013 through October 2014 we bootstrapped. We did part-time consulting so we could pay our bills. We had a $1,000 salary each, and we shared an apartment. It was barely enough, but the backgrounds of the three founders made up for all the talent we needed: no need to hire anyone. Our company burn rate was probably $3,500 including our 'salaries' and the services we needed. It sucked; but if you can live on a budget and put up with your co-founders while having no idea what's going to happen, you've passed a very tough test. -- Links we referred to: Check out this one for more info on how to get into an accelerator: https://slidebean.com/blog/startups/accelerator-application-500-startups?utm_source=youtube.com&utm_medium=video&utm_campaign=video-content&utm_term=seed-funding Download our Pitch Deck template: https://slidebean.com/business-presentation-templates/?utm_source=youtube.com&utm_medium=video&utm_campaign=video-content&utm_term=seed-funding To Download our Managing Investors spreadsheet template sign up to FounderHub here: https://founderhub.io/?utm_source=youtube.com&utm_medium=video&utm_campaign=video-content&utm_term=seed-funding Elizabeth Yin Article: https://elizabethyin.com/2018/10/18/should-you-raise-money-or-bootstrap/ ► Subscribe to our Channel Here http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=slidebean -- About Us: Slidebean is a pitch deck creation tool with hundreds of templates available to use as a starting point. Thousands of companies have used our platform to pitch investors and raise capital. ---- Follow Us: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/slidebean Twitter: https://twitter.com/slidebean Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/slidebean Linkedin: http://www.linkedin.com/company/slidebean
10. Review: Private Equity, Direct Investing, Fund Investing, Co-investing and Secondary Investing
 
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Review: Private Equity, Direct Investing, Fund Investing, Co-investing and Secondary Investing Investors can invest in private equity in four different ways: Directly, funds, co-investments and secondaries. Direct investing is when an investor directly invests in private companies. It could be buying the entire company or a minority investment. Fund investing is when an investor goes to a private equity fund and the private equity fund buys companies on the investor’s behalf. Co-investing is the most complicated option. For example, an investor invests $50 million in a private equity fund with co-investment rights, meaning that when the fund looks for opportunities it can allow the investor to participate not only through the fund, but directly as well. An example of this would be when a fund is looking at investment in a $40 million company. That investment needs $30 million equity and $10 million in debt. The equity portion given by the fund (without co-investing) would be $30 million dollars. In the case of co-investing, the fund gives $20 million (in which the investor is participating through the fund) with the remaining $10 million (i.e. The difference between the $20 million in equity given by the fund and the $30 million equity needed) is offered to the investor to do on a direct basis resulting in the fund investing $20 million and the investor investing $10 million. When investors invest into a fund, they pay full fees, typically paying a 2% management fee and a 20% performance fee (i.e. “two and twenty”). By investing $10 million directly, other than a small deal origination fee, investors are able to reduce their overall fees. (For more on fees see Video #4). The fourth way to invest in private equity is through secondaries. In this example our investor makes a commitment to invest $50 million in a private equity fund by giving about $10 to $20 million dollars to the private equity fund up front for the first two fund investments. As more acquisitions are made, the private equity fund makes capital calls to the investor. The investor is usually locked into the private equity fund for seven to ten years (or longer). If the investor wants out of this agreement, the commitment can be sold to other investors. The sale can be of the entire commitment (which would include the existing deals that the private equity fund was already made, plus future capital calls) or it can be done through a structured secondary (selling different parts) where the investor may want to keep the existing investments and just sell the future commitments. As easy as an investor can sell a secondary, it can buy one as well.
Views: 8374 Steve Balaban
3. Who Invests in Private Equity
 
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Who invests in private equity? Investors in private equity are institutions and individuals. Institutions are defined as pension funds, endowments, and foundations. Currently (2016) individuals are comprised of family offices and select high net worth individuals. In the future, more and more people are going to be investing in private equity. In August 2015, Private Equity International compiled a list of the biggest investors in private equity. The list includes four categories of investors which include direct investors, fund investors, as well as investors that invest in co-investments and secondary investments. Direct investing is when an investor directly invests in private companies. It could be buying the entire company or a minority investment. Fund investing is when an investor goes to a private equity fund and the private equity fund buys companies on the investor’s behalf. Co-investing is the most complicated option. For instance, an investor invests $50 million in a private equity fund with co-investment rights, meaning that when the fund looks for opportunities it can allow the investor to participate not only through the fund, but directly as well. An example of this would be when a fund is looking at investment in a $40 million company. That investment needs $30 million equity and $10 million in debt. The equity portion given by the fund (without co-investing) would be $30 million dollars. In the case of co-investing, the fund gives $20 million (in which the investor is participating through the fund) with the remaining $10 million (i.e. the difference between the $20 million in equity given by the fund and the $30 million equity needed) is offered to the investor to do on a direct basis resulting in the fund investing $20 million and the investor investing $10 million. When investors invest into a fund, they pay full “two and twenty” fees (i.e. typically paying a 2% management fee and a 20% performance fee). By investing $10 million directly, other than a small deal origination fee, investors are able to reduce their overall fees. (For more on fees see the following video). The fourth way to invest in private equity is through secondaries. In this example, our investor makes a commitment to invest $50 million in a private equity fund by giving about $10 to $20 million dollars to the private equity fund up front for the first two fund investments. As more acquisitions are made, the private equity fund makes capital calls to the investor. The investor is usually locked into the private equity fund for seven to ten years (or longer). If the investor wants out of this agreement, the commitment can be sold to other investors. The sale can be of the entire commitment (which would include the existing deals that the private equity fund was already made, plus future capital calls) or it can be done through a structured secondary (selling different parts) where the investor may want to keep the existing investments and just sell the future commitments. As easy as an investor can sell a secondary, it can buy one as well. Returning to the August 2015 list of all the types of investments in private equity compiled by Private Equity International, we see that the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board (CPPIB) tops the list. CPPIB participates in all types of investments including direct, fund investments, co-investments, and secondaries. One of its most notable investments was in Skype. Skype was purchased from eBay in 2009 and sold to Microsoft in 2011. CPPIB had a small portion of that deals. In 2009, CPPIB invested $300 million and in 2011 it received $933 million. Yes, that’s right; CPPIB put in $300 million and received $933 million back in two years. Not too bad! To recap: Investors in private equity are institutions including pensions like CPPIB, endowments, foundations, and individuals. In 2016, individuals are mostly family offices and select high net worth individuals. In the future, more and more people are going to have access to private equity.
Views: 12816 Steve Balaban
What is the difference between debt vs equity funding?
 
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Debt vs Equity funding for Property projects and what is IRR? http://estatebaron.com.au A bank these days can lend upto 80% of the total cost of the project (land + permits + construction + sales). This means in order to make a project possible a developer only needs to come up with 20% of the money required themselves, with the rest being borrowed. A good project needs to deliver atleast 20% profit on the total money invested in the project. However out of the total money invested only 20% is equity and the rest is being borrowed. Lets say we have a 12 month project which cost $100 and generated a profit of $20. Out of the $100 investment only $20 was equity by the developer and the rest $80 was lent by bank at 5%. So out of the $20 profit, $4 goes to the bank as interest on its $80 at 5%. And the remaining $16 goes to the developer for his $20 investment. This is an 80% return on equity in one year. Not bad at all! If the project was two year long then the yearly equity return would be 40%. For a 4 year project this would be 20%. The annual return on equity is also called Internal Rate of Return or IRR. Find out more at http://estatebaron.com.au today!
Views: 20256 Estate Baron
Career pathways in private equity & venture capital
 
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As a trade body, the BVCA is committed to raising awareness of the private equity and venture capital industry. We want to do more to encourage more people to join and stay in the industry and this involves working with private equity and venture capital firms, universities and business schools.
Views: 1478 BVCA
Difference between Debt and Equity
 
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join my Whatsapp Broadcast / Group to receive daily lectures on similar topics through this Whatsapp direct link https://wa.me/917736022001 by simply messaging YOUTUBE LECTURES If you wish to learn more about above topic ,check this Online course Financial Management A Complete Study for CA/CMA/CS/CFA/ACCA and here is the: Enrollment Link For Students Outside India: https://bit.ly/2D2QE0I Enrollment Link For Students From India: https://bit.ly/2WwImFW Check our other Comprehensive courses in Finance /Accounts / Costing / Credit Analysis / Financial Management / Statistics / Banking / Auditing, etc. @ lowest ever price in the market: I) ACCOUNTING COURSES: a) Accounting Basics A Complete Study https://bit.ly/2Wy4ZtE b) Advanced Accounting A Complete Study https://bit.ly/2FHR1zs c ) Accounting Standards A Complete Study https://bit.ly/2FKuuSM d) Consolidated Financial Statement https://bit.ly/2TCijuY e) Company Valuation https://bit.ly/2CMtqff f) MBA Accounting and Finance for Managers https://bit.ly/2uAczrG g) Accounting for CA Inter Paper 1 (Module 1) https://bit.ly/2EH2Czx h) Accounting for Employees Stock Ownership Plan (with Co-Instructor Anu Sebastian) https://bit.ly/2CIHDtE i) How to prepare Financial Statements for Indian Companies (with Co-Instructor Anu Sebastian) https://bit.ly/2FAdTjq II) BANKING COURSES: a) Accounting and Finance for Bankers https://bit.ly/2YxfGyk b) Accounting, Finance and Banking A Complete Study https://bit.ly/2FKcd89 c) Banking PO Exams Practice Test Series Part 1 (with Co-Instructor Sandeep Kumar) https://bit.ly/2HPyWBY d) NPA Management - A Complete Study https://bit.ly/2OfpZCl III) COSTING COURSES: a) Cost Accounting A Complete Study https://bit.ly/2YwSRe1 b) Management Accounting A Complete Study https://bit.ly/2CHTrMT IV) CREDIT ANALYSIS COURSES: a) Banking Credit Analysis Process (for Bankers) https://bit.ly/2TbmAoO b) How to Carry out Term Loan Appraisal & Assessment as Banker https://bit.ly/2Uedjhh c) How to Carry out Financial Analysis as Banker https://bit.ly/2FHTdaa d) Credit Policy, Products Delivery, Appraisal, Risk & Rating https://bit.ly/2DxhsqR e) Export Finance, Priority Sector Lending and Retail Loan https://bit.ly/2RVWjzj V) DIRECT TAXATION COURSES: a) Direct Taxation in India https://bit.ly/2JMPYSZ VI) FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT COURSES: a) Financial Management A Complete Study https://bit.ly/2WwImFW b) Advanced Financial Management A Complete Study https://bit.ly/2Yw8n9U c) Financial Management for CA Inter Exams https://bit.ly/2U4CerB d) CFA Corporate Finance Level 1 https://bit.ly/2TI61RU e) CFA Corporate Finance Level 2 https://bit.ly/2FFnnKh VII) GST COURSES: a) Basics of GST in India https://bit.ly/2uHn2BL VIII) AUDITING COURSES: a) Basics of Auditing https://bit.ly/2Y5dVYO IX) TAMIL COURSES ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT COURSES: a) Accounting Basics in Tamil https://bit.ly/2TIWqhG b) Financial Management in Tamil https://bit.ly/2HioBOD X) STATISTICS COURSES: a) Basics of Statistics https://bit.ly/2FIB8Jc XI) For Competitive Exam: a) Reasoning ability for IBPS PO Mains Exams https://bit.ly/2GLvqaA b) Master Squares and Cubes: Excel in Competitive Examination (with Co-Instructor Sandeep Kumar) https://bit.ly/2YyG7U5 c) Simplification Techniques and Tricks for Competitive Examinations (with Co-Instructor Sandeep Kumar) https://bit.ly/2MrQIe9 d) General Awareness for IBPS-PO Mains Exam(with Co-Instructor Sandeep Kumar) https://bit.ly/2V4cZ4O e) General knowledge for IBPS- PO mains Exam(with Co-Instructor Sandeep Kumar) https://bit.ly/2SPtftO XII) MARKETING: a) Learn Advertising through Real Life Cases https://bit.ly/2FyKbLw b) Basics of AD-Message & Product Classification https://bit.ly/2FHTolU XIII) BUSINESS : a) Basics of Economics a Complete Study https://bit.ly/2TD9LnH b) Basics of Forex Management A Complete Study https://bit.ly/2IT1Vq2 c) Basics of Commerce A Complete Study https://bit.ly/2UlJn60 d) Basics of Indian Companies Act 2013 https://bit.ly/2FyGXHW XIIII) BASICS OF BUSINESS : a) Finance for Non Finance Executives https://bit.ly/2CLem1A Install our android app CARAJACLASSES to view lectures direct in your mobile - https://bit.ly/2S1oPM6
Views: 117964 CARAJACLASSES
Six things every investor should know about return on capital employed (ROCE)
 
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Return on capital employed (ROCE) is a key ratio that can reveal lots of useful information about a firm. In this short guide, Tim Bennett explains how it works, when it is most useful and when it can let you down.
Views: 39986 MoneyWeek
Most Easy Explanation of Share Market for Beginners Malayalam |Finance, Investment & Money Education
 
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This video is the easiest explanation of Introduction to Stock Market/Share Market in Malayalam in Kerala. In this video, I explain what shares, going public, IPO (Initial Public Offering) etc are and I also explain how the prices of shares fluctuate with time. This video contains fundamentals of stock market or share market. This video is for beginners who are learning about stock market or share market and planning to invest in stock market or share market. This video does explain how to invest in stock market or share market; I will upload that video soon. #sharemarket #stockmarket #investment #malayalam Please like, share, support and subscribe at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC9CKy1ai9qI8p6_Oh0Qa3Rg :) Instagram - sharique.samsudheen WhatsApp - +91-7907124314 Like and follow on Facebook at www.facebook.com/sharqsamsu
Views: 155819 Sharique Samsudheen
Private Equity Compensation [2018 Summary]
 
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Private Equity Compensation 2018 Report Summary from: https://privateequitycompensation.com/ Private equity, venture capital and hybrid firms face new challenges even as they strive to overcome existing headwinds. These new challenges include carried interest, data management, environment and social governance (ESG) and pre-existing issues such as transparency, fund structure, fund raising and market conditions, just to name a few. However important these issues may be for the future of the private equity and venture capital industry, the goal of this report is to quantify, to the extent possible, how industry trends affect compensation in the industry. This is the fourth straight year of gains in the private equity compensation and only 6 percent of this year’s respondents have reported an expectation of lower earnings this year. We have observed a number of potential trends in this year’s private equity compensation report, one of which is increasing base salaries and declining bonuses as a percentage of overall compensation for private equity and venture capital professionals in the highest pay band. The correlation between private equity bonus pay and firm performance continues to diminish. Through 2013, our report had routinely confirmed the principle that exceptional performance was rewarded with a grand bonus. In 2015, we saw this principle tested; in 2016, we saw it proved erroneous, and in 2017, it became apparent that the absence of correlation is the new normal. In this 2018 report, we see that respondents employed in firms whose performance is down by 1 to 9 percent still forecast an average bonus of $161,000. In last year’s private equity compensation report, we identified movement in a positive direction with respect to the quality of training our respondents receive in-house. Unfortunately, we have seen that revert back in this year’s report. Our annual review of MBA base and bonus compensation, as well as vacation time, shows a return to more favorable treatment in both base and, to a lesser extent, bonus pay for respondents with an advanced degree. For private equity job seekers, this report reveals which positions are in demand, what percentage of firms are hiring, and what percentage are cutting back. For example, 25 percent of respondents’ firms are hiring accounting personnel, but just 11 percent are hiring investor relations staff. In short, the 2018 Private Equity Compensation Report confirms a few commonly held truths and eliminates the occasional misconception. Its graphs, charts, and the corresponding analysis serve to provide readers insightful, industry-specific information regarding the complex subject of venture capital compensation as well. Other highlights from this year's report include: • Small-sized firms saw the largest increases in base pay; • Fund raising has become the number one job security concern among survey respondents; • PE Small-Cap continues to be the most favored investment strategy; • Private equity and venture capital professionals working in the largest firms continue to out-earn peers in smaller firms; and • The share of personal carry, as a percentage, increases in direct proportion to the individual’s level of investment decision input and work experience. Download the full report at https://privateequitycompensation.com/
Views: 1178 Job Search Digest
Types of Shares - Equity and Preference
 
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In this video I have explained about terms : Types of share Equity Share Preference Share Difference between Equity and preference shares ---------------------------------------------- Open an online trading and Demat account with Zerodha - https://zerodha.com/open-account?c=ZMPNYN ---------------------------------------------- Here are some recommended books for Share market education with corresponding links: Hindi books: Kaise market Mein Nivaise Kare - http://amzn.to/2fgFEkf Intraday Trading Ki Pehchan - http://amzn.to/2fGJmUO English Books: The Intelligent Investor - http://amzn.to/2xZ8cdw How to Make Money Trading with Candlestick Charts - http://amzn.to/2y0vBLi ---------------------------------------------- Share, Support, Subscribe!!! Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/BasicGyaan.F Twitter: https://twitter.com/BasicGyaan Instagram Myself :https://www.instagram.com/SunilSolves/... Google Plus: https://plus.google.com/1010703809019... Microphone i use : http://amzn.to/2xBYjBO About : BASIC GYAAN is a YouTube Channel, where you will find Videos on curious interesting topics related to Finance, Economics and Trending topics in Hindi, New Video is Posted Every week :)
Views: 438770 Basic Gyaan
Negotiating Startup Equity Splits (Valuing Sweat vs. Capital)
 
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http://cenkuslaw.com If you need money for your startup should you give up a huge part of your startup equity to get it? It's human nature overvalue the things we want but don't have, and undervalue the things we once wanted so badly but now obtain. Nowhere have I seen this more apparent than when a startup founder needs money and is willing to give up a huge amount of equity to get it. This poses a gigantic problem for a number of reasons, the most prominent being that giving up upwards of 50% of your business early on disincentivizes you to continue working as hard on your project. Additionally, you eliminate the possibility of future rounds of capital investment. So, if you have a startup and need money, how do you avoid these problems? Great question! Take a look and leave a comment or contact me with any questions. _________________________________________________________________ This is the tenth video in my Business Partnership Mastery Series, where I dive into both the philosophy and legal nuts and bolts of mastering business partnerships. If you are a current or future business owner, you will definitely want to stay tuned for videos in this upcoming series, so make sure to subscribe! Inspired by the content in my book, Partner-Proofing Your Partnership, I will touch and expand on the primary concepts I fleshed out in that short read which you can find here: http://www.businessattorneyinaustin.com/brett-cenkus-partner-proofing-your-partnership-ebook _________________________________________________________________ For a deeper dive into and other legal issues vital to the success of your deals and your business, visit me at: www.cenkuslaw.com Just starting up? Check this out for my advice on startup success: www.thestartupshepherd.com. You can also reach me at: https://www.linkedin.com/in/brettcenkus https://twitter.com/BCenkus http://www.cenkuslaw.com http://www.cenkus.com _________________________________________________________________ About me: My 20+ years of experience in business finance, business law and entrepreneurship have led me to believe that numbers and logic are awesome tools, but understanding human nature and emotions is the first step to business success. The Cenkus Law Firm provides services related to mergers & acquisitions, general business issues and startups, including founders’ agreements and fundraising. I also consult with entrepreneurs and have invested my own capital as an angel investor. From 2010-2013 I served as Chief Legal Counsel of a publicly-traded international oilfield services company. From 2001 to 2006 me and a partner founded and built Paragon Residential Mortgage. Paragon was sold to Bridge Investments in 2006. I hold a Juris Doctorate from Harvard Law School and a Bachelor of Arts degree in Economics from Messiah College in Grantham, Pennsylvania. Now, I live in Austin, TX with my wife and two kids. I enjoy reading, running, classic movies, great food and wine and some great American football.
Views: 1455 Brett Cenkus
Venture Capital Perspectives:  Early Stage Biotech Investing with Doug Cole, Flagship Ventures
 
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Presenting a panel discussion with Marian Nakada (Johnson & Johnson Innovation – JJDC), Bob Silverman (Roche) and Steven Weinstein (Novartis Ventures), moderated by CTV’s executive director Orin Herskowitz. The conversation touches on the various ways Big Pharma & Biotech are using venture capital investing, regional innovation centers, joint ventures, university research sponsorship, and IP licensing to source their next blockbuster products (as well as generate equity returns). The panelists share their perspectives on venture capital investing strategies in biopharma, how to pitch strategic investors, the surge in biotech IPOs, hot research areas within biopharma, and best practices for establishing R&D partnerships between industry and academia. Doug Cole, MD is a managing partner at Flagship Ventures. He has previously served as Program Executive at Vertex Pharmaceuticals, Inc., in Cambridge, MA and as Medical Director at Cytotherapeutics, in Providence, RI. Prior to his work at Cytotherapeutics, Doug served as Instructor in Neurology at Harvard Medical School and an Assistant in Neurology at the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, MA. At Flagship, Doug has led investments in Agios Pharmaceuticals (NASDAQ: AGIO), Alvine Pharmaceuticals, Avedro, CombinatoRx, Concert Pharmaceuticals (NASDAQ: CNCE), Denali Therapeutics, Editas, Quanterix Corporation, Receptos (NASDAQ: RCPT; acquired by Celgene, Inc.), Seventh Sense Biosystems, Tetraphase Pharmaceuticals (NASDAQ: TTPH), and Torque Therapeutics. He is a co-founder of Flagship portfolio companies Ensemble Therapeutics, Permeon Biologics, Moderna Therapeutics, and Syros Pharmaceuticals. Orin Herskowitz, VP of Intellectual Property and Tech Transfer for Columbia University and Executive Director of Columbia Technology Ventures (CTV), is also an Adjunct Professor at Columbia’s Business and Engineering Schools. He has been a Board Member or Advisor to a number of innovation and entrepreneurship-focused initiatives in NYC, including the NYC Media Lab, the Coulter Translational Partnership, and PowerBridgeNY.
VentureFounders| Equity Investment Platform | Why our investors choose us
 
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If you would like to know more why not go to: https://www.venturefounders.co.uk VentureFounders is a UK-based equity investment platform designed to make angel and venture capital-style investing more accessible, affordable and transparent. We believe that this market should be open to all who can afford it, as long as they understand the risks associated with early-stage investment. As an investor through VentureFounders, you can invest from a minimum of £1,000 in some of the UK’s fastest-growing and most exciting companies. VentureFounders offer a meticulous, informed, fair and far-sighted investment platform that stands out from the crowd. In this video VentureFounders Investor Andrew McMurdo gives his opinion on why he thinks VenutreFounders is his platform of choice when it comes to investing: “What differentiates VentureFounders is that they look at slightly later stage investments past proof of concept, which gives me greater confidence when investing. You also have the opportunity of investing alongside professional investors as regularly they will co-invest alongside Angels and Venture Capitalists” For more information on our current live investment opportunities go to https://www.venturefounders.co.uk/opportunities Or for more information on us: https://www.venturefounders.co.uk/about
Views: 60 Venture Founders
2 . What is Private Equity?
 
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What’s Private Equity? Private equity includes investing in a private company and investing in a public company, and bringing that public company private. An example of this was the management buyout where Michael Dell combined with the private equity company, Silver Lake Partners, to buy Dell off the stock market for $24.9 billion. Technically, by definition, venture capital would be a subset of private equity, but, here in North America, we look at private equity and venture capital as two distinct things. Of course, at the University of Waterloo we have a course titled Private Equity and Venture Capital. Private equity represents Buyouts investments in larger, more mature companies that use significant amount of debt Venture Capital investments in smaller companies, younger companies that use little or no debt. “In between” buyouts and venture capital is growth capital. Growth capital are minority investments that are usually made in more mature companies. You can classify growth capital more as private equity, but it could also be classified as venture capital. For example, Georgian Partners invest minority stakes in growing companies that have revenues between $10 and $80 million (Georgian Partners is referred to as a late-stage venture capital firm). So we looked at buyouts, growth capital, and venture capital, now let’s look at a detailed example of buyouts. Let’s say we buy a business for $40 million that has $5 million in EBITDA. Let’s say that the bank will give us a loan for four times EBITDA. So 4 times $5 million: that’s a $20 million loan. Now, let’s assume an interest rate of 5% per year. 5% of $20 million is $1 million a year. Let’s look at the difference between doing this deal without leverage or with leverage. Without leverage: We’re paying $40 million for $5 million in EBITDA, That’s a 12.5% return. With Leverage: We’re only paying $20 million (because the bank is paying the other $20 million). We’re not getting $5 million (because we still have to pay that $1 million in interest), so we’re getting $4 million. $4 million on your $20 million is a 20% return. By adding leverage to this deal we’re increasing the return from 12.5% to 20%. That’s a simple example of how a leveraged buyout works.
Views: 13793 Steve Balaban
Private Equity (Heuschrecken) einfach erklärt /Venture Capital/Growth Capital/LBO
 
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Vielen Dank für das Anschauen des Videos! Unser Wikifolio: https://www.wikifolio.com/de/de/w/wfsmallliq Liked gern das Video und abonniert unseren Kanal! In diesem Video erklären wir euch, was Private Equity ist. Wir gehen also auf die Bereiche des Private Equity ein, also Venture Capital, Growth Capital und Leveraged Buyouts (LBO's). Also eine kurze Erklärung zu Private Equity.
Views: 5237 easyfinance