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Search results “How to write scholarly articles for journals”
Writing a journal paper
 
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The presentation explores the content of a journal paper regarding its form, structure and content. Presentation related documents can be found under this link: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/0ps4io3q0w5n0up/AADWrNNY2pe0sjWiqqV_qhK-a?dl=0
Views: 20129 Shady Attia
13 Tips for Writing a Great Journal Article
 
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13 TIPS FOR WRITING A GREAT JOURNAL ARTICLE: This short video by John Bond of Riverwinds Consulting gives tips on writing a journal article. FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com JOHN'S NEW BOOK is “Scholarly Publishing: A Primer” To find out more about the book: https://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/about-scholarly-publishing Buy it at Amazon: http://amzn.to/2jqaLPp SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj/ Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192/ Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond/ TRANSCRIPT Hi there. I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I have 13 tips for writing a great academic article or paper. First, let us start before any writing has occurred. Think about whether the effort is justified. Is the topic new and novel in the field? Is the article about a particularly timely topic in your area? Don’t just write an article because you can; rather look to make a difference. Second, think about where you want to submit the manuscript. Be a loyal reader of any journal you intend to submit to; do not just pick one out of an online search. Know the mission of the publication. This will allow you to focus your writing on that journal. Third, follow the instruction or guidelines for authors for that journal very closely, particularly in regard to length and format. Now, let us look at mechanics. The fourth tip is to follow closely the appropriate style manual. Whether the AMA, APA, Chicago style guides, or others, you will benefit by understanding these guidelines in your field. Fifth, short and concise is always better. This applies to the entire manuscript but also to sentence length and paragraph length as well. No one ever said, “I wish that paper was longer.” Ruthlessly delete all extraneous materials. Sixth, follow accepted practices in regard to grammar and style. If you do not know the expected practices find someone that does. Also, read the articles in the journals you are submitting to so you can understand the tone of these articles. Now, let us look at the content presentation. Seventh, when the paper is written, review the abstract very, very closely. Many people will read only the abstract and it needs to be flawless. Make sure it conforms to the abstract format in your intended publication. Eight, consider the article title very carefully. Avoid a boring title which is really just a label. Consider something thought provoking or maybe even provocative, but do not stray so far that it is corny or sensational. Ninth, make sure any tables, charts, images, or graphics are essential and created in a quality fashion. Does each item standalone by itself? Lastly, let us consider the review of the manuscript before submission. My tenth tip is to read the final manuscript aloud several times. This helps for clarity and language. Eleventh, aside from having the content reviewed by your peers before submission, have others outside your field read the paper as well. Listen closely to any suggestions they have. Twelfth, avoid any hint of plagiarism. Always cite your sources. Never take any passage or ideas from others. An error here can affect your career or reputation. Finally, I know many people that watch these videos are non-English language speakers that may be submitting to an English language journal. If so, I suggest having a native English language colleague or speaker read and help craft the paper before submission. This will likely increase the quality of the final product and therefore increase the likelihood of acceptance. If you do not know anyone to help with this, there are many editorial services that will now assist for a fee. Or email me for suggestions of editors that can help with this. At the end of the day, there is no secret to success. Attention to detail and a careful review of the language will hopefully improve your work.
Views: 12141 John Bond
What to think about before you start to write a journal article
 
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Discover the four A’s with editor Professor David Simon, as he offers advice on what to think about before you start to write an article. About us: Taylor & Francis Group partners with world-class authors, from leading scientists and researchers, to scholars and professionals operating at the top of their fields. Together, we publish in all areas of the Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, Technology and Medicine sectors. We are one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, eBooks, text books and reference works. For more author insights follow us at: https://www.facebook.com/tandfauthorservices https://twitter.com/tandfauthorserv https://www.linkedin.com/company/taylor-&-francis-group To browse our 2600+ journals visit: http://www.tandfonline.com And learn more about Informa at: https://informa.com/
Views: 72344 Taylor & Francis
Tips for writing journal article summaries
 
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NOTE: This video is aimed at students working on one specific "journal article summary" assignment in my classes. So others may find it helpful, but please always keep in mind that different instructors will want different things in your work. Suggestions on how to write cohesive, succinct summaries. This includes advice on what information to include and what to omit, and information about common mistakes that students frequently make on this assignment.
Views: 76212 Rachelle Tannenbaum
How to Read, Take Notes On and Understand Journal Articles | Essay Tips
 
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The first pilot to my Essay Tips series! I share my method for reading and understanding a journal article or paper quickly and efficiently including how to take good, concise notes and remember useful citations. If your method differs from mine or you think you can give me some pointers then let me know in the comments! This is the first in a series of videos I'm hoping to produce while undertaking my PhD at the University of Exeter on tips for students at university or college whether undergraduate, postgraduate or otherwise. Note: The programme to the left (which I highlight in) is Mendeley. Apologies for forgetting to state this in the video!! If you've enjoyed this video then please do check out the rest of my channel. I generally put out new videos every Tuesday and Friday discussing theatre and playwriting from the perspective of an aspirant and (some might say) emerging playwright, theatre maker and academic. My tagging system was borrowed from this article on The Thesis Whisperer: https://thesiswhisperer.com/2015/10/28/how-evernote-can-help-you-with-your-literature-review/ Further Reading The Academic Skills Handbook by Diana Hopkins and Tom Reid US: https://amzn.to/2NBDAnf UK: https://amzn.to/2NBJIfb The Study Skills Handbook by Stella Cottrell US: https://amzn.to/2NDeIvh UK: https://amzn.to/2OTyneu [The above are affiliate links. I receive a small kickback from anything you buy which, in turn, helps to support the channel.]
Views: 73620 Tom Nicholas
How to Write for Academic Journal?
 
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ISET Policy Institute Dr. Randall Filer, Hunter College, the City University of New York - discusses Dos and Don'ts of writing for academic journals. This video is best for people who are looking for some tips in academic writing - especially those who are aiming their papers to high-end journals.
Views: 25492 ISETchannel
How to Write the Academic Critique Assignment--Critique of Academic Journal Article
 
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Review of a model APA paper for the critique and presentation assignment of PSYC 334, Summer 2014.
Views: 101489 David Taylor
How to write a reflective journal (Counselling & Psychotherapy)
 
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Need help with assignments? -- Click Here http://www.counsellingtutor.com/counselling-assignment-help-guide/ How to write a reflective journal ( Counselling & Psychotherapy) (CLICK TO SHOW MORE) My channel is all about learning counselling theories so be sure to subscribe. I would love to hear your comments; please comment below and I will answer you. Please click the thumbs up button and like this video and be sure to share it with your friends. About This video I discuss the importance of writing a reflective journal for counsellors and psychotherapists -------------------------------------- SUBSCRIBE TO MY YOUTUBE CHANNEL http://www.youtube.com/user/Counsellingresource LIKE US ON FACEBOOK https://www.facebook.com/counsellingresources DOWNLOAD Free counselling book @ http://www.counsellingtutor.com/
Views: 53452 CounsellingTutor
How to use Google Scholar to find journal articles | Essay Tips
 
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My second essay tips video. Conducting a comprehensive literature review is an important part of any research project. Here are my tips for how to use Google Scholar effectively to quickly and easily find the academic papers, journal articles or books you need to write that essay or complete that dissertation. This is the second in a series of videos I'm hoping to produce while undertaking my PhD at the University of Exeter on tips for students at university or college whether undergraduate, postgraduate or otherwise. Further Reading The Academic Skills Handbook by Diana Hopkins and Tom Reid US: https://amzn.to/2NBDAnf UK: https://amzn.to/2NBJIfb The Study Skills Handbook by Stella Cottrell US: https://amzn.to/2NDeIvh UK: https://amzn.to/2OTyneu [The above are affiliate links. I receive a small kickback from anything you buy which, in turn, helps to support the channel.] If you've enjoyed this video and would like to see more including my What The Theory? series in which I provide some snappy introductions to key theories in the humanities as well as PhD vlogs in which I talk about some of the challenges of being a PhD student then do consider subscribing. Thanks for watching! Twitter: @Tom_Nicholas Website: www.tomnicholas.com
Views: 69645 Tom Nicholas
11. How to write  journal or conference paper using templates in MS Word 2007?
 
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Md Aktaruzzaman Assistant Professor, IUT, Gazipur, Bangladesh PhD Student, Monash Uni, Melbourne, Australia
Views: 43552 akhtariut
Tips from a journal editor: How to select a journal for your paper?
 
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In this video, Bruce Dancik reveals what journal editors actually look for in a manuscript. He provides useful tips on how an author can find out which journal would be interested to publish his/her research and explains some of the important factors that an author should consider while choosing a suitable journal. This video is a part of an interview series in which Donald Samulack, President, US Operations, Editage, Cactus Communications, speaks to Bruce P. Dancik, Editor-in-Chief, NRC Research Press/Canadian Science Publishing, and Professor Emeritus, Dept. of Renewable Resources, University of Alberta, at the 54th Annual Meet of the Council of Science Editors in 2011. For more insights into the publication process, visit http://www.editage.com/insights/
Views: 17051 Editage Insights
Types of Scholarly Articles
 
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Identify the types of articles you will find in a scholarly journal. This video addresses examples of empirical studies, literature reviews, and editorials.
Views: 25797 VCU Libraries
How To Read a Scholarly Journal Article
 
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Recognize the structure of scholarly articles in order to use them most effectively in your research projects. With Tim Lockman, Kishwaukee College librarian.
How Do I Choose the Best Journal for My Paper?
 
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HOW DO I CHOOSE THE BEST JOURNAL FOR MY PAPER? Which journal is the best one in scholarly publishing for my paper? This video lists the decision points when making this decision. MORE VIDEOS on Choosing Which Journal to Publish Your Article https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLqkE49N6nq3jkGjy26P2tVNragL2ik0c2 FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192 Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond BOOKS by John Bond: The Story of You: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/the-story-of-you/about-the-book/ You Can Write and Publish a Book: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/you-can-write-and-publish-a-book/about-the-book/ TRANSCRIPT: How do I decide the best journal for my paper? Hi there, I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am to going to be discussing how to choose a scholarly journal for you to submit your paper to. A bit about me: I’ve been in scholarly publishing for over 25 year and as Chief Content Officer for a major medical publisher oversaw the publishing of over 20,000 peer reviewed articles. So, you have collected your data and information or completed your study. You have written your paper. Now what? Prior to deciding, make sure you have had the paper read and critiqued by your colleagues and associates. Consider very carefully their feedback and make the changes where you see fit. Remember to give it one more very close check for grammar, spelling, format and style before moving on. Now you are ready. In starting to consider where to submit your paper, create a chart or list of the options under consideration. Include the journals you read and receive; and the ones you respect. Ask your co-workers and colleagues what journals best fit the topic of your paper and have them weigh in on their opinions on the publications. In your chart, list these journal names and their urls. Most journal website will have an About section that will list the Mission or Aims and Scope of the publication. Read them and see if they align with your content and article format. Add to the chart the journal’s frequency; that is monthly, bimonthly, quarterly. Closely review the Information for Authors published for each Journal, likely at their website. This is the best guide to see if your article is a fit and will save everyone time. Read it very closely. Not just their mission but also the specifications for format and types of articles that are interested in. Also, if a journal has an Impact Factor, it may be listed at their website. If not, sometimes searching the web for that journal’s current Impact Factor will give you an answer. List whether the journal is subscription based, or sent to members of a Society, or an Open Access publication. Sometimes a journal may be more than one of these. If it is Open Access, check out the APC or Author Processing Charge and include the amount, if any. The more widely the journal is available, for example an Open Access publication, the more your article will get downloaded and read. Next check on where the journal is indexed. For instance, in medicine or nursing, being included in Medline or CINAHL are essential. Check for your area of specialty to see if the journal is covered in your key abstracting and indexing service. Once again, go the website and ensure articles are included online in addition to in the paper version of the journal. Are they posted online at acceptance or only when a print version appears? What may be listed at a website is the average time a paper takes to get from submission to decision and then the time it takes to get from acceptance to being published. If your topic has a sense of urgency to it, this time can be a critical decision. These times may not be publicly available. On occasion, the acceptance rate or rejection rate from the previous year may be listed. This would be a key piece of data as well. Search your topic over at a journal’s website to see if they have published any articles on it over the past two years. Most journals are looking for new or novel takes on existing topics and you might want to see what they have recently published. Finally, submit to just one journal at a time. I know it is tempting to reduce the wait time and send out to many journals or publications, but etiquette (and ethics) demand one at a time only.....
Views: 16200 John Bond
How to Write a Paper in a Weekend (By Prof. Pete Carr)
 
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In this video, Prof. Carr (faculty member at the University of Minnesota, Department of Chemistry) is explaining the Algorithm of writing a paper in a weekend.
RESEARCH PAPERS | Read Articles Easily
 
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Here's how you can read research papers and articles as quickly and efficiently as possible, regardless of whether they are for class or writing your own papers. Support the channel and become a Patron! Earn exclusive perks. Visit https://patreon.com/medschoolinsiders 00:39 Determine the importance of reading the paper 01:43 Don't read the paper in order 02:48 Understand significance and limitations 04:43 Organize your notes and thoughts 05:44 Proficiency in research is a long term game =============== Connect with me! WEBSITE: https://medschoolinsiders.com TWITTER: https://twitter.com/MedInsiders FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/medschoolinsiders INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/medschoolinsiders AMAZON STORE: https://www.amazon.com/shop/medschoolinsiders =============== Music: http://soundcloud.com/iamryanlittle May include affiliate links to Amazon. As an Amazon Associate, I may earn a commission on qualifying purchases made through them (at no extra cost to you). Disclaimer: Content of this video is my opinion and does not constitute medical advice. The content and associated links provide general information for general educational purposes only. Use of this information is strictly at your own risk. Kevin Jubbal, M.D. and Med School Insiders LLC will not assume any liability for direct or indirect losses or damages that may result from the use of information contained in this video including but not limited to economic loss, injury, illness or death.
Views: 29574 Med School Insiders
How To Write An Article Review (Definition, Types, Formatting)
 
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In this video, James from EssayPro explains how to write an article review from start to finish. In the beginning, James states an article review is a critical, constructive evaluation of literature in a particular field through summary, classification, analysis, and comparison. If it is a scientific review article that uses database searches to portray the research. The article review is broken down into 5 core parts: Summarization, classification, analysis, critiques, and comparison. These core parts require one to use theories, ideas, and research, relevant to the subject area of the article. Afterward, James mentions that there are different types of article reviews. First of all, there is the journal article review which will evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of an article. Next, there is the research article review which differs from a journal article review by the way that it evaluates the research methods used and holds that information in retrospect to analysis and critique. Lastly, there is the scientific article review which involves anything in the realm of science. Often, scientific articles include more information on the background that you can use to analyze the article in a more comprehensive way. Afterwards, James explains the importance of properly formatting an article review. The steps involved in this process are: 1. Pre-title page: here, you will want to list the type of the article that you are reviewing, the title of the article, all the authors who contributed to the article, authors affiliations (position, department, institute, city, state, country, email ID) 2. Optional corresponding author details: name, address, phone number, email, and fax number. 3. Running head: This is only in APA format. It is the title of your paper shortened to less than 40 characters. 4. Summary page: This can be optional, depending on what your instructor assigns. The summary should be a maximum of 800 words long. Use simple and non-technical language. Do not repeat text verbatim or give references in this section. 5. Title page: which will contain your title (obviously) 6. An Introduction 7. The Body: Include headings and subheadings 8. A Works Cited/or References page 9. Possibly followed by Tables and Figure legends (if instructed by the professor) After finishing your rough draft, make sure to do these last 3 steps: 1. Summarize the Article Make a summary of the article by revisiting what the author has written about. Note relevant facts and findings of the article. Include the author's conclusions in this section. 2. Critique the Article Present the strengths and weaknesses that you have found in the article. In addition, highlight the knowledge that the author has contributed in the field. Also, write about the gaps and contradictions in the article. Take a standpoint of either supporting or not with the author's assertions but support your arguments with facts and relevant theories that are pertinent to the area of knowledge. Rubrics and templates can also be used to evaluate and grade the person reviewing the article. 3. Crafting a Conclusion In this section, revisit the key points of your piece, your findings of the article, and your critique. Also write about the accuracy, validity, and relevance of the results of the article review. Give the way forward for future research in the field of study. Lastly, re-read your piece a day after you finished writing it. This will help you spot grammar mistakes and see any flaws in the organization so you aren’t having to make tons of revisions due to small errors.
Views: 10289 EssayPro
How to Cite a Journal Article in APA Style
 
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This short video walks through the basic format of an in-text citation and full citation for a journal article from a database in APA Style.
Views: 39090 HelenaCollegeLibrary
How to Get Published in a Peer-Review Journal: Presentation
 
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Bob Löwenberg, MD, PhD Blood Editor-in-Chief Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherland
Summarizing a Journal Article
 
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Describes a writing technique known as summarizing.
Views: 16607 St. Kate's Library
Dissecting a Peer Reviewed Scholarly Journal Article
 
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This video will show you how to quickly dissect a peer-reviewed scholarly journal article for discussing in a research paper or course discussion board.
Views: 11365 DrCraigMarkson
How to Write a Research Paper
 
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I'm going to go over the steps you can take to write your first research paper! Research papers have long been something only academics did, but the Internet has offered us several ways to democratize this process. Journals like Arxiv are open for public submissions, machine learning papers are generally open source so anyone can learn from them, and online communities offer advice in the way previously only a professor could. I'll go through these tips in order in as much detail as I can on how to write a research paper. Please Subscribe! And like. And comment. That's what keeps me going. Want more education? Connect with me here: Twitter: https://twitter.com/sirajraval Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sirajology instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sirajraval More learning resources: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1AYxMbYZQ1Y https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UiTaxAfIBPg https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oPobmEZ4lfs&t=242s https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KlgR1q3UQZE https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DS2DOEkorDo&t=220s OpenAI's request for research: https://openai.com/requests-for-research/ Some of my papers: http://www.sirajcoin.io/whitepaper.html https://docs.google.com/document/d/1QFyBUV8pKqgl__4J1zT0BmIYfTYF8hnlyalOo7PJvLM/edit?usp=sharing (i turned this one into a book actually [Decentralized Applications]) Join us in the Wizards Slack channel: http://wizards.herokuapp.com/ And please support me on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/user?u=3191693 Signup for my newsletter for exciting updates in the field of AI: https://goo.gl/FZzJ5w Hit the Join button above to sign up to become a member of my channel for access to exclusive content!
Views: 182561 Siraj Raval
How to search for a journal article using a topic
 
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Searching for journal articles, using a topic?
Views: 5365 uofg
MLA Style Works Cited List: Citing Journal Articles
 
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UPDATE: MLA has published a new, 8th edition. Some of the recommendations for citing are quite different. We are currently working on a new video series. Please see our online guide for help with MLA 8th edition: http://www.library.mun.ca/researchtools/guides/citations/mla/ This video explains how to format your paper according to the 7th edition of the MLA Handbook. We'll go over margins (1:02), font (1:10), spacing (1:15), page numbering (1:19), title page (1:36), tables/figures (2:22) and Works Cited list (3:41). The content was created by Crystal Rose, Public Services Librarian, Memorial University Libraries, in partnership with the university's department of Distance Education, Learning & Teaching Support. Other videos in this series: Citing Sources in MLA Style: A Basic Introduction - http://youtu.be/Xf_hSUeQ088 MLA Style Works Cited List: Citing Books - http://youtu.be/zo2F7HBtT_Q MLA Style Works Cited List: Citing eBooks - http://youtu.be/RZst9tCUdcA MLA Style Works Cited List: How to Cite Graphic Novels - http://youtu.be/wiWR5mJUfpo MLA Style Works Cited List: How to Cite Websites - http://youtu.be/MbboKTst55Y MLA Style Works Cited List: Citing Journal Articles - http://youtu.be/TtBjDQHd1MA MLA Style Works Cited List: Citing Newspapers & Magazines - http://youtu.be/A1E43-c_2Fg How to Cite Multiple Authors in MLA Style - http://youtu.be/gtWp8kXOwbA What to do with a "Citation Within a Citation" in MLA Style - http://youtu.be/VSgZs9MGqmw How to Cite Poetry, Song Lyrics, & Plays in MLA Style - http://youtu.be/wBEwT537I38
Selecting a journal for a publication
 
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This video presentation differentiate the different types of publication with a focus on journals. Concepts such as peer reviewing, Eigenfactor and Impact Factor are described. The presentation presents and explores different bibliometric indicators and journal ranking list including the Scimago Ranking, SCI Index and Google journals ranking. We also elaborate on the importance if Impact Factor for journals selection and its influence of researchers H-Index. The of the presentation to help researchers to select a journal for their publications.
Views: 12259 Shady Attia
How to Analyze Scholarly Articles
 
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This is the CSU-Pueblo University Library Quick Class on How to Analyze Scholarly Articles. For more information, visit: http://library.csupueblo.edu
PhD: How to write a great research paper
 
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Writing papers and giving talks are key skills for any researcher, but they arenΓÇÖt easy. In this pair of presentations, IΓÇÖll describe simple guidelines that I follow for writing papers and giving talks, which I think may be useful to you too. I donΓÇÖt have all the answersΓÇöfar from itΓÇöand I hope that the presentation will evolve into a discussion in which you share your own insights, rather than a lecture.
Views: 81043 Microsoft Research
Understanding Scholarly Journal Articles
 
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A presentation that defines a scholarly journal article and how a typical journal article is structured.
Views: 27730 trcclibrary
APA Style Reference List: How to Reference Journal Articles
 
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This video is based on the 6th edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association. It explains how to include journal and magazine articles with a volume/issue number in your Reference List for both print (0:29) and online with a DOI (1:57) and online without a DOI (2:54), and where to find the information you need for your reference (2:13). For articles without any volume or issue number watch our video "APA Style Reference List: How to Reference Newpapers, Newsletters, & Magazines Articles - http://youtu.be/3T5bx5HVPwc The content was created by Crystal Rose, Public Services Librarian, Memorial University Libraries, in partnership with the university's department of Distance Education, Learning & Teaching Support. Other videos in the APA series: Referencing Sources in APA Style: A Basic Introduction - http://youtu.be/gGtkh_-9OC0 How to Format Your Paper in APA Style - http://youtu.be/dYRZh-llIBo How to Reference Books: http://youtu.be/QkFyDiSgSBM How to Reference eBooks: http://youtu.be/RGHquh2V6fk How to Reference Websites: http://youtu.be/4tNfa2zVuWE How to Reference Canadian Government Documents: http://youtu.be/HskLqwlEqf0 How to Reference Multiple Authors - http://youtu.be/gNYr5Ue-6gk How to Reference a Citation Within a Citation - http://youtu.be/rqui6nHVYMw
How to turn your dissertation into a journal article - Andrew Lambirth
 
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Visit the journal here: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1741-4369 Andrew Lambirth, editorial board member at Literacy, explains how to turn your dissertation into a journal article.
Views: 5603 davidheweswiley
Finding online sources for your research paper
 
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This video explains how to use google scholar to find research papers to use as the background of your experiment and as sources in your paper. Table of Contents: 00:08 - Types of sources 01:45 - Google Scholar 03:10 - Dowloading PDFs 04:10 - Using reference lists 05:25 - Using the "cited by" link 06:20 - Refining your search terms and using operators 07:50 - Using Wikipedia 08:55 - Using Science Daily
Views: 121177 Steve Kirk
How to Read a Research Paper
 
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Ever wondered how I consume research so fast? I'm going to describe the process i use to read lots of machine learning research papers fast and efficiently. It's basically a 3-pass approach, i'll go over the details and show you the extra resources I use to learn these advanced topics. You don't have to be a PhD, anyone can read research papers. It just takes practice and patience. Please Subscribe! And like. And comment. That's what keeps me going. Want more education? Connect with me here: Twitter: https://twitter.com/sirajraval Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sirajology instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sirajraval More learning resources: http://www.arxiv-sanity.com/ https://www.reddit.com/r/MachineLearning/ https://www.elsevier.com/connect/infographic-how-to-read-a-scientific-paper https://www.quora.com/How-do-I-start-reading-research-papers-on-Machine-Learning https://www.reddit.com/r/MachineLearning/comments/6rj9r4/d_how_do_you_read_mathheavy_machine_learning/ https://machinelearningmastery.com/how-to-research-a-machine-learning-algorithm/ http://www.sciencemag.org/careers/2016/03/how-seriously-read-scientific-paper Join us in the Wizards Slack channel: http://wizards.herokuapp.com/ And please support me on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/user?u=3191693 Signup for my newsletter for exciting updates in the field of AI: https://goo.gl/FZzJ5w Hit the Join button above to sign up to become a member of my channel for access to exclusive content!
Views: 236047 Siraj Raval
Peer Review in 3 Minutes
 
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How do articles get peer reviewed? What role does peer review play in scholarly research and publication? This video will explain. This video is published under a Creative Commons 3.0 BY-NC-SA US license. License, credits, and contact information can be found here: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/tutorials/peerreview/ Feel free to link to / embed our videos!
Views: 285054 libncsu
Best Journal for your research article/paper | Elsevier, Springer and IEEE
 
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This video suggest you to best journal for your article. The following links will help you. http://journalfinder.elsevier.com/ http://www.springer.com/?SGWID=0-102-12-988548-0 http://publication-recommender.ieee.org/
Views: 24487 Scientific Rana
Parts of a scholarly journal article
 
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This video demonstrates the parts of a scholarly or academic journal article. Offers pictures and brief descriptions of the sections including abstract, reference list, discussion, and methods. The video aims to help students understand academic articles.
Views: 7820 Bowman Library
Evaluating Journal Articles with the CAARP Test
 
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A brief tutorial on evaluating journal articles and websites for use in academic research. You will learn how to critically apply evaluation criteria to an article in order to determine its quality and usefulness as a research source. This video is primarily for students in ENGL 102 who are completing the Article Review Essay.
Views: 18719 Melissa Mallon
Evaluating a journal article
 
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Use our Evaluating Sources checklist to learn how to identify a scholarly journal article.
Views: 3817 JCU Library
Turning Your Thesis into a Journal Article
 
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Turning Your Thesis into a Journal Article. This short video by John Bond of Riverwinds Consulting discusses the process to turn your thesis or dissertation into a journal article. JOHN'S NEW BOOK is “You Can Write and Publish a Book, Second Edition” Buy it at Amazon: https://amzn.to/2PcrFfL To find out more about the book: https://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/ FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj/ Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192/ Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond/ TRANSCRIPT Hi there. I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am going to talk about turning your dissertation or thesis into a scholarly journal article. You’ve put a lot of time and effort into your thesis and dissertation. Perhaps you can repurpose some of this material. Maybe as a journal article? Obviously, a thesis or dissertation is innately different from a journal article. But the information contained in it may have interest to academia. In my last video, I discussed turning your dissertation into a book or monograph. I will link to that video at the end of this one. Here are some points to think about when considering the journal article option. Leave some time between the completion of your thesis before considering its potential application as an article. Some distance will give you perspective on how best to alter the work. Accept the fact that changes will need to be made. You will not be able to cut a section from a dissertation and submit it as an article, not even a chapter. The structure of a thesis or dissertation is by nature different from articles. You will need to rewrite or edit the work. Most journals have a Guideline for Authors that lays out the exact specifications of articles they will consider. Review them carefully and make you sure you conform to the page length, reference style, maximum number of figures and tables, etc. To consider what to cut and what to change, think through the themes or findings of your dissertation. Does it lend itself more to a series of articles on the main topic or one single article? Map out what you would like to submit and use that as a starting point for your new work: a manuscript for submission to a journal. When looking at changes, consider how articles usually differ from the longer form content that you have created. Long literature review sections are uncommon in articles unless it is a review article. The extensive references are also unlikely to translate as well. Think through the differences between the long form nature of a dissertation or thesis compared to the short, compact, stand-alone nature of an article. Zero in on a journal and their interests and start reworking; or more likely rewriting. Good luck. Well that’s it. I am a publishing consultant and work with associations, publishers, and individuals on a host of content related challenges. Reach out to me at RiverwindsConsulting.com with your questions. Hit the Like button below if you enjoyed this video. Please subscribe to my YouTube channel or click on my video about revising your dissertation into a book or monograph. And make comments below. Thank so much and take care.
Views: 180 John Bond
How to Review a Manuscript
 
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Learn how to write a peer review. This video guides peer reviewers through the process of reviewing a scientific manuscript and writing a peer review. We’re going to walk you through three main elements of peer review: - being invited to review a manuscript - reading the manuscript, and - writing the peer review Read more at the PLOS Reviewer Center (http://reviewers.plos.org) ==When you're invited to review== First, let’s talk about what to do when you’re invited to review a manuscript. When you get an invitation, ask yourself three simple questions to help you decide whether to accept or decline: - Do you have the right expertise to comment on the manuscript? - Do you have enough time to do the review by the deadline? - Can you provide an objective review and are you free of any competing interests? You should only consider accepting the invitation if you can answer yes to all of these questions. ==When you read a manuscript== It’s a good idea to read the whole manuscript first. Then read through it again and focus on specific sections. Take lots of notes as you go and mark down specific sections and page numbers so you can keep track of the points you want to discuss. The first thing you should do is figure out what the manuscript is about. Do the authors identify the main question and key claims? These should be clearly stated in the introduction. The authors should also discuss related research and explain how the study fits into that context. Then look at the figures and tables along with the results. Do the results line up with what’s being shown? Make sure you also pay attention to the methods and study design. Are the methods appropriate? Does the study follow relevant reporting guidelines and meet ethical standards? Then read the conclusions: Are they supported by the data and results? ==When you write the review== When you’re ready to start writing, find out how the review needs to be formatted and submitted. Some journals might have a structured form with specific questions to respond to. You should also find out if you will need to recommend a decision, like minor or major revision. This information might be in your invitation letter, in the reviewer guidelines, or in the online system. Follow an outline to keep your comments organized and easy to read. Think about it like an upside-down triangle, with the key message at the top followed by evidence and examples, then additional details at the very bottom. Start off by summarizing the research in your own words and stating your overall impression. Then use the middle section to provide detail on what the authors need to do to improve the manuscript. Divide this section into major issues and minor issues. - Major issues are the essential things the authors must address before the manuscript is considered further. Make sure you focus on what is fundamental for the current study. In other words, it’s not helpful to recommend additional work that would be considered the “next step” in the study. - Minor issues are still important but are smaller in scope and don’t affect the overall conclusions. Use this section to mention things like including additional references, clarifying the language, or adding more context. Finally, add any confidential comments to share privately with the journal editors. This is where you might state if you have any competing interests. You can also raise concerns about ethics or misconduct, though in these cases it’s a good idea to get in touch with the journal staff directly as well. Follow us on Twitter! https://twitter.com/PLOS ==Credits== "Thinker" Flickr, bobistraveling Moby - "Sunspot" - www.mobygratis.com Adam Vitovsky - "The Stratosphere" - www.adamvitovsky.com
Views: 10753 PLOS Media
How to Read a Paper Efficiently (By Prof. Pete Carr)
 
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In this video, Prof. Pete Carr (faculty member at the University of Minnesota, Department of Chemistry) shares an algorithm to read a scientific paper more efficiently. One might start reading the paper in the order in which it is written, for example, title, abstract, introduction, etc., however, there is a more efficient method to extract the most information from the article, in the least amount of time.
How to Read a Scholarly Journal Article
 
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A tutorial to illustrate a three-pass technique for reading a peer reviewed article. These tips will help increase your comprehension and to save you some time. This tutorial was developed for the introductory biology course 1050, the Biology of Plants and Animals in Managed Ecosystems. The article Reynolds et al. 2013. Athletic field paint color differentially alters light spectral quality and Bermudagrass photosynthesis. Crop Sci. 53:2209-2217. was used to illustrate the technique.
Views: 8839 PlantAgriculture
research critique
 
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Views: 58341 TheNursing4all
How to Publish a Journal Article - Part One
 
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Dr Lucinda Becker at the University of Reading provides a practical two-part video presentation on how to get your journal article published
Views: 24154 SAGE
How to Read a Journal Article
 
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How to Read a Scholarly Journal Article. This short video by John Bond of Riverwinds Consulting gives tips and techniques to skim and read a journal article. JOHN'S NEW BOOK is “You Can Write and Publish a Book, Second Edition” Buy it at Amazon: https://amzn.to/2PcrFfL To find out more about the book: https://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/ FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj/ Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192/ Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond/ TRANSCRIPT Hi there. I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am going to talk about how to read a journal article. Scholarly articles are different than many other forms of communication. Many times, people are reading articles with a purpose, such as to find out if there is new information or findings about a topic of interest to them. Readers may skim new articles or articles they found through a search, to see if it is worth investing the time in reading the entire article. Here are some tips to optimize your time reading an article for maximum affect. First, know why you are considering an article. Do you want to see if it supports your thesis or research? Are you trying to see if it is the current thinking? Are there new findings on your area of focus? Second, note the keywords for the article to ensure it is on a topic that directly relates to your work. Third, closely read the abstract (which summarizes the entire article including the findings). Use this a go/no go indicator of whether you should read the entire article. Fourth, review the tables and figures in the article, including the captions. Many times, these items are some of the most value pieces of content in the article. They will help you focus on the essence of the content and the key takeaways. Fifth, review the references. What sources is the article built on? Are they current? Can you spot whether classic references for this area are cited or not? This may help get a feel for the author thoroughness. Sixth, take notes about what information you are gathering, including a bibliographic citation of every article. It is very important when you are gathering information to note all your sources. My diligent in avoiding any possibility of a charge of plagiarism Using this technique to skim or scan article is part of scholarly research and evaluation. When you find an article that is important, nothing replaces reading it from beginning to end; maybe twice. Well that’s it. I am a publishing consultant and work with associations, publishers, and individuals on a host of content related challenges. Reach out to me at RiverwindsConsulting.com with your questions. This is my 100th video! I appreciate your support and thank you to all my viewers. Hit the Like button below if you enjoyed this video. Please subscribe to my YouTube channel or click on mt playlist of other videos about scholarly publishing. And make comments below. Thank so much and take care.
Views: 114 John Bond
Should I Publish in an Open Access Journal?
 
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SHOULD I PUBLISH IN AN OPEN ACCESS JOURNAL? Deciding whether to publish in an Open Access journal or a traditional, subscription journal is an important one. This video details what points to consider when making this decision, in regard to scholarly publishing. MORE VIDEOS on deciding about publishing in an Open Access journal: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLqkE49N6nq3jGxJAKviOyWjC4WuQc91Tu FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192 Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond BOOKS by John Bond: The Story of You: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/the-story-of-you/about-the-book/ You Can Write and Publish a Book: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/you-can-write-and-publish-a-book/about-the-book/ TRANSCRIPT: Hi there, I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am going to be discussing if you should publish in an Open Access journal? For many authors or researchers, the first step in the publication process is deciding whether to publish in an Open Access journal or in a traditional subscription or closed publication. The idea is that Open Access will deliver more downloads, more readers, and therefore a wider exposure to their work. On the flip side, many Open Access journal charge a fee. Many are newer publications and may not have the cache of the some older, more established subscription or society publications have. As a reminder, Open Access means there are no barriers to accessing or reading the articles in a journal such as needing a subscription. There are also limited or no copyright restrictions to the articles. There are several models for Open Access or OA. Gold OA is the most common one. Under Gold OA, the journal may have various business models. One might be to charge an APC or Author Processing Charge which could range from several hundred dollars to several thousand dollars. FYI according to the Directory of Open Access Journals 60% of all OA journals don’t charge an APC fee to the author. Check out DOAJ.org which calls itself, “s a community-curated list of open access journals and aims to be the starting point for all information searches for quality, peer reviewed open access material.” Another model is Green OA. Under this model the author self-archives their article at a publicly available repository run by someone such as at a university. So, in deciding whether to go Open Access there are five decision points: First, is the journal an established and legitimate journal. Jeffrey Beall, a librarian from Colorado, has done a great work in identifying predatory publishers that accept basically all articles and do no peer review or work on the manuscript. They just charge an APC and post your material. Check if the journal you are considering is on his list of predatory publications. A link to this list is posted at the end of this video. To confirm the journal conforms to accepted practices you can also check the DOAJ site to see there are listed there, although some legitimate ones may not be on this voluntary list. Second, confirm the publication is peer reviewed. Peer review is the bed rock of quality research. Third, what metrics are used to measure the articles or publication against their peers. Does the journal have an Impact Factor? An H Index? Altmetrics or alternative metrics for its social media engagements or shares. If it has these or other metrics, how do the compare to other journals in their field? Fourth, check where the journal is indexed. Is it in Google Scholar, Medline, CINAHL, or whatever index applies to your individual field? The most important thing for the journal is exposure and indexing directly helps with that exposure. Finally, reputation is key. Ask your colleagues about any publication in your particular field and how it is perceived. Many Open Access are high quality publications ones and are leaders in their field. Whether to pay an APC, if they charge one, may be a deciding factor. At the end of the day, the reputation of the journal and how widely it is distributed or available to readers are the key decision points. These two factors are important and that is the decision point as whether to publish in Open Access or not. Well that’s it. Click here to subscribe to my YouTube channel or to see the playlist as to dealing with the decision point as to publishing in Open Access or not or leave me a comment below or send me an email. Thanks a lot and take care.
Views: 5287 John Bond
What is a Scholarly Journal Article?
 
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Someday soon, you'll need to find a scholarly journal article for a project or research paper. Awesome. No problem. But, wait a second, what is a "scholarly journal article?" How is it different from a popular source like a newspaper or magazine article? Good question! Let's break down the differences. Scholarly journals enable scholars -- experts in a particular academic field -- to communicate their research with other experts by publishing articles and to stay current by reading about other scholars' work. Consequently, scholarly journals create a community of experts who are all participating in a kind of "conversation" in that academic field. Rather than a face-to-face conversation, this is a formal conversation, which takes place over months and years through these scholarly articles. The most important part of this long term written conversation - what makes it a "scholarly" conversation - is what's called the "peer review process." The peer review process works like this: in order for a scholar to get published in a scholarly journal, his or her expert peers must first read their work and critique it. These "peer reviewers" make sure the scholar has made valid arguments, and that he or she has cited appropriate experts in the field to support the argument. This is why you may hear scholarly articles referred to as peer-reviewed articles. These terms are often used interchangeably. This rigorous evaluation process ensures scholarly work meets a higher standard than popular publications and allows other scholars to rely on these articles for their own research. So, why is this important for you? First, the information in a scholarly text has been carefully evaluated, so it is more reliable and credible than information in popular sources. Second, reading scholarly journal articles for your projects can give you insight into professional argumentation and research practices. Finally, every scholarly text has extensive bibliographies that introduce you to important texts in the field, which can help you extend your research in that area. When you read the articles and books the scholar cited in his or her article, you are taking part in the scholarly conversation -- and getting leads additional sources! Okay, so where are these scholarly articles hiding? Let's say you're in a research database and you only want scholarly articles. How do you do it? In EBSCO's Academic Search Complete, you check the box for "Scholarly (Peer Reviewed) Journals" before clicking the search button. This limits the search results to material found in peer-reviewed publications. Note that some material in these publications, such as book reviews and editorials, may not be peer-reviewed. To make sure, click the article title and check that the document type is an "article" or "journal article." Other research databases have similar interfaces. For more information, please, Ask Us.
How Do I Find Journal Articles?
 
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This brief video explains how to find journal articles. Part of the InfoRhode Tutorial Series: http://www.uri.edu/library/inforhode
Views: 4467 URILibraries