Home
Search results “Property rights regimes and natural resources a conceptual analysis”
Natural resource management | Wikipedia audio article
 
22:15
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Natural resource management Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Natural resource management refers to the management of natural resources such as land, water, soil, plants and animals, with a particular focus on how management affects the quality of life for both present and future generations (stewardship). Natural resource management deals with managing the way in which people and natural landscapes interact. It brings together land use planning, water management, biodiversity conservation, and the future sustainability of industries like agriculture, mining, tourism, fisheries and forestry. It recognises that people and their livelihoods rely on the health and productivity of our landscapes, and their actions as stewards of the land play a critical role in maintaining this health and productivity.Natural resource management specifically focuses on a scientific and technical understanding of resources and ecology and the life-supporting capacity of those resources. Environmental management is also similar to natural resource management. In academic contexts, the sociology of natural resources is closely related to, but distinct from, natural resource management.
Views: 7 wikipedia tts
Dr. Jordan Peterson | The Nexus Of Postmodernism And Marxism
 
02:31:52
The UBC Free Speech Club had the honour of hosting Dr. Jordan B. Peterson on November 3rd, 2017. Link to Dr. Peterson's original upload: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PfH8IG7Awk0&t=2830s RELEVANT LINKS FOR DR. PETERSON: Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/jordanbpeterson Self Authoring: http://selfauthoring.com/ Understand Myself: http://understandmyself.com/ Jordan Peterson Website: http://jordanbpeterson.com/ Podcast: http://jordanbpeterson.com/jordan-b-p... Reading List: http://jordanbpeterson.com/2017/03/gr... Twitter: https://twitter.com/jordanbpeterson Website: http://jordanbpeterson.com/ The UBC Free Speech Club is nonpartisan and committed to cultivating an open dialogue on campus, where arguments are made with wit and reason rather than rhetoric and personal attack. We cherish a diversity of opinions and seek to promote an open debate stage, where political correctness no longer holds sway. Beyond just this, we are dedicated to our national brand, and are committed to opening chapters all over Canada under the Free Speech Club of Canada. RELEVANT FSC LINKS: PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/FreeSpeechClub FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/UBCFreeSpeec... WEBSITE: https://www.freespeechclub.com TWITTER: https://twitter.com/TheFSClub?lang=en
Views: 87240 The Free Speech Club
Senior Loeb Scholar Lecture: Bruno Latour, “A Tale of Seven Planets – An Exercise in Gaiapolitics”
 
01:24:43
Until recently the expression ‘we don't live in the same planet' was a metaphorical way of expressing no more than a disagreement. Today it has taken a literal meaning that the lecture will pursue in trying to map contrasted definitions of what used to be called “the natural world”. Bruno Latour is now emeritus professor associated with the médialab and the program in political arts (SPEAP) of Sciences Po Paris. Since January 2018 he is for two years fellow at the Zentrum fur Media Kunst (ZKM) and professor at the HfG both in Karlsruhe. Member of several academies and recipient of six honorary doctorate, he is the recipient in 2013 of the Holberg Prize. He has written and edited more than twenty books and published more than one hundred and fifty articles. You can find more informations on his website (http://www.bruno-latour.fr/).
Views: 3417 Harvard GSD
'Derivatives Deconstructed' with Professor Dan Awrey
 
01:32:00
Delivered as part of the Business Law Workshop series at the Oxford Law Faculty.
Views: 864 Oxford Law Faculty
Across Oceans of Law
 
01:18:24
The Center for Race & Gender Spring 2019 Distinguished Guest Lecture presents Across Oceans of Law Renisa Mawani Professor of Sociology, University of British Columbia
Views: 196 UC Berkeley Events
Thomas Piketty visits HLS to debate his book 'Capital in the Twenty-First Century'
 
02:02:59
On Friday March 6 at Harvard Law School, renowned economist Thomas Piketty, professor of Economics, EHESS and at the Paris School of Economics, visited the law school to debate his bestselling book Capital in the Twenty-First Century with several Harvard faculty, including: Sven Beckert Laird Bell Professor of American History, Harvard University; Christine Desan, Leo Gottlieb Professor of Law, Harvard Law School; David Kennedy, Manley O. Hudson Professor of Law, Harvard Law School; and Stephen Marglin, Walter S. Barker Chair in the Department of Economics, Harvard University.
Views: 20417 Harvard Law School
PRC Forum: James Buchanan (U1026) - Full Video
 
58:50
James Buchanan, Professor Economics, George Mason University, 1986 Nobel Laureate in Economics, discusses political and constitutional rules within which politicians operate and summarizes his analysis of incentives faced by politicians and bureaucrats. He wants emphasis on long term consequences of actions and would like to see the Constitution amended to balance the budget. Check out our Facebook page here: www.facebook.com/FreeToChooseNetwork Visit our media website to find other programs here: http://freetochoosemedia.org/index.php Connect with us on Twitter here: https://twitter.com/FreeToChooseNet Learn more about our company here: http://freetochoosenetwork.org Shop for related products here: http://www.freetochoose.net Stream from FreeToChoose.TV here: http://freetochoose.tv
Seminar 9: Surya Ganguli - Statistical Physics of Deep Learning
 
01:03:42
MIT RES.9-003 Brains, Minds and Machines Summer Course, Summer 2015 View the complete course: https://ocw.mit.edu/RES-9-003SU15 Instructor: Surya Ganguli Describes how the application of methods from statistical physics to the analysis of high-dimensional data can provide theoretical insights into how deep neural networks can learn to perform functions such as object categorization. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA More information at https://ocw.mit.edu/terms More courses at https://ocw.mit.edu
Views: 1102 MIT OpenCourseWare
Epstein Conference - Panel 3: Intellectual Property
 
01:33:00
"Panel 3: Intellectual Property: Patents, Copyrights, Trademarks, Trade Secrets, Misappropriation" In April 2018, the University of Chicago Law School and New York University School of Law co-sponsored a conference in honor of the fifty-year academic career and scholarship of Richard A. Epstein.
13. Commodity Models
 
01:20:45
MIT 18.S096 Topics in Mathematics with Applications in Finance, Fall 2013 View the complete course: http://ocw.mit.edu/18-S096F13 Instructor: Alexander Eydeland This is a guest lecture on commodity modeling, analyzing the methods of generating profit with a constrained system. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms More courses at http://ocw.mit.edu
Views: 15515 MIT OpenCourseWare
1. Introduction to Superposition
 
01:16:07
MIT 8.04 Quantum Physics I, Spring 2013 View the complete course: http://ocw.mit.edu/8-04S13 Instructor: Allan Adams In this lecture, Prof. Adams discusses a series of thought experiments involving "box apparatus" to illustrate the concepts of uncertainty and superposition, which are central to quantum mechanics. The first ten minutes are devoted to course information. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms More courses at http://ocw.mit.edu
Views: 1446703 MIT OpenCourseWare
Tragedy of the commons | Wikipedia audio article
 
36:05
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Tragedy of the commons Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The tragedy of the commons is a term used in social science to describe a situation in a shared-resource system where individual users acting independently according to their own self-interest behave contrary to the common good of all users by depleting or spoiling that resource through their collective action. The concept and phrase originated in an essay written in 1833 by the British economist William Forster Lloyd, who used a hypothetical example of the effects of unregulated grazing on common land (also known as a "common") in the British Isles. The concept became widely known over a century later due to an article written by the American ecologist and philosopher Garrett Hardin in 1968. In this modern economic context, commons is taken to mean any shared and unregulated resource such as atmosphere, oceans, rivers, fish stocks, or even an office refrigerator. It has been argued that the very term 'tragedy of the Commons' is a misnomer, since 'the commons' referred to land resources with rights jointly owned by members of a community, and no individual outside the community had any access to the resource. However, the term is now used in social science and economics when describing a problem where all individuals have equal and open access to a resource. Hence, 'tragedy of open access regimes' or simply 'the open access problem' are more apt terms.The 'tragedy of the commons' is often cited in connection with sustainable development, meshing economic growth and environmental protection, as well as in the debate over global warming. It has also been used in analyzing behavior in the fields of economics, evolutionary psychology, anthropology, game theory, politics, taxation and sociology. Although common resource systems have been known to collapse due to overuse (such as in over-fishing), many examples have existed and still do exist where members of a community with access to a common resource co-operate or regulate to exploit those resources prudently without collapse. Elinor Ostrom was awarded the Nobel Prize in economics for demonstrating exactly this concept in her book Governing the Commons, which included examples of how local communities were able to do this without top-down regulations.
Views: 19 wikipedia tts
Jordan Peterson & Slavoj Žižek - Happiness: Capitalism Vs. Marxism - HQ Video & Audio + English CC
 
02:38:09
Debate: Happiness: Capitalism Vs. Marxism - with Transcribed English Closed Captions (CC) Dr. Jordan Peterson & Slavoj Žižek (Subtitles/Captions in English) Original extracted from https://www.jordanvsslavojdebate.com (livestream.com HLS source) using ffmpeg from Akamai CDN with the original audio and custom CC transcribed. High Quality Video & Audio Version Friday, April 19th at the Sony Centre in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, Jordan Peterson debates Slavoj Zizek, Slovenian philosopher and professor at the Institute for Sociology and Philosophy at the University of Ljubljana, whose works on cultural studies, psychoanalysis and, above all, Marxism, are world-renowned. 1:45 Welcome Slavoj Zizek and Jordan Peterson 7:51 Peterson's Opening Statement 38:55 Zizek's Opening Statement 1:13:19 Peterson's Response 1:25:32 Zizek's Response 1:38:53 Ending Questions
Views: 3449 Karol S
An American Utopia: Fredric Jameson in Conversation with Stanley Aronowitz
 
01:44:41
Eminent literary and political theorist Fredric Jameson, of Duke University, gives a new address, followed by a conversation with noted cultural critic Stanely Aronowitz, of the Graduate Center. Jameson, author of Postmodernism: The Cultural Logic of Late Capitalism and The Political Unconscious, will consider the practicality of the Utopian tradition and its broader implications for cultural production and political institutions. Co-sponsored by the Writers' Institute and the Ph.D. Program in Comparative Literature.
The Sociology of Race and Organizations
 
01:03:31
This event brings together three scholars working at the intersection of the sociology of race and the sociology of organizations to discuss how organizations “do” race and their role in producing or contesting racial inequality. The panelists will discuss how to conceptualize organizations as “racialized,” and how these forces shape everything from college student protests to prisoner re-entry. Speakers: 00:10 Daniel Hirschman, Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, Brown University. 17:57 Lucius Couloute, Ph.D. candidate, University of Massachusetts Amherst. 35:00 Ellen Berrey, Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto and an affiliated scholar of the American Bar Foundation. A CSREA Faculty Grant Event. Co-sponsored by the Taubman Center for American Politics and Policy. https://www.brown.edu/academics/race-ethnicity/events/panel-discussion-%E2%80%9Cinstitutional-racism-sociology-race-and-organizations%E2%80%9D Thursday, April 18, 2019 Brown University
Views: 142 Brown University
Capital in the Twenty-First Century
 
01:30:03
The French economist Thomas Piketty (Paris School of Economics) discussed his new book, Capital in the Twenty-First Century at the Graduate Center. In this landmark work, Piketty argues that the main driver of inequality—the tendency of returns on capital to exceed the rate of economic growth—threatens to generate extreme inequalities that stir discontent and undermine democratic values. He calls for political action and policy intervention. Joseph Stiglitz (Columbia University), Paul Krugman (Princeton University), and Steven Durlauf (University of Wisconsin--Madison) participated in a panel moderated by LIS Senior Scholar Branko Milanovic. The event was introduced by LIS Director Janet Gornick, professor of political science and sociology at the Graduate Center. Cosponsored by the Luxembourg Income Study Center and the Advanced Research Collaborative.
Political Concepts at Brown: The Science Edition (Video 3)
 
01:47:27
The annual conference of the Political Concepts Initiative was dedicated to analyzing the contemporary conditions of knowledge production, with a focus on the sciences and the university. Speakers reflect on a single, specific concept in their presentations. Sponsored by the Cogut Institute for the Humanities. Alex Csiszar • Peer Review Kaushik Sunder Rajan • Value Moderator: Alka Menon Friday, December 7, 2018 Brown University
Views: 64 Brown University
Kees Christiaanse, “Inversion and Subtraction in Urban Design”
 
01:22:27
The European city is a nucleus in a network of approximately 500 cities with an average population of 50.000-1.000.000 inhabitants and an average distance of 100 km. In-between, there is a cultural landscape which has many qualities despite its dense population. This cultural landscape is pervaded by efficient transport infrastructures. Despite some deficits, this centuries-old constellation has a high quality of life and urbanity compared to most other urban areas on earth. Above all, it is important to optimize this constellation and not just focus on individual compact cities. Today, we are commonly taught that at least 50% of the world's population is living in cities. However, it is forgotten that half of these 50% are likely to live in urbanized landscapes. Also, the majority of the European cities’ population lives on the outskirts of the city and not in the center. The urbanized landscape, for example the entire ‘Rhine banana’, is interesting because it contains a high density of population, urban facilities, industry and logistics, as well as a large proportion of agricultural land: a ‘productive' landscape. This landscape cannot be designed, but only steered. The steering mechanisms consist rather of ‘braking factors’ that protect against over-urbanization than of propulsive building projects.
Views: 984 Harvard GSD
Symposium on Blockchain for Robotic Systems
 
07:48:24
Robotic systems are revolutionizing applications from transportation to health care. However, many of the characteristics that make robots ideal for future applications—such as autonomy, self-learning, and knowledge sharing—also raise concerns about the evolution of the technology. Blockchain, an emerging technology that originated in the digital currency field, shows great potential to make robotic operations more secure, autonomous, flexible, and even profitable, thereby bridging the gap between purely scientific domains and real-world applications. This symposium seeks to move beyond the classical view of robotic systems to advance our understanding about the possibilities and limitations of combining state-of-the art robotic systems with blockchain technology. More information at: https://www.media.mit.edu/events/symposium-on-blockchain-for-robotics/ License: CC-BY-4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/)
Views: 2429 MIT Media Lab
4: News, Politics and the Ownership of Information
 
02:14:22
New news media have been a hot topic in political analysis the past few years. This week we compare current news media’s growing pains to how news platforms and networks also transformed radically in the first centuries of print’s dissemination, especially the human social networks and agencies which strove to disseminate, control, and monetize news. Recorded October 26th, 2018
Behold, America! | Symposium | Part 5
 
34:09
Patricia Kelly, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Critical Studies at the Emily Carr University of Art and Design in Vancouver, Canada Measuring Here and There, or the Decentralization of American Art When influential art critic and curator Lucy Lippard staged 955,000 in Vancouver, BC in January 1970, she was acknowledging the international aspirations and interconnectivity of much American conceptual art. Participating artists such as Robert Smithson, Douglas Huebler, and Sol LeWitt, had, by this time, well established practices concerned with mapping and relationality. Lippard's push towards decentralization signaled a broader desire among contemporary artists and critics to increase opportunities for sustained intellectual and creative inquiry, to understand art practice from a global (rather than regional) perspective, and to expand networks of like-minded artists across national borders in often unexpected and creative ways. Using this exhibition as a point of departure, this paper will explore the circulation of artists between the US and the West Coast of Canada in the late 60s and early 70s, and its potentially destabilizing effect on American art history. Conversation with James Luna & Michael Hatt, Ph.D. Dr. Hatt is Professor in the History of Art at the University of Warwick, England Wang Dang Doodle Encounters, or Representing the Indian, Then and Now James Luna's practice has focused on cross-cultural, multicultural, and current cultural issues in contemporary American Indian society. He will present his most recent installation, which opened last month at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science. Luna will be joined by Michael Hatt to discuss his work in relation to art history, the representation of Native Americans in the past, and the ways in which that history is presented to the public. Deborah Butterfield Deborah Butterfield is a major American sculptor whose subject since the 1970s has been the horse. Butterfield earned an MFA from the University of California, Davis, and is the recipient of numerous awards and fellowships, from such organizations as the National Endowment for the Arts. In this presentation, Butterfield will overview much of her career, from her college works to her current studio practice. Derrick Cartwright, Ph.D. Director of University Galleries and Professor of Practice, Art History at the University of San Diego Proliferating Participation: American Art Displays in Eras of Crisis Contemporary American museum culture is fraught with challenges. In the face of weakening public support, institutions today claim that they seek audience engagement as a key to maintaining relevance and achieving sustainability. This talk explores the ways that "participation" has often been held up as a virtue by American art exhibitions past and present. From Robert Henri's 1915 exhibition of Modern American Painting at the Panama California Exposition to ambitious projects, like Behold, America!, the stakes of encouraging new participatory practices have at once evolved and grown more urgent across the United States. www.TheSanDiegoMuseumofArt.org Video produced by Balboa Park Online Collaborative
Beshara Doumani ─ Family Life in the Ottoman Mediterranean: A Social History
 
01:54:28
Skip ahead to main speaker at 2:04 Introduction by Shahzad Bashir, Aga Khan Professor of Islamic Humanities, Professor of Religious Studies, Brown University Comments by David Sabean,* Henry J. Bruman Professor of German History at the University of California, Los Angeles, and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Cosponsored by the department of History Middle East Studies Director Beshara Doumani introduces his new book, "Family Life in the Ottoman Mediterranean: A Social History." Cambridge University Press, 2017. Abstract: In writings about Islam, women and modernity in the Middle East, family and religion are frequently invoked but rarely historicized. Based on a wide range of local sources spanning two centuries (1660-1860), Beshara Doumani argues that there is no such thing as a typical Muslim or Arab family type that is so central to Orientalist, nationalist, and Islamist political imaginations. Rather, one finds dramatic regional differences, even within the same cultural zone, in the ways that family was understood, organized, and reproduced. In his comparative examination of the property devolution strategies and gender regimes in the context of local political economies, Doumani offers a groundbreaking examination of the stories and priorities of ordinary people and how they shaped the making of the modern Middle East. Beshara Doumani is a professor of history and director of Middle East Studies at Brown University. His research focuses on groups, places, and time periods marginalized by mainstream scholarship on the early modern and modern Middle East. He also writes on the topics of displacement, academic freedom, politics of knowledge production, and the Palestinian condition. His books include Family Life in the Ottoman Mediterranean: A Social History, Rediscovering Palestine: Merchants and Peasants in Jabal Nablus, 1700-1900, Academic Freedom After September 11 (editor), and Family History in the Middle East: Household, Property and Gender (editor). He is the editor of a book series, New Directions in Palestinian Studies, with the University of California Press.
Graph properties of transcription networks
 
01:21:29
MIT 8.591J Systems Biology, Fall 2014 View the complete course: http://ocw.mit.edu/8-591JF14 Instructor: Jeff Gore Prof. Jeff Gore continues the discussion of oscillators, including alternative designs for oscillators. He then discusses the article Emergence of scaling in random networks, by Barabási & Albert. The final topic is network motifs. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms More courses at http://ocw.mit.edu
Views: 2951 MIT OpenCourseWare
2. Existential Security Threats to the United States
 
01:29:58
ISIS is a threat to the United States, but according to President Obama not an existential threat. But what of nuclear warfare, bioterrorism, or climate change? We focus here with William Perry, Amy Zegart, and Admiral Gary Roughhead on the most worrisome threats to the United States and the world – those that threaten our very existence. Election 2016 will attempt, with the help of experts, to make sense of an election that defies all historical precedent and to take stock of the health of American democracy. For more on Election 2016, visit: http://election2016.stanford.edu https://medium.com/@election2016stanford View the entire Election 2016 video series: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLpGHT1n4-mAtpFtBTgI87KkQYjR84ZEqD
Views: 3275 Stanford
UMass Amherst Distinguished Faculty Lecture 2019, Professor Carol E. Heim
 
51:49
Professor Carol E. Heim, Department of Economics at UMass Amherst, presented a lecture on Mrach 27, 2019 titled: "Who Pays, Who Benefits, Who Decides? Property Developers and the Political Economy of Urban Growth." Property developers reap a return sometimes called "development gain," which is over and above the ordinary rate of profit. They often use legal and political means to increase their share of economic value created through urban development. Their interests are sometimes, but not always, in alignment with the public good. Historical research on the boom cities of Chicago and Phoenix, particularly concerning infrastructure finance, illustrates their goals and activities. Examination of current policy issues in cities such as Houston and Miami, which are facing severe impacts of natural disasters and climate change, also provides opportunities to explore the role of developers in U.S. cities and suburbs. UMass Amherst, the flagship campus of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, is the largest public research university in New England, distinguished by the excellence and breadth of its academic, research and community programs. Founded in 1863 and home to nearly 30,000 total undergraduate and graduate students, UMass ranks no. 27 in a field of more than 700 public, four-year colleges across the nation, according to the U.S. News & World Report's latest annual college guide. UMass Amherst stretches across more than 1,400 acres of land in the historic Pioneer Valley of Western Massachusetts, providing a rich cultural environment in a rural setting close to major urban centers - campus sits 90 miles from Boston and 175 miles from New York City. The idyllic college town of Amherst is home to hiking, biking, museums, music, theater, history, food, farms and much more. UMass Amherst also joins a local consortium of five nationally recognized colleges, including Amherst, Hampshire, Mount Holyoke and Smith colleges. For more information on UMass Amherst, visit: https://umass.edu
Views: 50 UMass
Ecology | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:20:37
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Ecology Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Ecology (from Greek: οἶκος, "house", or "environment"; -λογία, "study of") is the branch of biology which studies the interactions among organisms and their environment. Objects of study include interactions of organisms with each other and with abiotic components of their environment. Topics of interest include the biodiversity, distribution, biomass, and populations of organisms, as well as cooperation and competition within and between species. Ecosystems are dynamically interacting systems of organisms, the communities they make up, and the non-living components of their environment. Ecosystem processes, such as primary production, pedogenesis, nutrient cycling, and niche construction, regulate the flux of energy and matter through an environment. These processes are sustained by organisms with specific life history traits. Biodiversity means the varieties of species, genes, and ecosystems, enhances certain ecosystem services. Ecology is not synonymous with environmentalism, natural history, or environmental science. It overlaps with the closely related sciences of evolutionary biology, genetics, and ethology. An important focus for ecologists is to improve the understanding of how biodiversity affects ecological function. Ecologists seek to explain: Life processes, interactions, and adaptations The movement of materials and energy through living communities The successional development of ecosystems The abundance and distribution of organisms and biodiversity in the context of the environment.Ecology has practical applications in conservation biology, wetland management, natural resource management (agroecology, agriculture, forestry, agroforestry, fisheries), city planning (urban ecology), community health, economics, basic and applied science, and human social interaction (human ecology). For example, the Circles of Sustainability approach treats ecology as more than the environment 'out there'. It is not treated as separate from humans. Organisms (including humans) and resources compose ecosystems which, in turn, maintain biophysical feedback mechanisms that moderate processes acting on living (biotic) and non-living (abiotic) components of the planet. Ecosystems sustain life-supporting functions and produce natural capital like biomass production (food, fuel, fiber, and medicine), the regulation of climate, global biogeochemical cycles, water filtration, soil formation, erosion control, flood protection, and many other natural features of scientific, historical, economic, or intrinsic value. The word "ecology" ("Ökologie") was coined in 1866 by the German scientist Ernst Haeckel. Ecological thought is derivative of established currents in philosophy, particularly from ethics and politics. Ancient Greek philosophers such as Hippocrates and Aristotle laid the foundations of ecology in their studies on natural history. Modern ecology became a much more rigorous science in the late 19th century. Evolutionary concepts relating to adaptation and natural selection became the cornerstones of modern ecological theory.
Views: 31 Subhajit Sahu
Development-Induced Displacement
 
02:40:23
Skip ahead to main speaker at 5:48 Bharat Patankar is a leading activist of the left wing Shramik Mukti Dal and of the peasant movement in Maharashtra province, India. He is an activist intellectual who has worked for almost 40 years in movements of workers, farmers, dam evictees, agricultural labourers, the drought eradication movement, alternative cultural movement, women’s liberation movement, anti-SEZ and coal-based power plant movement based on alternative energy proposals, rights of farmers on windmills, and radical anti-caste movements. He is one of the architects of equitable water distribution movement in Maharashtra province. His numerous books and articles include 20 English articles and books, including “Characteristics of Contemporary Caste System and its Annihilation,” in Two Essays on Caste, (University of Mumbai). Michael Levien is an assistant professor in the Department of Sociology at John Hopkins University. His research and teaching interests fall in the fields of development sociology, political sociology, agrarian political economy, and social theory. He has had a long-standing intellectual and political engagement with the phenomenon of rural land dispossession for “development projects” such as dams and now Special Economic Zones (SEZs). His work can be found in The Land Question in India: State, Dispossession and Capitalist Transition (Oxford University Press) and Governing Global Land Deals: The Role of the State in the Rush for Land (Wiley-Blackwell). Sarah Besky, discussant, is an assistant professor of anthropology and international and public affairs at Brown University. She is a cultural anthropologist with research interests in the environment, capitalism, and labor. Her book, The Darjeeling Distinction: Labor and Justice on Fair-Trade Tea Plantations in India (University of California Press) explores how legacies of colonialism intersect with contemporary market reforms to reconfigure notions of value—of labor, of place, and of tea itself. Co-sponsored by the Center for Contemporary South Asia, the Institute at Brown for Environment and Society, and Middle East Studies. This series is funded by a generous grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.
Womxn, Queers, Immigrants & Animal Rights
 
35:17
In this talk, we discuss how speciesism relates to patriarchy, heterosexism/cisgenderism, xenophobia and racism, to name a few. We also provide practical tips so that you can start implementing anti-speciesism in your advocacy. Full transcript with links here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1abZTr4wazrJpkyqkxfmY2JxgMPayIOz-bh2-MuULxKw/edit?usp=sharing ------- Talk originally done at Montclair University for Femvolution, student club.
Views: 202 Collectively Free
Feminist political ecology | Wikipedia audio article
 
09:11
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Feminist political ecology Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Feminist political ecology is a feminist perspective on political ecology, drawing on theories from post-structuralism, feminist geography, and cultural ecology. Feminist political ecology examines the place of gender in the political ecological landscape, exploring gender as a factor in ecological and political relations. Specific areas in which feminist political ecology is focused are development, landscape, resource use, agrarian reconstruction and rural-urban transformation (Hovorka 2006: 209). Feminist political ecologists suggest gender is a crucial variable – in relation to class, race and other relevant dimensions of political ecological life – in constituting access to, control over, and knowledge of natural resources.
Views: 23 wikipedia tts
Climate change mitigation | Wikipedia audio article
 
02:07:45
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Climate_change_mitigation 00:03:41 1 Greenhouse gas concentrations and stabilization 00:09:09 2 Energy consumption by power source 00:10:09 3 Methods and means 00:14:07 3.1 Demand side management 00:14:17 3.1.1 Lifestyle and behavior 00:16:50 3.1.1.1 Dietary change 00:18:38 3.1.2 Energy efficiency and conservation 00:21:44 3.1.3 Demand-side switching sources 00:25:09 3.1.4 Demand side grid management 00:27:34 3.2 Alternative energy sources 00:27:44 3.2.1 Renewable energy 00:34:48 3.2.2 Nuclear power 00:48:37 3.2.3 Coal to gas fuel switching 00:52:17 3.2.4 Heat pump 00:54:57 3.2.5 Fossil fuel phase-out: carbon neutral and negative fuels 00:55:32 3.3 Sinks and negative emissions 00:57:26 3.3.1 Reforestation and afforestation 01:00:04 3.3.2 Avoided desertification 01:02:23 3.3.3 Carbon capture and storage 01:04:19 3.3.4 Enhanced weathering 01:05:01 3.4 Geoengineering 01:07:23 3.4.1 Carbon dioxide removal 01:09:14 3.4.2 Solar radiation management 01:09:44 3.5 Non-COsub2/sub greenhouse gases 01:13:31 4 By sector 01:13:41 4.1 Transport 01:15:11 4.2 Urban planning 01:17:50 4.2.1 Building design 01:18:46 4.3 Agriculture 01:19:58 4.4 Societal controls 01:20:08 4.4.1 Population 01:22:10 5 Costs and benefits 01:22:20 5.1 Costs 01:23:08 5.2 Benefits 01:24:33 5.3 Sharing 01:24:43 5.3.1 Distributing emissions abatement costs 01:26:37 5.3.2 Specific proposals 01:27:32 6 Governmental and intergovernmental action 01:29:02 6.1 Kyoto Protocol 01:31:27 6.2 Temperature targets 01:33:29 6.3 Encouraging use changes 01:34:48 6.3.1 Emissions tax 01:35:54 6.3.2 Subsidies 01:40:47 6.3.3 Investment 01:40:57 6.3.4 Carbon emissions trading 01:42:07 6.4 Implementation 01:42:54 6.4.1 Funding 01:43:23 6.4.2 Problems 01:46:18 6.4.3 Occurrence 01:46:50 6.5 Territorial policies 01:48:11 6.5.1 United States 01:50:23 6.5.2 European Union 01:51:25 6.5.3 Developing countries 01:51:34 7 Non-governmental approaches 01:54:35 7.1 Choices in personal actions and business operations 01:55:31 7.1.1 Air travel and shipment 01:58:50 7.2 Business opportunities and risks 01:59:16 7.3 Investor response 02:00:10 7.4 Legal action 02:01:03 7.5 Activism 02:02:24 8 See also 02:03:16 8.1 By country 02:06:05 9 Notes 02:07:08 10 References 02:07:17 11 External links Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.857823901629676 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-B "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Climate change mitigation consists of actions to limit the magnitude or rate of long-term global warming and its related effects. Climate change mitigation generally involves reductions in human (anthropogenic) emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs). Mitigation may also be achieved by increasing the capacity of carbon sinks, e.g., through reforestation. Mitigation policies can substantially reduce the risks associated with human-induced global warming.According to the IPCC's 2014 assessment report, "Mitigation is a public good; climate change is a case of the 'tragedy of the commons'. Effective climate change mitigation will not be achieved if each agent (individual, institution or country) acts independently in its own selfish interest (see International cooperation and Emissions trading), suggesting the need for collective action. Some adaptation actions, on the other hand, have characteristics of a private good as benefits of actions may accrue more directly to the individuals, regions, or countries that undertake them, at least in the short term. Nevertheless, financing such adaptive activities remains an issue, particularly for poor individuals and countries."Examples of mitigation include reducing energy demand by increasing energy efficiency, phasing out fossil fuels by switching to low-carbon energy sources, and removing carbon dioxide from Earth's atmosphere. for example, through improved building insulation. Another approach to climate change mitigation is climate engineering.M ...
Views: 11 wikipedia tts
Dan Kaplan: Urban Alchemies: Repair and Transformation
 
01:27:50
2018 L. Michael Goldsmith Lecture featuring Dan Kaplan "How to build in the city? That's what this talk is about," said Dan Kaplan (B.Arch. '84), who gave the annual L. Michael Goldsmith lecture at AAP NYC in April. Kaplan is a senior partner at FXCollaborative, a leading green building design firm with offices in New York City and Washington, DC. "This year's L. Michael Goldsmith lecture featuring Dan Kaplan was the largest and most successful to date," said Robert (Bob) W. Balder (B.S. URS '89), Gensler Family Sesquicentennial Executive Director of AAP NYC. The event was complemented by a gallery installation showcasing FXCollaborative's award-winning projects. In his talk titled "Urban Alchemies: Repair and Transformation," Kaplan used the examples in the gallery installation to set out three concepts to approaching urban design. First, the centuries-old method of fixing broken pottery known as Kintsugi, in which lacquer dusted with gold is applied to aged or broken ceramic to accentuate surface cracks, was used to provide a visual metaphor for the city. Next, Kaplan discussed contextual urbanism, where building design should relate to the adjacent context and extend into the future by incorporating sustainability, solar, temperature, humidity, and landscape. Collaboration, the third concept, is rooted in FXCollaborative's philosophy. Formerly FXFowle, the firm rebranded itself in early 2018 to represent a design culture and philosophy reflected in the way its projects are achieved for their clients and the broader community. The annual Goldsmith lecture was established in memory of L. Michael Goldsmith by his family and friends in recognition of his passion for his education at Cornell, his career, and love of the profession of architecture. https://aap.cornell.edu/news-events/kaplan-advocates-urban-alchemy-annual-goldsmith-lecture
Views: 159 CornellAAP
Ecological science | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:42:08
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ecology 00:04:11 1 Levels, scope, and scale of organization 00:06:41 1.1 Hierarchy 00:08:17 1.2 Biodiversity 00:10:08 1.3 Habitat 00:12:06 1.4 Niche 00:15:05 1.5 Niche construction 00:17:44 1.6 Biome 00:19:09 1.7 Biosphere 00:20:32 1.8 Population ecology 00:24:39 1.9 Metapopulations and migration 00:28:08 1.10 Community ecology 00:28:58 1.11 Ecosystem ecology 00:31:04 1.12 Food webs 00:33:38 1.13 Trophic levels 00:36:56 1.14 Keystone species 00:38:48 2 Ecological complexity 00:41:19 2.1 Holism 00:43:21 3 Relation to evolution 00:45:16 3.1 Behavioural ecology 00:48:32 3.2 Cognitive ecology 00:49:56 3.3 Social ecology 00:51:27 3.4 Coevolution 00:54:13 3.5 Biogeography 00:56:20 3.5.1 r/K selection theory 00:58:51 3.6 Molecular ecology 01:00:59 4 Human ecology 01:03:56 4.1 Restoration and management 01:05:15 5 Relation to the environment 01:07:54 5.1 Disturbance and resilience 01:09:06 5.2 Metabolism and the early atmosphere 01:11:30 5.3 Radiation: heat, temperature and light 01:13:49 5.4 Physical environments 01:13:58 5.4.1 Water 01:16:25 5.4.2 Gravity 01:17:59 5.4.3 Pressure 01:19:23 5.4.4 Wind and turbulence 01:21:22 5.4.5 Fire 01:23:28 5.4.6 Soils 01:25:53 5.4.7 Biogeochemistry and climate 01:30:27 6 History 01:30:35 6.1 Early beginnings 01:36:03 6.2 Since 1900 01:41:52 7 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7860656756829514 Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-A "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Ecology (from Greek: οἶκος, "house", or "environment"; -λογία, "study of") is the branch of biology which studies the interactions among organisms and their environment. Objects of study include interactions of organisms that include biotic and abiotic components of their environment. Topics of interest include the biodiversity, distribution, biomass, and populations of organisms, as well as cooperation and competition within and between species. Ecosystems are dynamically interacting systems of organisms, the communities they make up, and the non-living components of their environment. Ecosystem processes, such as primary production, pedogenesis, nutrient cycling, and niche construction, regulate the flux of energy and matter through an environment. These processes are sustained by organisms with specific life history traits. Biodiversity means the varieties of species, genes, and ecosystems, enhances certain ecosystem services. Ecology is not synonymous with environmentalism, natural history, or environmental science. It overlaps with the closely related sciences of evolutionary biology, genetics, and ethology. An important focus for ecologists is to improve the understanding of how biodiversity affects ecological function. Ecologists seek to explain: Life processes, interactions, and adaptations The movement of materials and energy through living communities The successional development of ecosystems The abundance and distribution of organisms and biodiversity in the context of the environment.Ecology has practical applications in conservation biology, wetland management, natural resource management (agroecology, agriculture, forestry, agroforestry, fisheries), city planning (urban ecology), community health, economics, basic and applied science, and human social interaction (human ecology). For example, the Circles of Sustainability approach treats ecology as more than the environment 'out there'. It is not treated as separate from humans. Organisms (including humans) and resources compose ecosystems which, in turn, maintain biophysical feedback mechanisms that moderate processes acting on living (biotic) and non-living (abiotic) components of the planet. Ecosystems sustain life-supporting functions and produce natural capital like biomass production (food, fuel, fiber, and medicine), the regulation of climate, global biogeochemical cycles, water filtration, soil formation, erosion control, fl ...
Views: 2 wikipedia tts
Anarchism | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:24:21
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Anarchism Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Anarchism is a political philosophy that advocates self-governed societies based on voluntary institutions. These are often described as stateless societies, although several authors have defined them more specifically as institutions based on non-hierarchical or free associations. Anarchism holds the state to be undesirable, unnecessary and harmful.While opposition to the state is central, anarchism specifically entails opposing authority or hierarchical organisation in the conduct of all human relations. Anarchism is usually considered a far-left ideology and much of anarchist economics and anarchist legal philosophy reflects anti-authoritarian interpretations of communism, collectivism, syndicalism, mutualism, or participatory economics.Anarchism does not offer a fixed body of doctrine from a single particular world view, instead fluxing and flowing as a philosophy. Many types and traditions of anarchism exist, not all of which are mutually exclusive. Anarchist schools of thought can differ fundamentally, supporting anything from extreme individualism to complete collectivism. Strains of anarchism have often been divided into the categories of social and individualist anarchism or similar dual classifications.
Views: 32 wikipedia tts
Ecology | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:21:22
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Ecology 00:03:18 1 Levels, scope, and scale of organization 00:05:14 1.1 Hierarchy 00:06:32 1.2 Biodiversity 00:07:58 1.3 Habitat 00:09:34 1.4 Niche 00:11:57 1.5 Niche construction 00:14:00 1.6 Biome 00:15:07 1.7 Biosphere 00:16:12 1.8 Population ecology 00:19:32 1.9 Metapopulations and migration 00:22:12 1.10 Community ecology 00:22:52 1.11 Ecosystem ecology 00:24:33 1.12 Food webs 00:26:35 1.13 Trophic levels 00:29:09 1.14 Keystone species 00:30:37 2 Ecological complexity 00:32:39 2.1 Holism 00:34:15 3 Relation to evolution 00:35:45 3.1 Behavioural ecology 00:38:22 3.2 Cognitive ecology 00:39:34 3.3 Social ecology 00:40:45 3.4 Coevolution 00:42:54 3.5 Biogeography 00:44:32 3.5.1 r/K selection theory 00:46:33 3.6 Molecular ecology 00:48:17 4 Human ecology 00:50:41 4.1 Restoration and management 00:51:44 5 Relation to the environment 00:53:47 5.1 Disturbance and resilience 00:54:46 5.2 Metabolism and the early atmosphere 00:56:40 5.3 Radiation: heat, temperature and light 00:58:27 5.4 Physical environments 00:58:36 5.4.1 Water 01:00:33 5.4.2 Gravity 01:01:48 5.4.3 Pressure 01:02:55 5.4.4 Wind and turbulence 01:04:29 5.4.5 Fire 01:06:09 5.4.6 Soils 01:08:04 5.4.7 Biogeochemistry and climate 01:11:43 6 History 01:11:52 6.1 Early beginnings 01:16:32 6.2 Since 1900 01:21:07 7 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Ecology (from Greek: οἶκος, "house", or "environment"; -λογία, "study of") is the branch of biology which studies the interactions among organisms and their environment. Objects of study include interactions of organisms with each other and with abiotic components of their environment. Topics of interest include the biodiversity, distribution, biomass, and populations of organisms, as well as cooperation and competition within and between species. Ecosystems are dynamically interacting systems of organisms, the communities they make up, and the non-living components of their environment. Ecosystem processes, such as primary production, pedogenesis, nutrient cycling, and niche construction, regulate the flux of energy and matter through an environment. These processes are sustained by organisms with specific life history traits. Biodiversity means the varieties of species, genes, and ecosystems, enhances certain ecosystem services. Ecology is not synonymous with environmentalism, natural history, or environmental science. It overlaps with the closely related sciences of evolutionary biology, genetics, and ethology. An important focus for ecologists is to improve the understanding of how biodiversity affects ecological function. Ecologists seek to explain: Life processes, interactions, and adaptations The movement of materials and energy through living communities The successional development of ecosystems The abundance and distribution of organisms and biodiversity in the context of the environment.Ecology has practical applications in conservation biology, wetland management, natural resource management (agroecology, agriculture, forestry, agroforestry, fisheries), city planning (urban ecology), community health, economics, basic and applied science, and human social interaction (human ecology). For example, the Circles of Sustainability approach treats ecology as more than the environment 'out there'. It is not treated as separate from humans. Organisms (including humans) and resources compose ecosystems which, in turn, maintain biophysical feedback mechanisms that moderate processes acting on living (biotic) and non-living (abiotic) components of the planet. Ecosystems sustain life-supporting functions and produce natural capital like biomass production (food, fuel, fiber, and medicine), the regulation of climate, global biogeochemical cycles, water filtration, soil formation, erosion control, flood protection, and many other natural features of scientific, historical, economic, or intrinsic value. The word "ecology" ("Ökologie") was coined in 1866 by the German scientist Ernst H ...
Views: 15 wikipedia tts
Capitalism Definition | Definition & Explanation of Capitalism (Audio Book)
 
02:04:32
Capitalism is an economic system based on private ownership of the means of production and their operation for profit. Characteristics central to capitalism include private property, capital accumulation, wage labor, voluntary exchange, a price system, and competitive markets.[4][5] In a capitalist market economy, decision-making and investment is determined by the owners of the factors of production in financial and capital markets, and prices and the distribution of goods are mainly determined by competition in the market. Economists, political economists, and historians have adopted different perspectives in their analyses of capitalism and have recognized various forms of it in practice. These include laissez-faire or free market capitalism, welfare capitalism, and state capitalism. Different forms of capitalism feature varying degrees of free markets, public ownership, obstacles to free competition, and state-sanctioned social policies. The degree of competition in markets, the role of intervention and regulation, and the scope of state ownership vary across different models of capitalism; the extent to which different markets are free, as well as the rules defining private property, are matters of politics and of policy. Most existing capitalist economies are mixed economies, which combine elements of free markets with state intervention, and in some cases, with economic planning. Capitalism has existed under many forms of government, in many different times, places, and cultures. Following the decline of mercantilism, mixed capitalist systems became dominant in the Western world and continue to spread. Etymology: The term capitalist, meaning an owner of capital, appears earlier than the term capitalism. It dates back to the mid-17th century. Capitalist is derived from capital, which evolved from capitale, a late Latin word based on caput, meaning "head" – also the origin of chattel and cattle in the sense of movable property (only much later to refer only to livestock). Capitale emerged in the 12th to 13th centuries in the sense of referring to funds, stock of merchandise, sum of money, or money carrying interest. By 1283 it was used in the sense of the capital assets of a trading firm. It was frequently interchanged with a number of other words – wealth, money, funds, goods, assets, property, and so on. The Hollandische Mercurius uses capitalists in 1633 and 1654 to refer to owners of capital. In French, Étienne Clavier referred to capitalistes in 1788, six years before its first recorded English usage by Arthur Young in his work Travels in France (1792). David Ricardo, in his Principles of Political Economy and Taxation (1817), referred to "the capitalist" many times. Samuel Taylor Coleridge, an English poet, used capitalist in his work Table Talk (1823). Pierre-Joseph Proudhon used the term capitalist in his first work, What is Property? (1840), to refer to the owners of capital. Benjamin Disraeli used the term capitalist in his 1845 work Sybil. ........................................................................................ Sources: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capitalism Background Music: Evgeny Teilor, https://www.jamendo.com/track/1176656/oceans Image Sources: www.pixabay.com www.openclipart.com .........................................................................................................
Views: 708 Free Audio Books
Money as a Democratic Medium | The Public Option and The Narrow Bank (with Slides)
 
01:29:44
Recent work identifies money as a utility or infrastructural service, suggesting the government’s obligation to provide access and to equalize compensation paid to those holding deposits. Innovative proposals for redesign argue that the central bank should provide transactional services directly to individuals or, alternatively, to large depositors.
Views: 203 Harvard Law School
Manifesto against Labour - Crisis Group 1999
 
02:01:05
Workless of the World: UNITE! "A corpse rules society – the corpse of labour. All powers around the globe formed an alliance to defend its rule: the Pope and the World Bank, Tony Blair and Jörg Haider, trade unions and entrepreneurs, German ecologists and French socialists. They don’t know but one slogan: jobs, jobs, jobs!" Manifesto against Labour - Krisis Group (1999) -------------------------------------------------------------------- http://www.krisis.org/1999/manifesto-against-labour -------------------------------------------------------------------- Manifest gegen die Arbeit - Gruppe Krisis (german) english: https://youtu.be/POHENPfWhi8 espaniol: https://youtu.be/HqRA0RHI81Y german: https://youtu.be/9DJIeZtVrGQ -------------------------------------------------------------------- Manifesto against Labour Krisis-Group 1. The rule of dead labour 2. The neo-liberal apartheid society 5:31 3. The neo-welfare-apartheid-state 10:02 4. Exaggeration and denial of the labour religion 17:23 5. Labour is a coercive social principle 22:39 6. Labour and capital are the two sides of the same coin 28:05 7. Labour is patriarchal rule 33:20 8. Labour is the service of humans in bondage 38:49 9. The bloody history of labour 10. The working class movement was a movement for labour 52:16 11. The crisis of labour 58:39 12. The end of politics 1:05:54 13. The casino-capitalist simulation of labour society 14. Labour can not be redefined 1:21:38 15. The crisis of opposing interests 1:29:04 16. The abolition of labour 1:38:33 17. A programme on the abolishment of labour directed against the enthusiasts of labour 1:46:53 18. The struggle against labour is anti-politics 1:56:40 http://www.krisis.org/1999/manifesto-against-labour -------------------------------------------------------------------- further links: http://www.freie-radios.net/49850 , http://audioarchiv.blogsport.de/2012/07/28/robert-kurz-zum-gedaechtnis/ on libribooks https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pDCPClCcDgc -------------------------------------------------------------------- i advise also Bob Black - The abolition of labour https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2DuoI4bQ07M http://www.krisis.org/1985/the-abolition-of-work Workless of the World: UNITE! _______________________________________________________________ original sources and other translations: overview: http://www.krisis.org/2006/manifest-gegen-die-arbeit-uebersicht/ englich: http://www.krisis.org/1999/manifesto-against-labour/ spanish: http://www.krisis.org/1999/manifiesto-contra-el-trabajo/ french: http://www.krisis.org/1999/manifeste-contre-le-travail/ italian: http://www.krisis.org/1999/manifesto-contro-il-lavoro/ portugese: http://www.krisis.org/1999/manifesto-contra-o-trabalho/ russian/ МАНИФЕСТ ПРОТИВ ТРУДА: http://www.krisis.org/1999/manifest-protif-truda/ persian(pdf): http://www.krisis.org/wp-content/data/in-persian-manifesto-against-labour.pdf greek (.pdf): http://www.krisis.org/wp-content/data/manifesto_krisis_griechisch.pdf _______________________________________________________________ http://www.krisis.org/1999/manifest-gegen-die-arbeit/ http://audioarchiv.blogsport.de/ http://www.fsk-hh.org/ --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- #krisis #gruppe #crisis #arbeit #arbeitswahn #lohnarbeit #lohndumping #hartz #Hartz4 #HartzIv #algII #ALG2 #Weise #Alt #Ausbeutung #Job #Jobs #Sinnlosjobs #Labour #abolishon #work #workingpoor #ams #ARGE #Bundesanstalt #Wahnsinn #Behördenirrsinn #trabajo #travail #lavoro #ТРУДА #trabalho
Views: 1041 spidermarcus
Bioecology | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:13:09
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ecology 00:02:59 1 Levels, scope, and scale of organization 00:04:46 1.1 Hierarchy 00:05:56 1.2 Biodiversity 00:07:14 1.3 Habitat 00:08:40 1.4 Niche 00:10:48 1.5 Niche construction 00:12:41 1.6 Biome 00:13:42 1.7 Biosphere 00:14:40 1.8 Population ecology 00:17:40 1.9 Metapopulations and migration 00:20:06 1.10 Community ecology 00:20:42 1.11 Ecosystem ecology 00:22:12 1.12 Food webs 00:24:02 1.13 Trophic levels 00:26:21 1.14 Keystone species 00:27:43 2 Ecological complexity 00:29:31 2.1 Holism 00:30:57 3 Relation to evolution 00:32:20 3.1 Behavioural ecology 00:34:39 3.2 Cognitive ecology 00:35:41 3.3 Social ecology 00:36:46 3.4 Coevolution 00:38:43 3.5 Biogeography 00:40:11 3.5.1 r/K selection theory 00:42:01 3.6 Molecular ecology 00:43:35 4 Human ecology 00:45:44 4.1 Restoration and management 00:46:41 5 Relation to the environment 00:48:33 5.1 Disturbance and resilience 00:49:27 5.2 Metabolism and the early atmosphere 00:51:09 5.3 Radiation: heat, temperature and light 00:52:46 5.4 Physical environments 00:52:54 5.4.1 Water 00:54:41 5.4.2 Gravity 00:55:49 5.4.3 Pressure 00:56:49 5.4.4 Wind and turbulence 00:58:15 5.4.5 Fire 00:59:47 5.4.6 Soils 01:01:29 5.4.7 Biogeochemistry and climate 01:04:46 6 History 01:04:54 6.1 Early beginnings 01:08:45 6.2 Since 1900 01:12:54 7 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9637774102080956 Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-D "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Ecology (from Greek: οἶκος, "house", or "environment"; -λογία, "study of") is the branch of biology which studies the interactions among organisms and their environment. Objects of study include interactions of organisms that include biotic and abiotic components of their environment. Topics of interest include the biodiversity, distribution, biomass, and populations of organisms, as well as cooperation and competition within and between species. Ecosystems are dynamically interacting systems of organisms, the communities they make up, and the non-living components of their environment. Ecosystem processes, such as primary production, pedogenesis, nutrient cycling, and niche construction, regulate the flux of energy and matter through an environment. These processes are sustained by organisms with specific life history traits. Biodiversity means the varieties of species, genes, and ecosystems, enhances certain ecosystem services. Ecology is not synonymous with environmentalism, natural history, or environmental science. It overlaps with the closely related sciences of evolutionary biology, genetics, and ethology. An important focus for ecologists is to improve the understanding of how biodiversity affects ecological function. Ecologists seek to explain: Life processes, interactions, and adaptations The movement of materials and energy through living communities The successional development of ecosystems The abundance and distribution of organisms and biodiversity in the context of the environment.Ecology has practical applications in conservation biology, wetland management, natural resource management (agroecology, agriculture, forestry, agroforestry, fisheries), city planning (urban ecology), community health, economics, basic and applied science, and human social interaction (human ecology). For example, the Circles of Sustainability approach treats ecology as more than the environment 'out there'. It is not treated as separate from humans. Organisms (including humans) and resources compose ecosystems which, in turn, maintain biophysical feedback mechanisms that moderate processes acting on living (biotic) and non-living (abiotic) components of the planet. Ecosystems sustain life-supporting functions and produce natural capital like biomass production (food, fuel, fiber, and medicine), the regulation of climate, global biogeochemical cycles, water filtration, soil formation, erosion control, fl ...
Views: 1 wikipedia tts
Mestizo Chronicles: Sources, Readers, Orientations Colloquium at the JCB Library
 
02:27:56
Saturday, February 13, 2016 John Carter Brown Library, Brown University Providence, Rhode Island The writings of indigenous and mestizo authors are prone to be idealized and sometimes romanticized by contemporary historians who are directly concerned with interrogating colonial hierarchies. The aim of this colloquium is to work towards a more fundamental understanding of these sources by taking the texts themselves as the point of departure, rather than the ethnicity of their authors. What cultural presuppositions and forms of knowledge are inscribed in these works? What are their stylistic or literary models? What are their sources, and how are they transformed? To whom are these texts explicitly and implicitly addressed? How do the authors fashion themselves? Consideration of these questions may lead to more nuanced interpretation of the ideological nature of ‘mestizo chronicles’ and of the agenda of those who produced them.
Views: 449 Brown University
From Gamification to Experimental Games: Connection Series with Patrick Jagoda and Aasim Kham
 
01:01:40
In this talk, Professor Patrick Jagoda argued that games in the early twenty-first century should be conceived not merely as objects, forms, or activities, but as nothing less than a unique mode of experimental thought and learning. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGOytSubscribe About #UChicago: A destination for inquiry, research, and education, the University of Chicago empowers scholars to challenge conventional thinking. Our diverse community of creative thinkers celebrates ideas, and is celebrated for them. #UChicago on the Web: Home: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGO-home News: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGO-news Facebook: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGO-FB Twitter: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGO-TW Instagram: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGO-IG University of Chicago on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/uchicago *** ACCESSIBILITY: If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please email [email protected]
Political Concepts at Brown April 10, 2015 2 of 4
 
01:53:05
"Political Concepts at Brown: A Critical Lexicon in the Making" April 10, 2015 Session #2 - Speakers include: Beshara Doumani, History/Middle East Studies and Lukas Rieppel, History. Moderated by Adi Ophir, Cogut Center for the Humanities/ Middle East Studies. The goal of Political Concepts is to serve as a platform for revising, inventing, and experimenting with concepts while exploring the political dimension of their use and dissemination. Participants operate under the assumption that our era urgently needs a revised political lexicon that would help us better understand the world in which we live and act, and that the humanities at large can and should contribute toward such a revision. In the past, some of the participants revised key political concepts while others showed the political work done by terms and common nouns that are not usually considered “political.”
Views: 416 Brown University
The Christian and Muslim Perspectives on Palliative Care Conference - Day 1 PM Session
 
02:52:00
The Christian and Muslim Perspectives on Palliative Care Conference held on January 22 and 23, 2019, was jointly organized by the Vatican’s Pontifical Academy for Life and Georgetown University in Qatar with the aim of initiating a multidisciplinary exchange on the issues surrounding the treatment of patients facing life threatening illness and death, with a particular focus on opportunities and barriers to care in the region. Panel 2: Regulating Palliative Care: Legal Questions and Governing Frameworks - Dr. Kartina A. Choong, Reader of Medical Law and Ethics, Lancashire Law School at University of Central Lancashire - Dr. John Keown, Rose F. Kennedy Professor of Christian Ethics, Kennedy Institute of Ethics Panel 3: Framing Palliative Care: Ethical Concepts and Principles - Dr. Aasim Padela, Director, Program on Medicine and Religion at University of Chicago - Dr. Daniel Sulmasy, Acting Director, Kennedy Institute of Ethics
Capitalism | Wikipedia audio article
 
02:26:16
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capitalism 00:03:03 1 Etymology 00:06:58 2 History 00:08:57 2.1 Agrarian capitalism 00:10:37 2.2 Mercantilism 00:13:21 2.3 Industrial capitalism 00:15:03 2.4 Modern capitalism 00:19:28 2.4.1 Relationship to democracy 00:24:33 2.5 Varieties of capitalism 00:27:04 3 Characteristics 00:28:20 3.1 The market 00:30:33 3.2 Profit motive 00:31:57 3.3 Private property 00:33:07 3.4 Market competition 00:35:12 3.5 Economic growth 00:36:43 3.6 Reserve army of labour 00:45:23 3.6.1 Composition of the relative surplus population 00:48:26 3.7 As a mode of production 00:51:19 4 Supply and demand 00:52:45 4.1 Graphical representation of supply and demand 00:53:49 4.1.1 Supply schedule 00:56:54 4.1.2 Demand schedule 00:59:58 4.2 Equilibrium 01:01:05 4.3 Partial equilibrium 01:03:26 4.4 Empirical estimation 01:04:34 4.5 Macroeconomic uses of demand and supply 01:05:36 4.6 History 01:09:06 5 Role of government 01:10:52 5.1 Relationship to political freedom 01:12:26 6 Types of capitalism 01:13:07 6.1 Advanced capitalism 01:14:43 6.2 Finance capitalism 01:16:32 6.3 Mercantilism 01:17:33 6.4 Free market economy 01:18:16 6.5 Social market economy 01:19:12 6.6 State capitalism 01:22:17 6.7 Corporate capitalism 01:22:37 6.8 Mixed economy 01:23:27 6.9 Others 01:23:39 7 Capital accumulation 01:25:29 7.1 Background 01:29:03 7.2 Concentration and centralisation 01:30:50 7.3 The rate of accumulation 01:33:43 7.4 The circuit of capital accumulation from production 01:35:24 7.5 Simple and expanded reproduction 01:38:55 7.6 Capital accumulation as social relation 01:43:16 8 Wage labour 01:45:23 8.1 Types 01:48:33 9 Effects of war 01:55:39 10 Criticism 02:03:45 10.1 The profit motive 02:05:32 10.2 Comparison to slavery 02:13:30 10.3 Marxian responses 02:18:34 10.4 Criticisms on the Environmental Sustainability of Capitalism 02:19:31 10.5 Supply and demand 02:22:40 10.6 Externalities 02:23:48 10.7 Counter-criticisms 02:23:57 10.7.1 Austrian School 02:24:48 10.7.2 Ayn Rand Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7654517608970675 Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-C "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Capitalism is an economic system based on the private ownership of the means of production and their operation for profit. Characteristics central to capitalism include private property, capital accumulation, wage labor, voluntary exchange, a price system, and competitive markets. In a capitalist market economy, decision-making and investment are determined by every owner of wealth, property or production ability in financial and capital markets, whereas prices and the distribution of goods and services are mainly determined by competition in goods and services markets.Economists, political economists, sociologists and historians have adopted different perspectives in their analyses of capitalism and have recognized various forms of it in practice. These include laissez-faire or free market capitalism, welfare capitalism and state capitalism. Different forms of capitalism feature varying degrees of free markets, public ownership, obstacles to free competition and state-sanctioned social policies. The degree of competition in markets, the role of intervention and regulation, and the scope of state ownership vary across different models of capitalism. The extent to which different markets are free as well as the rules defining private property are matters of politics and policy. Most existing capitalist economies are mixed economies, which combine elements of free markets with state intervention and in some cases economic planning.Market economies have existed under many forms of government and in many different times, places and cultures. Modern capitalist societies—marked by a universalization of money-based social relations, a consistently large and system-wide class of workers who must work for wages, and a capitalist class which owns the means of pro ...
Views: 19 wikipedia tts
When Courts Plan: The Greening of New Delhi's Auto Rickshaws – Atul Pokharel
 
01:51:15
Atul Pokharel holds a PhD in Urban Studies and Planning from MIT, as well as a Bachelor's degree in Mathematics from Princeton University. Between the two degrees, he also learned how to design and conduct project evaluations in India and Nepal at a large multinational donor organization. He enjoys teaching almost as much as research and while a student at MIT, he taught six graduate courses and was nominated by his department for the University-wide teaching award.
House Session, Part 2
 
08:19:07
Views: 36228 CSPANHouse2011
CONVERSATION - Perry Anderson and Pablo Iglesias
 
01:38:53
In a special episode of "Otra vuelta de tuerka", Pablo Iglesias and Perry Anderson will talk about the specificity of Spain in contemporary Europe. The convergence and divergences of the anti-systemic movements that have recently emerged in Europe: the Portuguese left-wing government, the emergence of Jean-Luc Mélenchon's France Insoumise in the last presidential elections, the Corbyn phenomenon in British Labour Party, The short Greek experience and Podemos in Spain. This will lead to talk about the difficulties of making politics from the European periphery and the need to build a patriotism of the South. La Tuerka: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0oux2kiDINhX76StpGpA8g All rights belong to: La Tuerka
Views: 368 Spain Subtitled
Mellon Sawyer Seminar on Displacement | The Displaced Living and the Displaced Dead
 
01:55:47
Skip ahead to main speaker at 9:58 Through a yearlong series of workshops, seminars, courses, and cultural activities, Displacement and the Making of the Modern World will explore themes that integrate disparate studies of displacement. No major field of scholarly inquiry, scientific endeavor, or literary and artistic expression is untouched by the ways that displacement has shaped the modern world. Indeed, it is fair to say that the modern disciplines in the liberal arts and their enduring concerns developed through a centuries-long productive tension between enabling this world and producing critical knowledge about it. Yet, precisely because of its pervasiveness as a central element of the modern human experience, studies of or relating to displacement are fragmented and largely confined to silos of disciplinary and topical expertise. The central mission of this proposed seminar is to create an interdisciplinary commons, informed by the approaches and concerns of the humanities and interpretive social sciences, for the exploration of displacement not simply as a product of “other” forces, but as an engine for the formation of the modern world since the fifteenth century. This Mellon Sawyer Seminar addresses three overarching themes: (1) Histories: Displacement as a global and historically enduring phenomenon; (2) Ecologies: Displacement as an environmental and technological phenomenon; and (3) Subjectivities: Displacement as an affective and discursive phenomenon. A common thread is a focus on displacement as formative of power relations of inclusion and exclusion. Displacement and the Making of the Modern World pushes at the seams of the humanities, social sciences, and the natural and physical sciences by exploring long-term drivers of displacement. The wager here is that focused interdisciplinary conversation about displacement as an enduring and global phenomenon integral to the making of the modern world can lay the seeds for imagining alternatives futures.
2015 AAA Invited Session: IDENTITY, BELONGING AND THE BIOPOLITICS OF DNA IN COLONIAL MODERNITY
 
01:49:01
Genetic research into the origins, population histories, and structure of indigenous and diasporic populations have provided important scientific insights into the past. However, in and through this research, DNA has emerged as a potent and often problematic ontological device for producing identities, re/connection, and belonging. Operating within the context of colonial modernity, material productions of identity are often shaped by historical racial and social boundaries in the settler state, where DNA is caught up in various identity discourses that may reinforce, resist, or remodel colonial structures of power. This session will explore the ways in which genetic and material claims to identity are constructed within colonial modernity, where a biopolitic oriented to colonial structures of power influences who gets studied, what histories are relevant, who owns history, which bodies count, and where they belong. Panelists will also destabilize these historical dynamics by troubling genetic claims to identity and highlighting emerging work that reorients conventional power relations among the various stakeholders in genetic research. Furthermore, panelists will present and explore alternate, decolonized means of producing genetic science and situate these emerging genetic ontologies alongside non-scientific productions of identity and belonging. This panel will bring together diverse perspectives from genetics, anthropology, sociology, medicine, and law to explore how the material/semiotic power of DNA is deployed within the processes of political subject formation, and how genomics intersects with identity politics in colonial modernity. We will explore how DNA is entangled with discourses of survival and extinction, power and powerlessness, estrangement and familiarization, dis/placement, and appropriation, and will consider the role of scientific discourse and silence in constituting and negotiating identities. Building on previous work exploring the reification of biological race in contemporary genomics, this panel will theorize the generative processes by which such constructions emerge. In order to incorporate the diversity of voices and perspectives needed to critically evaluate the identity politics of DNA and subject formations within colonial modernity, we are proposing a two part, paired panel. Given the interrelatedness of the content in each session, it would be ideal for Part I to directly precede Part II. Part I will include six speakers and one discussant; Part II will include five speakers, one discussant, and 15 minutes for open discussion. This session (Part I) will explore issues of representation in genetic research, how they shape both historical and contemporary knowledge production, and the implications for generating identity and belonging. This session will also explore the current opportunities and future directions that arise from reorienting conventional power relations in genetic research.
Sociocultural evolution | Wikipedia audio article
 
58:55
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Sociocultural evolution 00:01:56 1 Introduction 00:04:42 2 Stadial theory 00:08:59 2.1 Sociocultural evolutionism and the idea of progress 00:23:04 2.2 Critique and impact on modern theories 00:26:40 2.3 Max Weber, disenchantment, and critical theory 00:28:36 3 Modern theories 00:33:02 3.1 Neoevolutionism 00:46:40 3.2 Sociobiology 00:49:48 3.3 Theory of modernization 00:52:19 3.4 Prediction for a stable cultural and social future 00:53:41 4 Contemporary perspectives 00:53:51 4.1 Political perspectives 00:55:06 4.2 Technological perspectives 00:57:01 4.3 Anthropological perspectives Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Sociocultural evolution, sociocultural evolutionism or cultural evolution are theories of cultural and social evolution that describe how cultures and societies change over time. Whereas sociocultural development traces processes that tend to increase the complexity of a society or culture, sociocultural evolution also considers process that can lead to decreases in complexity (degeneration) or that can produce variation or proliferation without any seemingly significant changes in complexity (cladogenesis). Sociocultural evolution is "the process by which structural reorganization is affected through time, eventually producing a form or structure which is qualitatively different from the ancestral form".Most of the 19th-century and some 20th-century approaches to socioculture aimed to provide models for the evolution of humankind as a whole, arguing that different societies have reached different stages of social development. The most comprehensive attempt to develop a general theory of social evolution centering on the development of sociocultural systems, the work of Talcott Parsons (1902–1979), operated on a scale which included a theory of world history. Another attempt, on a less systematic scale, originated with the world-systems approach from the 1970s. More recent approaches focus on changes specific to individual societies and reject the idea that cultures differ primarily according to how far each one is on some linear scale of social progress. Most modern archaeologists and cultural anthropologists work within the frameworks of neoevolutionism, sociobiology, and modernization theory. Many different societies have existed in the course of human history, with estimates as high as a total of over one million separate societies; however, as of 2013, the number of current, distinct societies had been estimated as only about two hundred.
Views: 26 wikipedia tts
Sarah Lopez | Migrant Detention, Incarceration and the Spatial Imagination | UB Lecture series
 
01:19:33
Texas has more migrant detention centers and migrant prisons than any other state in the Union. Sarah Lopez focuses the construction and design of migrant detention facilities in Texas since the 1960s in relation to immigration policy and private prison practices. Using archival and ethnographic methods that include historic newspaper articles, ICE contracts and documents, satellite imagery, field observations and interviews, this historic genealogy of the construction of detention facilities reveals the government’s abdication of design responsibilities as private prison corporations and construction companies assume authority and responsibility for making critical design decisions that impact migrants’ daily lives. Sarah Lopez | Assistant Professor of Architectural History, School of Architecture, University of Texas at Austin Sarah Lopez, a built environment historian and migration scholar, is an associate professor at the University of Texas at Austin. Lopez' book entitled, The Remittance Landscape: The Spaces of Migration in Rural Mexico and Urban USA was published by the University of Chicago Press in 2015 and won the 2017 Spiro Kostof Book Award from the Society of Architectural Historians. Her current research on the architectural history of immigrant detention facilities contributed to the Humanities Action Lab’s States of Incarceration national exhibit, on view from 2016 to 2019. Lopez was a Princeton Mellon fellow in 2016-2017, a Snell Fellow in 2017-2018, and is a faculty affiliate with American Studies, the Amos Rapoport Center for Human Rights and Justice, the Institute for Latin American Studies, and the Center for Mexican American Studies. She researches and teaches at the intersections of migration, ordinary landscapes, urbanism, and spatial justice. Co-Sponsored by the Cities and Society Research Workshop of the UB Humanities Institute