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Hazard Analysis & Critical Control Points (HACCP)_Fulton County
 
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FultonCountyInfo's shared video file.
Views: 106141 FultonCountyGovernment
HACCP training with example (orange juice 🍹🍹🍊🍊) in very simple way part one
 
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#haccp #foodsafety #foodhygiene #simplyfoodea #Risk #riskassessment #riskmanagement #foodsafetytraining #assessment #haccp_plan #hazard #foodhazard #food_safety #educational_channel Part Two : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l5RfFUhm-9I Hazard ☠️Vs Risk and ❗Risk Assessment📝✏️🥤🍊 Part Three : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vrgmTJ0PU9A Orange Juice 🍊🍷Raw Materials & Packaging Material🥤🍼 Risk Assessment Part Four : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WVMWM3koQJg Allergens 🥚🥛and Non Allergens🍖🥩🐄Risk Assessment Hello every body on simplyfoodea channel Today we will explain the first 5 steps of HACCP Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points The HACCP system was first introduced in the 1960s in NASA to ensure food safety for astronauts. Application of the HACCP system in addition to the Prerequisite Programs and the Good Manufacturing Practices (GMPs) provides the best protection for food. The application of the HACCP system ensures that the company controls all the hazards that may affect food, whether these hazard are physical, chemical or biological. Orange Juice HACCP plan The 12 Steps To Develop a HACCP Plan are divided to 5 Primary Steps and 7 Basic Principles. The 5 Primary Steps are : 1- Assemble the HACCP Team. 2- Describe the Product ( components and storage condition ). 3- The Intended Use and Consumers. 4- Draw a Flow Diagram to Describe the Process steps. 5- On-Site Confirmation of Flow Diagram. 1. Assemble the HACCP Team from different departments (Top Management + Quality and Food Safety + Production + Sales + Maintenance + Purchasing). 2- Describe the Product ( components and storage condition ) (Natural Pasteurized Orange Juice) and its components (Orange + Water) specifications (Sugar Free) and methods of preservation (stored in the refrigerator in temperature from 4 - 8 ⁰) calorie/ml . 3 - The Intended Use and Consumers (Drink directly from the bottle / user category age from two years and not recommended for patients with pressure) Validity / Expire period of 14 days. Orange Juice flow diagram steps 1- Receiving of Orange 2- Sorting of Orange 3- Washing 4- Squeeze-out 5- Filtering 6- Concentration 7- Reconstitution 8- Pasteurization 9- Bottles Filling 10- Bottles capping 11- X Ray 12- Dating the bottles 13- Packing the bottles 14- Arranging on Pallets 15- Storing 16- Distribution The 7 principles of HACCP (must memorize in order) 1 - Conduct a Hazard Analysis 2 - Identify the Critical Control Points 3 - Establish Critical Limits 4 - Monitor CCPs 5 - Establish Corrective Action 6 - Verification 7 – Recordkeeping / Documentation Step 2 Product descriptions – End products must be characterized by type and description in order to facilitate hazard analysis. Information must include: - 1. Product categorization 2. Composition 3. Biological, chemical, and physical characteristics 4. Shelf life and storage conditions 5. Packaging 6. Labelling related to food safety – including handling, preparation and usage instructions 7. Method of distribution Step 3 Intended Use - 1- The end intended use of the products must be described in a manner that defines: - 1. Who will consume the products? 2. How is the end product to be consumed? 3. If the end product is mishandled, what is the food safety risk? Step 4 - Process Flow Diagram Construction - 1- The flow diagram is a schematic overview of the operation/production process. They may be formed by site, line, product or area - but must cover all food operations covered within the HACCP Scope, have sufficient detail to allow for effective hazard analysis, and show clear cross referencing between diagrams where required. 2- Flow diagram content must include the following, where relevant: - • The sequence and interaction of all process steps • Raw materials, utilities, and food contact material introduction points • Potential for process delay • Rework and recycling points • Outsourced processes and sub-contracted work • Any high/low risk area segregation • All product forms - finished, intermediate/semi-processed, by-products, downgraded forms and waste • CCP’s and their overview Step 5 - Process Flow Diagram Verification - 1- Diagrams as developed above must be verified by physically following the process (walk the line) during production to confirm accuracy and completeness. 2- This must be completed by, as a minimum, representatives from the QA, Manufacturing and Engineering functions in the HACCP team 3- This verification must be documented and reconfirmed annually, or when a process is changed. Food Safety Training food safety training video تدريب سلامة الغذاء تدريب سلامة الأغذية
Views: 20760 Simplyfoodea
HACCP: The Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point System
 
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HACCP: The Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point System - Department of Agriculture 1996 - - Provided by the Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) of USDA. Reproduced with permission of the Minister of Public Works and Government Services, Canada.
Views: 127255 PublicResourceOrg
How to Conduct a Hazard Analysis: HACCP Principle #1
 
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Five steps of Hazard Analysis. After studying this video, you should be able to justify the importance of a complete and accurate hazard analysis and conduct a hazard analysis on a food product and its process and document the results.
Views: 21473 Clinton Stevenson
Hazard analysis critical control (HACCP)
 
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Subject : Food and Nutrition Paper: Food Safety and Quality Control
Views: 3035 Vidya-mitra
HACCP Food Safety Hazards
 
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A video for food processors identifying food safety hazards as outlined by HACCP standards HACCP Compliance Brochure - http://info.madgetech.com/haccp-compliance-for-meat-processors Check out our website - http://www.madgetech.com/ "On My Way" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
Views: 34135 MadgeTech, Inc.
HACCP in Hindi  all information in one video(every chef must know)
 
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Learn 15 COOKING METHOD https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4TQamoQpIUY&t=236s FOLLOW ME ON FACEBOOK-https://m.facebook.com/biswajit.bain.77398 __________________________________________ FOLLOW ME ON INSTAGRAM- https://www.instagram.com/accounts/edit/ ____________________________________ _____ CONNECT WITH ME ON WHATSAPP- 9820730918 HACCP Learn food cookimg temperature https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dl-QggThbXk&t=103s IN this video I have discussed all about HACCP .. 1.What is HACCP? 2.HACCP full form. 3.when it started ? 4.which company started ? 5.How HACCP works ? 6.HACCP 7 principles. So watch this video till the end to get all the information for your better knowledge. VISIT MY WEBSITE http://bain90.xyz/blog.php to watch my all video and others I formation. Bain90
Views: 27763 Bain90
Was ist HACCP - Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points?
 
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Was bedeutet eigentlich HACCP und was ist ein HACCP Konzept? Sicher haben Sie den Begriff HACCP, die Kurzform von Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points, schon einmal gehört. Aber was ist HACCP wirklich? Ins Deutsche übersetzt ist HACCP die Gefahrenanalyse kritische Lenkungspunkte. Mit diesen Tipps der VOREST AG werfen wir einen genaueren Blick darauf, was hinter dem Begriff HACCP steckt und klären die Frage, zu was ein HACCP System eigentlich dient. Mit mehr Wissen zu Ihrem Erfolg - weitere Infos unter www.vorest-ag.com
HACCP - Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points
 
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http://food-safety-training.net Physical contamination is something, usually, that is physically noticed in the food product, such as hair, string, metal, stones, plastic, etc. This is generally more of a nuisance factor unless the contaminant is a food safety hazard such as glass shards. But even a hair in food is classed as contamination and is illegal. Chemical contamination is the introduction or presence of chemicals in food, which can give rise to more chronic effects on health. (Chronic = long term effects, Acute = short term effects). So cleaning chemicals, petrol fumes, aftershave/perfume, arsenic from pest control chemicals, agricultural residues, pesticides, an excess of additives/preservatives, etc. are all classed as chemical contaminants. Allergenic contamination is the presence or introduction of a substance that could invoke an allergic reaction from a consumer. The main allergens are referred to as “The Big 8”: Peanuts Tree Nuts Milk Protein Fish Shellfish Wheat Soya Eggs People can also be affected by seeds such as sesame or celery, fruit and vegetables and alcohol (especially the contents of alcoholic drinks such as sulphites or yeast). A severe allergic reaction to food can give rise to an anaphylactic shock (anaphylaxis), which is life threatening. Anaphylaxis is the body’s way of overcompensating for what it believes is the ingestion of “poison” The body is very adept in fighting infection, either from outside the body or within. Inside our body, for example, we have sensors covering the membranes of our mouth, throat and oesophagus. These sensors (Chemo-receptors to give them their correct name) monitor all food and drink that enter the mouth and oesophagus on its journey to the stomach and eventual digestion. If the sensors pick up signals of what is perceived to be a poison, i.e. something that could harm the human body, they send messages to the brain, which instigates an attack on the “poison”. Scientists have not worked out why this happens with allergens, as they are not poisonous, but the sensors mistakenly send signals to the brain to act accordingly. The attack mode the brain uses is to instruct cells from the immune system (white blood cells) to release histamine to attack the “perceived poison”. However, during anaphylaxis, the brain overcompensates and instructs too many of the cells to release the histamine. This results in symptoms of a rash, swelling of the throat and oesophagus and subsequent blocking of the trachea, causing respiratory failure, collapse and death. People who are subject to such attacks are prescribed an Epi-pen, which contains adrenalin. (Epi stands for Epinephrine, which is the American term for Adrenalin) When this is injected into the person’s thigh will cause the symptoms to subside. What are the steps in setting up a HACCP system? The Codex Alimentarius Commission has provided a 12-point system for setting this Food Safety Management System into operation: Bring together and provide training for the HACCP team and define the terms of reference. Provide a full description of the product, recipe and process. Identification of end user. Construction of flow diagram. Walk the Talk by confirming the flow diagram. Identification of hazards, risks, severity and control measures. Determination of the critical control points. Establishment of critical limits and target levels for each control point. Provision of a monitoring procedure for each critical control point. Corrective action to be undertaken when a critical control point is moving out of control. Introduce verification Establishment of documentation and what records require maintaining. The HACCP course is very straightforward to understand, although there are far too many definitions and phrases to remember, especially when the underlying principle of this system is to prevent contamination entering the Food Safety Chain. http://food-safety-training.net
Views: 1956 Dave Summers
Part 4. HACCP Principle 2:   Identifying Critical Control Points
 
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Applying the 2nd HACCP principle to your food safety plan in order to identify critical control points (CCPs) in your process.
Views: 1787 NRSBC
Determining Critical Control Points: HACCP Principle 2
 
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After studying this lesson, you should be able accomplish the following learning outcomes: - Describe the requirements for CCPs - Apply a decision tree towards identifying CCPs - Document findings on the HACCP Plan Summary form
Views: 10318 Clinton Stevenson
HACCP - Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points
 
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http://food-safety-training.net So what is HACCP? Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points (HACCP) is a Food Safety Management System that was developed in the early 1960s for American astronauts now entering the space race against Russia. It was JF Kennedy’s promise to start exploring space and eventually land on the moon that triggered this system of providing safe food for astronauts. Can you imagine a space traveller in a sealed space suit with food poisoning? Some of the symptoms of food poisoning include sickness and diarrhoea (the shits). So an astronaut with these symptoms would quickly fill their space suit and drown in their own bodily fluids….not a welcoming thought and something to put off even the most ardent of potential astronauts. HACCP was developed from a system perfected by jet fighter engineers for checking the safety of these airplanes. It was initiated by scientists, the military and later published by the Pillsbury Dough Corporation. Since the 1st January 2006 all food businesses, regardless of size, must use a Food Safety Management System based on HACCP, or rather, the principles of HACCP. UK law does make allowances for smaller food businesses and allows them to use a more flexible system which can be downloaded from the Food Standards Agency’s (FSA) website. It consists of diary entries, explanations, forms for completion, etc. That’s the background to HACCP, but what does HACCP do, why use it? In essence it is a system for preventing contamination entering the Food Safety Chain. The Food Safety Chain consists of links, much like a metal chain. Each link represents a process in the manufacturing of food for eventual consumption by consumers. We also use a phrase “From Farm to Fork”. The links include: Supplier Receipt Storage Preparation Cooking Serving Other links could be added as sub-links for example after storage, the food item might be ready for serving, or after cooking further preparation might be required. If food items are to be cooled for use in a cold dish, there would be a sub-link after cooking, i.e., chilling or cooling. http://food-safety-training.net
Views: 50033 Dave Summers
LEKTIO - HACCP (Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point)
 
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Découvrez l'une des formations proposées par Lektio : "L'HACCP". Disponible sur http://lektio.fr/
Views: 60 Lektio
Food Safety - Creating a HACCP Plan
 
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Learn how to protect your costumers from food-borne pathogens by creating a HACCP Plan. http://www.madgetech.com/ Artist: Tomasz Chrostowski Title: Another Success http://www.hooksounds.com
Views: 9023 MadgeTech, Inc.
Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP)
 
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Course Code : MVP-003 Video Presenter : M.K. Salooja
Views: 1536 ignousoa
HACCP - Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points - Part 1
 
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http://food-safety-training.net THazard Analysis Critical Control Points (HACCP) is a Food Safety Management System that was developed in the early 1960s for American astronauts now entering the space race against Russia. It was JF Kennedy’s promise to start exploring space and eventually land on the moon that triggered this system of providing safe food for astronauts. Can you imagine a space traveller in a sealed space suit with food poisoning? Some of the symptoms of food poisoning include sickness and diarrhoea (the shits). So an astronaut with these symptoms would quickly fill their space suit and drown in their own bodily fluids….not a welcoming thought and something to put off even the most ardent of potential astronauts. HACCP was developed from a system perfected by jet fighter engineers for checking the safety of these airplanes. It was initiated by scientists, the military and later published by the Pillsbury Dough Corporation. Since the 1st January 2006 all food businesses, regardless of size, must use a Food Safety Management System based on HACCP, or rather, the principles of HACCP. UK law does make allowances for smaller food businesses and allows them to use a more flexible system which can be downloaded from the Food Standards Agency’s (FSA) website. It consists of diary entries, explanations, forms for completion, etc. That’s the background to HACCP, but what does HACCP do, why use it? http://food-safety-training.net
Views: 14134 Dave Summers
HACCP - Hazard Analysis & Critical Control Points
 
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PMS Certification (Pvt.) Ltd is considered as one of the fastest growing certification body for different ISO Certification like ISO 9001:2015, ISO 14001:2015, ISO 27001:2013, ISO 22000:2005, ISO 50000:2011, ISO 20000:2011, OHSAS 18001:2007, HACCP, Halal and many more. Its head office is in United Kingdom. PMS Certification prides itself with delivering unprecedented business results to our local and international clients. . Our services empower you to function in a more sustainable and efficient way by enhancing quality and productivity, alleviating risks, verifying conformance and boosting the time it takes to get your product or service on the market. We would like to Invite your Organization to get ISO 9001 Certification through our channel. Our auditors are well capable and value added. Our services are designed to match individual client needs and to help them ensure their success. We make sure to establish a long-term partnership with our clients through continual improvement, integrity and trust.
HACCP - Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points - Part 1
 
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http://food-safety-training.net In essence HACCP is a system for preventing contamination entering the Food Safety Chain. The Food Safety Chain consists of links, much like a metal chain. Each link represents a process in the manufacturing of food for eventual consumption by consumers. We also use a phrase “From Farm to Fork”. The links include: Supplier Receipt Storage Preparation Cooking Serving Other links could be added as sub-links for example after storage, the food item might be ready for serving, or after cooking further preparation might be required. If food items are to be cooled for use in a cold dish, there would be a sub-link after cooking, i.e., chilling or cooling. The integrity of the Food Safety Chain must be upheld at each link or sub-link, in other words contamination must not be allowed to enter the Food Safety Chain at any link (or sub-link). What is contamination? The text book definition is the “Introduction or Presence of a Food Safety Hazard”. Drilling even deeper, a Hazard is “Anything with the Potential to Cause Harm. There are 4 main Food Contaminants: Biological, Physical, Chemical and Allergenic. Biological, or more often microbiological, includes bacteria, viruses, parasites and protists. They are responsible for 80% of all food poisoning outbreaks, mainly because they can’t be seen (they are microscopic) and they don’t produce any visual indication of their presence. (Unless they are food spoilage bacteria, which generally won’t hurt you but their presence is noticeable and our natural reaction is to reject the food). http://food-safety-training.net
Views: 1066 Dave Summers
HACCP Concept
 
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This is Power talk on HACCP by Dr Prabodh Halde President AFST ( I) Mumbai .
Views: 18749 Dr Prabodh Halde
HACCP - Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points - Part 8 - Control Measures
 
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http://food-safety-training.net HACCP - Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points - Part 8 - Control Measures Control measure Any action or activity that can be used to prevent or eliminate a food safety hazard or reduce it to an acceptable level, i.e. preventing things going wrong. More than one control measure may be required to control a specific hazard and more than one hazard may be controlled by a specific control measure. Controls can be applied to: • Temperature e.g. refrigerator or cooking • Time especially time at ambient • pH - pathogens won’t normally multiply below a pH of 4.0. Acids such as vinegar and lemon juice are used to reduce the pH • Fermentation - involves using acid-producing bacteria to lower the pH e.g. yoghurts and salami • aw - water activity. Most pathogenic bacteria will not multiply if the aw is below 0•89. Salt and sugar can be used to reduce the aw • The shape, size or weight. For example, smaller and thinner joints will cool more quickly • Additives - preservative such as nitrates • Visual assessment - e.g. colour change • Chemical analysis Generic controls In catering generic controls are more likely to be applied successfully. Generic controls may be applied to many products and by many businesses. keep sources of contamination out of food premises. Approved suppliers Staff vigilance and training Training of staff Planned programme essential - based on legal requirements, and hazards, controls, monitoring and corrective action for which they are responsible. All staff to be trained. Priority for supervisors, managers and high-risk food handlers. Induction, good hygiene practice/hazards, competency, refresher. Cleaning and disinfection Pest management Good personal hygiene Waste management Stock rotation Colour coding Good design Effective maintenance of premises and equipment Well constructed Protect/cover Segregation of raw and ready-to-eat foods Salt/sugar/acid Adjust pH Keep dry Size, weight and shape of joints Time management minimum time at ambient Storage temperatures -18ºC, 5ºC or 63ºC Cooking/processing Physical contamination controls Inspection belts Glass policy Wood policy Metal detection/magnets X-rays In catering, most potential physical and chemical controls are dealt with by prerequisite programmes personal hygiene/training, cleaning and effective pest control, vigilance, working in an orderly and tidy way, clean-as-you go, and effective supervision. The use of branded products and approved suppliers are the most effective controls to prevent purchasing raw ingredients which contain physical or chemical contaminants. Food containers especially glass jars/bottles • Use approved supplier - appropriate type and thickness of glass • Care in transport, unloading and storage • Bottle/jars passing on conveyor belt to filler should be inverted and blasted with compressed air or water jets • Protect open jars after 'cleaning' prior to filling • All steps should be routinely monitored • Procedure in place to deal with breakage - especially during filling • Line should be stopped. Empty jars/bottles should be checked - inverted/compressed air/waterspray • Product which may have been contaminated - put on hold • Filler - checked by maintenance/manufacturer • Area thoroughly cleaned • Recall may be necessary if contaminated product has left site • Report by engineer on action to take to prevent recurrence • HACCP plan should be reviewed- staff training Chemical contamination controls Don’t store food in chemical containers Separation of chemicals from food Don’t store chemicals in unmarked or food containers Rinsing following chemical cleaning Remember - many of these controls are part of the prerequisite programmes. This enables the HACCP plan to concentrate on the more significant hazards. HACCP - Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points haccp,haccp flow chart,haccp training plan, haccp certification, haccp food safety,haccp example, haccp stands for,haccp level 3, haccp UK, haccp guidelines,seven principles of haccp,haccp plan,haccp courses,haccp forms,haccp training,what is haccp,haccap,haacp,hasap,hazard assessment,haccp definition,haccp system,haccp standards,process hazard analysis,hassap,codex alimentarius haccp,hacpp,haccp certified https://youtu.be/R1P2hvYmvwQ http://food-safety-training.net
Views: 3021 Dave Summers
Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP)
 
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School of Continuing Education: Certificate Programme in Food Safety (CFS): BFN-003 : Food Safety and Quality Assurance
Views: 20554 ignousoce
HACCP - Making Food Products Safe, Part 1
 
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See how the seven principles of the Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) standard is used by processors for maintaining the safety of food products. HACCP is recognized as the single most effective way to eliminate, reduce or control hazards in any food handling or processing operation. Please visit our Website for more information: http://www.agriculture.alberta.ca/aha
HACCP - Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points - Part 15- Questions
 
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http://free-onlinecourses.com The provision of food hygiene training courses free online The Level 2 Award in Food Safety in Catering The Level 3 Award in Supervising Food Safety in Catering The Level 4 Award in Managing Food Safety in Catering Level 2 Award in HACCP for manufacturing Level 3 Award in supervising HACCP for manufacturing http://food-safety-training.net
Views: 978 Dave Summers
Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP)
 
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We are students of Bachelor in Food Service Technology students from Management & Science University (MSU), Malaysia were assigned to make an informative video regarding Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) for the subject Food Quality Control and Assurance. There are 7 principles of HACCP. What are they? Let's watch this video. Our group members are; Fadli Ayub, Nurhazirah Zainuddin, and Siti Noor Aimi. And also our gratitude goes to our lecturer, Madam Wan Ezie Adila binti Wan Adnan for imparting us with his wealth of knowledge, valuable guidance and experience. If you like this video, give a thumbs up and don't forget to share... TQ..
Views: 260 Fadli Ayub
Part 3. HACCP Principle 1:   Identifying Hazards
 
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Applying the 1st HACCP principle to your food safety plan in order to identify hazards specific to your food products and operation.
Views: 920 NRSBC
HACCP - Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points - Part 7 - Risk Assessment
 
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http://food-safety-training.net Factors to consider when undertaking hazard analysis Raw ingredients Are they likely to contain pathogens, toxins, chemical or physical hazards? Likelihood of low-dose pathogens in ready-to-eat food, especially fruit/salad vegetables? Have they been treated to destroy pathogens? Physical characteristics and composition of ingredients/product Include:pH, aw, level of preservatives,type of acid Can pathogens multiply and/or survive and produce toxins? Safety record of similar products Processing/preparation Is there a process step to destroy pathogens, spores and/or toxins? Is contamination after processing likely? Microbiology of food product Is the food likely to contain pathogens, toxins or spores? Could a change in the microbiological characteristics of food affect its safety? Premises design (prerequisite) Equipment design (prerequisite) Packaging Will the packaging protect the food from contamination? Could chemicals leach from the packaging? Does the packaging include essential safety information e.g. relating to allergens or storage temperature and shelf life? Cleaning and disinfection (prerequisite) Personal hygiene/training (prerequisite) Storage between packaging and consumption Could poor storage result in contamination or temperature abuse that could lead to unsafe food? Distribution Could contamination or multiplication occur? Intended use Is the food intended to be reheated by the consumer? Is there likely to be food left over, stored and reheated? Potential consumer abuse Intended consumer Is the food likely to be consumed by someone from a vulnerable group, e.g. the infirm, elderly, immunocompromised or pregnant women? http://food-safety-training.net
Views: 2162 Dave Summers
HACCP - Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points - Part 2
 
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http://food-safety-training.net Physical contamination is something, usually, that is physically noticed in the food product, such as hair, string, metal, stones, plastic, etc. This is generally more of a nuisance factor unless the contaminant is a food safety hazard such as glass shards. But even a hair in food is classed as contamination and is illegal. Chemical contamination is the introduction or presence of chemicals in food, which can give rise to more chronic effects on health. (Chronic = long term effects, Acute = short term effects). So cleaning chemicals, petrol fumes, aftershave/perfume, arsenic from pest control chemicals, agricultural residues, pesticides, an excess of additives/preservatives, etc. are all classed as chemical contaminants. Allergenic contamination is the presence or introduction of a substance that could invoke an allergic reaction from a consumer. The main allergens are referred to as “The Big 8”: Peanuts Tree Nuts Milk Protein Fish Shellfish Wheat Soya Eggs People can also be affected by seeds such as sesame or celery, fruit and vegetables and alcohol (especially the contents of alcoholic drinks such as sulphites or yeast). A severe allergic reaction to food can give rise to an anaphylactic shock (anaphylaxis), which is life threatening. Anaphylaxis is the body’s way of overcompensating for what it believes is the ingestion of “poison” The body is very adept in fighting infection, either from outside the body or within. Inside our body, for example, we have sensors covering the membranes of our mouth, throat and oesophagus. These sensors (Chemo-receptors to give them their correct name) monitor all food and drink that enter the mouth and oesophagus on its journey to the stomach and eventual digestion. If the sensors pick up signals of what is perceived to be a poison, i.e. something that could harm the human body, they send messages to the brain, which instigates an attack on the “poison”. Scientists have not worked out why this happens with allergens, as they are not poisonous, but the sensors mistakenly send signals to the brain to act accordingly. The attack mode the brain uses is to instruct cells from the immune system (white blood cells) to release histamine to attack the “perceived poison”. However, during anaphylaxis, the brain overcompensates and instructs too many of the cells to release the histamine. This results in symptoms of a rash, swelling of the throat and oesophagus and subsequent blocking of the trachea, causing respiratory failure, collapse and death. People who are subject to such attacks are prescribed an Epi-pen, which contains adrenalin. (Epi stands for Epinephrine, which is the American term for Adrenalin) When this is injected into the person’s thigh will cause the symptoms to subside. http://food-safety-training.net
Views: 2436 Dave Summers
HACCP - Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points - Part 14 - Documentation
 
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http://free-onlinecourses.com The provision of free haccp and food hygiene courses online The Level 2 Award in Food Safety in Catering The Level 3 Award in Supervising Food Safety in Catering The Level 4 Award in Managing Food Safety in Catering Level 2 Award in HACCP for manufacturing Level 3 Award in supervising HACCP for manufacturing http://food-safety-training.net
Views: 599 Dave Summers
Establishing Food Safety Monitoring Procedures: HACCP Principle #4
 
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After studying this lesson, you should be able to: - Describe the principle of monitoring and the responsibilities of the monitor - Prepare a monitoring plan and choose appropriate methods and equipment for monitoring - Establish the actions the monitor must take to ensure a safe product
Views: 4577 Clinton Stevenson
Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) Co ordinator interview questions
 
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Interview Questions for Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) Co ordinator.What makes your comforts about an Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) Co ordinator position?What pertinent Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) Co ordinator skills do you possess?What steps do you follow to study a problem before making a decision?Tell me about how you worked effectively under pressure.Do you prefer to work independently or on a team?
HACCP - Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points - Part 5
 
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http://food-safety-training.net Stages in the implementation of HACCP (The HACCP study) 1 Assemble and train the HACCP team. (define the terms of reference and the scope) 2 Describe the product/recipe/process. 3 Identify the intended use. 4 Construct a flow diagram and food-room layout showing product, personnel, equipment and waste flows 5 On-site verification of flow diagram and food room layout 6 Identify hazard/risk/severity and control measures. (Hazard analysis) 7 Determine critical control points using the decision tree. 8 Determine critical limits, target levels and tolerances for each critical control point. 9 Establish monitoring system for each CCP. 10 Establish actions to be taken when a CCP is moving out of control, and the corrective actions to be taken if a deviation occurs 11 Establish verification procedures (includes validation and review) 12 Establish record keeping and documentation. The twelve logical sequence steps for the implementation of HACCP (The HACCP study) Successful implementation of HACCP must be built on good hygiene practice and depends on: Culture of the organization Management commitment Effective management/supervision (including leadership of the HACCP team) Adequate resources (budget and time) Adequate training Access to scientific information Access to necessary expertise HACCP implementation must be carefully planned Full implementation - throughout all departments/products. Gradual implementation -department/product at a time. 1. Assemble the HACCP team (multidisciplinary expertise - external expertise may be required, especially for smaller businesses). Training will probably be required. The terms of reference (which product or groups of products/process) and the scope of the HACCP study (which hazards) should be determined. 2. Describe the product/recipe/process. Relevant safety information will include composition, aw, and pH. Processes such as heat-treatment, freezing, brining, and irradiation. Packaging, shelf life, storage conditions and method of distribution. 3. Identify intended use of the product i.e. how will the end user/consumer use the product, e.g. microwave reheating. Awareness of potential abuse, likely time out of temperature control. Will the product be consumed by vulnerable groups e.g. babies, immunocompromised or the elderly? 4. Construct a flow diagram. (It’s also usual to describe the process). The flow diagram must cover all steps in the operation. 5. On-site validation of the flow diagram. - 'walk the line' 6. Identify all potential hazards/risk/severity associated with each step, conduct a hazard analysis and consider any measures to control identified hazards (Principle 1). 7. Determine critical control points using the decision tree (Principle 2). External expertise may be required to support the HACCP team. However, a HACCP plan produced solely by an external consultant may not result in the essential sense of ownership by managers and operatives. 8 Determine critical limits, target levels and tolerances for each critical control point. (Principle 3) 9 Establish monitoring system for each CCP. (Principle 4) 10 Establish corrective actions to be taken if a deviation occurs i.e. a CCP is out of control. (Principle 5) 11 Establish verification procedures (includes validation and review). (Principle 6) 12 Establish documentation and record keeping. (Principle 7) http://food-safety-training.net
Views: 500 Dave Summers
HACCP - Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points - Part 3
 
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http://food-safety-training.net What are the steps in setting up a HACCP system? The Codex Alimentarius Commission has provided a 12-point system for setting this Food Safety Management System into operation: Bring together and provide training for the HACCP team and define the terms of reference. Provide a full description of the product, recipe and process. Identification of end user. Construction of flow diagram. Walk the Talk by confirming the flow diagram. Identification of hazards, risks, severity and control measures. Determination of the critical control points. Establishment of critical limits and target levels for each control point. Provision of a monitoring procedure for each critical control point. Corrective action to be undertaken when a critical control point is moving out of control. Introduce verification Establishment of documentation and what records require maintaining. The HACCP course is very straightforward to understand, although there are far too many definitions and phrases to remember, especially when the underlying principle of this system is to prevent contamination entering the Food Safety Chain. http://food-safety-training.net
Views: 1512 Dave Summers
Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP)
 
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Invensys presentation about ArchestrA Workflow and HACCP
Views: 967 InSourceSolutions
HACCP - Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points - Part 4
 
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http://food-safety-training.net Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points – HACCP So what is HACCP? Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points (HACCP) is a Food Safety Management System that was developed in the early 1960s for American astronauts now entering the space race against Russia. It was JF Kennedy’s promise to start exploring space and eventually land on the moon that triggered this system of providing safe food for astronauts. Can you imagine a space traveller in a sealed space suit with food poisoning? Some of the symptoms of food poisoning include sickness and diarrhoea (the shits). So an astronaut with these symptoms would quickly fill their space suit and drown in their own bodily fluids….not a welcoming thought and something to put off even the most ardent of potential astronauts. HACCP was developed from a system perfected by jet fighter engineers for checking the safety of these airplanes. It was initiated by scientists, the military and later published by the Pillsbury Dough Corporation. Since the 1st January 2006 all food businesses, regardless of size, must use a Food Safety Management System based on HACCP, or rather, the principles of HACCP. UK law does make allowances for smaller food businesses and allows them to use a more flexible system which can be downloaded from the Food Standards Agency’s (FSA) website. It consists of diary entries, explanations, forms for completion, etc. That’s the background to HACCP, but what does HACCP do, why use it? In essence it is a system for preventing contamination entering the Food Safety Chain. The Food Safety Chain consists of links, much like a metal chain. Each link represents a process in the manufacturing of food for eventual consumption by consumers. We also use a phrase “From Farm to Fork”. The links include: Supplier Receipt Storage Preparation Cooking Serving http://food-safety-training.net
Views: 862 Dave Summers
HACCP - Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points - Part 11 - Monitoring
 
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http://free-onlinecourses.com The provision of free haccp and food hygiene courses online The Level 2 Award in Food Safety in Catering The Level 3 Award in Supervising Food Safety in Catering The Level 4 Award in Managing Food Safety in Catering Level 2 Award in HACCP for manufacturing Level 3 Award in supervising HACCP for manufacturing http://food-safety-training.net
Views: 567 Dave Summers
Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point HACCP
 
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www.sistemmanajemen.com Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) Adalah suatu sistem kontrol dalam upaya pencegahan terjadinya masalah yang didasarkan atas identifikasi titik-titik kritis di dalam tahap penanganan dan proses produksi. HACCP merupakan salah satu bentuk manajemen resiko yang dikembangkan untuk menjamin keamanan pangan dengan pendekatan pencegahan (preventive) yang dianggap dapat memberikan jaminan dalam menghasilkan makanan yang aman bagi konsumen. ----------------
Views: 4722 sistem manajemen
Safe Food and Introduction to HACCP
 
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This Lecture talks about Safe Food and Introduction to HACCP
Views: 7602 cec
HACCP - Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points - Part 13 - Verification
 
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http://free-onlinecourses.com The provision of free haccp and food hygiene courses online The Level 2 Award in Food Safety in Catering The Level 3 Award in Supervising Food Safety in Catering The Level 4 Award in Managing Food Safety in Catering Level 2 Award in HACCP for manufacturing Level 3 Award in supervising HACCP for manufacturing http://food-safety-training.net
Views: 389 Dave Summers
HACCP Food Safety Course Online
 
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Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points is a systematic approach to indentifying and controlling hazards (i.e. microbiological, chemical or physical) that could pose a danger to the preparation of safe food. http://olivesafety.ie/
Views: 3284 olivesafety
HACCP Principle Four: Establishing Monitoring Procedures
 
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In this video Carissa Nath, AURI meat scientist, covers the elements of HACCP's 4th Principle--Establishing Monitoring Procedures.
HACCP Food Safety Overview
 
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An overview by the Agricultural Utilization Research Institue of the HACCP approach to food safety and its seven principles.
Preventive Controls and HACCP
 
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The FDA released their final rules for risk-based preventive controls in September 2015 and compliance dates for some business begin as early as September 2016. As a result, all FDA-registered US food manufacturing facilities as well as facilities located in foreign countries and exporting to the US will have to update their food safety programs to meet new FSMA requirements. Although most food facilities are already providing hazard analysis through their HACCP Plans, FDA’s HARPC requirements are quite different. Learn about FSMA’s requirements for hazard analysis and preventive controls rule so that you can make changes and updates to your programs before your compliance deadline arrives. After this webinar you’ll know more about: - Written Analysis of Hazards - Identification of Preventive Controls - Monitoring of Preventive Controls - Corrective Actions for Ineffective or Absent Preventive Controls - Verification of Preventive Controls - Preventive Control Records - Radiological Hazards - Validation of Process Controls - Qualified Individual - Exceptions Download the Presentation Slides and Certificate of Attendance from the IFSQN website: https://www.ifsqn.com/forum/index.php/files/file/239-preventive-controls-and-haccp/
HACCP - Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points - Part 7 - Risk Assessment
 
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http://food-safety-training.net Hazard analysis CODEX states that: Hazard analysis involves evaluating information on the hazards and conditions leading to their presence to decide which are significant to food safety and therefore should be addressed by the HACCP plan. This will involve assessing the likelihood of the hazards (the risk) and the severity of their adverse effects on health. Using the flow diagram, all the potential hazards at each step should be listed and hazard analysis carried out on each hazard. Identify hazards at each step • Presence of contaminants (including allergens) • Multiplication or survival of pathogens • Production of toxins • Germination of spores Factors to consider when undertaking hazard analysis Raw ingredients Are they likely to contain pathogens, toxins, chemical or physical hazards? Likelihood of low-dose pathogens in ready-to-eat food, especially fruit/salad vegetables? Have they been treated to destroy pathogens? Physical characteristics and composition of ingredients/product Include:pH, aw, level of preservatives,type of acid Can pathogens multiply and/or survive and produce toxins? Safety record of similar products Processing/preparation Is there a process step to destroy pathogens, spores and/or toxins? Is contamination after processing likely? Microbiology of food product Is the food likely to contain pathogens, toxins or spores? Could a change in the microbiological characteristics of food affect its safety? Premises design (prerequisite) Equipment design (prerequisite) Packaging Will the packaging protect the food from contamination? Could chemicals leach from the packaging? Does the packaging include essential safety information e.g. relating to allergens or storage temperature and shelf life? Cleaning and disinfection (prerequisite) Personal hygiene/training (prerequisite) Storage between packaging and consumption Could poor storage result in contamination or temperature abuse that could lead to unsafe food? Distribution Could contamination or multiplication occur? Intended use Is the food intended to be reheated by the consumer? Is there likely to be food left over, stored and reheated? Potential consumer abuse Intended consumer Is the food likely to be consumed by someone from a vulnerable group, e.g. the infirm, elderly, immunocompromised or pregnant women? http://food-safety-training.net
Views: 509 Dave Summers
Pelatihan Hazard Analysis & Critical Control Point  (HACCP) 2018
 
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Pelatihan Hazard Analysis & Critical Control Point (HACCP) merupakan program kerja Divisi Keprofesian HIMAGIZI. Pelatihan HACCP berlangsung selama tiga hari berturut-turut, pemateri menyampaikan sebanyak 10 materi dengan diakhiri sesi tanya jawab pada setiap materi.
Views: 96 HIMAGIZI IPB
HACCP - Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points - Part 5
 
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http://food-safety-training.net Stages in the implementation of HACCP (The HACCP study) 1 Assemble and train the HACCP team. (define the terms of reference and the scope) 2 Describe the product/recipe/process. 3 Identify the intended use. 4 Construct a flow diagram and food-room layout showing product, personnel, equipment and waste flows 5 On-site verification of flow diagram and food room layout 6 Identify hazard/risk/severity and control measures. (Hazard analysis) 7 Determine critical control points using the decision tree. 8 Determine critical limits, target levels and tolerances for each critical control point. 9 Establish monitoring system for each CCP. 10 Establish actions to be taken when a CCP is moving out of control, and the corrective actions to be taken if a deviation occurs 11 Establish verification procedures (includes validation and review) 12 Establish record keeping and documentation. The twelve logical sequence steps for the implementation of HACCP (The HACCP study) Successful implementation of HACCP must be built on good hygiene practice and depends on: Culture of the organization Management commitment Effective management/supervision (including leadership of the HACCP team) Adequate resources (budget and time) Adequate training Access to scientific information Access to necessary expertise HACCP implementation must be carefully planned Full implementation - throughout all departments/products. Gradual implementation -department/product at a time. 1. Assemble the HACCP team (multidisciplinary expertise - external expertise may be required, especially for smaller businesses). Training will probably be required. The terms of reference (which product or groups of products/process) and the scope of the HACCP study (which hazards) should be determined. 2. Describe the product/recipe/process. Relevant safety information will include composition, aw, and pH. Processes such as heat-treatment, freezing, brining, and irradiation. Packaging, shelf life, storage conditions and method of distribution. 3. Identify intended use of the product i.e. how will the end user/consumer use the product, e.g. microwave reheating. Awareness of potential abuse, likely time out of temperature control. Will the product be consumed by vulnerable groups e.g. babies, immunocompromised or the elderly? 4. Construct a flow diagram. (It’s also usual to describe the process). The flow diagram must cover all steps in the operation. 5. On-site validation of the flow diagram. - 'walk the line' 6. Identify all potential hazards/risk/severity associated with each step, conduct a hazard analysis and consider any measures to control identified hazards (Principle 1). 7. Determine critical control points using the decision tree (Principle 2). External expertise may be required to support the HACCP team. However, a HACCP plan produced solely by an external consultant may not result in the essential sense of ownership by managers and operatives. 8 Determine critical limits, target levels and tolerances for each critical control point. (Principle 3) 9 Establish monitoring system for each CCP. (Principle 4) 10 Establish corrective actions to be taken if a deviation occurs i.e. a CCP is out of control. (Principle 5) 11 Establish verification procedures (includes validation and review). (Principle 6) 12 Establish documentation and record keeping. (Principle 7) http://food-safety-training.net
Views: 3299 Dave Summers
How to identify Critical Control Points (CCP's)
 
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The Food Training Insitute can be found at www.foodbusinesstraining.com The basis of your HACCP based food safety program is the identification and control of hazards. As part of this process, Codex HACCP provides for the application of Principle 1 -- Conduct the hazard analysis and Principle 2 -- Determine the Critical Control Points (CCPs). If the process of identification, analysis and determining CCPs is not undertaken correctly, there can be a significant impact on both your business and your customers. Impacts can include product recall, injury, illness, customer complaints or decreased business profit. How to identify Critical Control Points (correctly) provides a step-by-step guide for members of the HACCP team to follow. The training is presented in separate modules which breaks down key learning's, steps and processes in an easy to understand format. The course material includes: ■ How to develop and document Flow Process Charts. ■ How to identify hazards for your raw materials and process steps. ■ How to complete the Hazard Analysis using risk assessment tools. ■ How to identify and implement measures to control identified hazards. ■ How to identify Critical Control Points using the Codex CCP decision tree. A selection of food safety HACCP tools and templates are provided as part of this training. This training is suitable for all members of the Food Safety supervisors, HACCP team members, QA professionals, food auditors and food consultants. A great course to developing your HACCP Plan or as a refresher for reviewing your current HACCP Food Safety Program. For more information about this online training please visit http://foodbusinesstraining.com/product-descriptions/how-to-identify-critical-control-points-ccps/
Views: 8964 Salamada Food