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Utilitarianism: Crash Course Philosophy #36
 
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Our next stop in our tour of the ethical lay of the land is utilitarianism. With a little help from Batman, Hank explains the principle of utility, and the difference between act and rule utilitarianism. Get your own Crash Course Philosophy mug or Chom Chom shirt from DFTBA: https://store.dftba.com/collections/crashcourse The Latest from PBS Digital Studios: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1mtdjDVOoOqJzeaJAV15Tq0tZ1vKj7ZV -- Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 1734909 CrashCourse
Residential School Survivor Personal Stories
 
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Part 1 of 2 Personal stories by Elder Hazel Squakin
Views: 16289 Aboriginal Education
FULL INTERVIEW: JOHN BORROWS
 
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Full interview: John Borrows Keywords: defining Indigenous law; teaching about Indigenous law; relationship between Indigenous laws & Canadian laws; inclusion & engagement; gender and Indigenous law; generalizations, stereotypes; sources of law. This video is of an interview with Dr. John Borrows, Anishinaabe, Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Law, University of Victoria. The interview was done as part of a larger project to create three video shorts about Indigenous law. This full interview is included online as part of an archive, for viewers who want to watch the full interview that took place. For more information about the project, and to watch the video shorts that feature parts of Dr. Borrows’ interview, go to http://www.uvic.ca/law/about/indigenous/indigenouslawresearchunit/ This videos were created as part of the Indigenous Law Video On Demand project, for the Indigenous Law Research Unit (ILRU) in the Faculty of Law, University of Victoria. The project included Indigenous and non-Indigenous people in collaboration and conversation. The video series was created by Kamala Todd (Indigenous City Media, Director & Editor), Emily Snyder (Project Lead & Producer), and Renée McBeth (Associate Producer). The project was supported by a grant from the .CA Community Investment Program and ILRU. © Indigenous Law Research Unit, 2015
13. Commodity Models
 
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MIT 18.S096 Topics in Mathematics with Applications in Finance, Fall 2013 View the complete course: http://ocw.mit.edu/18-S096F13 Instructor: Alexander Eydeland This is a guest lecture on commodity modeling, analyzing the methods of generating profit with a constrained system. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms More courses at http://ocw.mit.edu
Views: 14925 MIT OpenCourseWare
Graph properties of transcription networks
 
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MIT 8.591J Systems Biology, Fall 2014 View the complete course: http://ocw.mit.edu/8-591JF14 Instructor: Jeff Gore Prof. Jeff Gore continues the discussion of oscillators, including alternative designs for oscillators. He then discusses the article Emergence of scaling in random networks, by Barabási & Albert. The final topic is network motifs. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms More courses at http://ocw.mit.edu
Views: 2843 MIT OpenCourseWare
Wahkohtowin: Cree Natural Law
 
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Discussions by four Cree elders; George Brertton, Fred Campiou, Isaac Chamakese and William Dreaver, give insight into the differences between Canadian law and Cree Natural Law and why Natural Law is needed in contemporary society. Wahkohtowin means "everything is related." It is one of the basic principles of Cree Natural Law passed through language, song, prayer, and storytelling. The elders explain that by following the teachings of Wahkohtowin individuals, communities and societies are healthier.
Views: 32962 BearPaw Legal
Colonialism and Indian Residential Schools
 
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Part 1 of 3 Central Okanagan School District presents Angela White and the Indian Residential School Survivors' Society as a guest speaker on Canada's Residential Schools. This first video is about the colonial aspect of Residential Schools.
Views: 12919 Aboriginal Education
1. Introduction to Superposition
 
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MIT 8.04 Quantum Physics I, Spring 2013 View the complete course: http://ocw.mit.edu/8-04S13 Instructor: Allan Adams In this lecture, Prof. Adams discusses a series of thought experiments involving "box apparatus" to illustrate the concepts of uncertainty and superposition, which are central to quantum mechanics. The first ten minutes are devoted to course information. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms More courses at http://ocw.mit.edu
Views: 1375185 MIT OpenCourseWare
PRC Forum: James Buchanan (U1026) - Full Video
 
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James Buchanan, Professor Economics, George Mason University, 1986 Nobel Laureate in Economics, discusses political and constitutional rules within which politicians operate and summarizes his analysis of incentives faced by politicians and bureaucrats. He wants emphasis on long term consequences of actions and would like to see the Constitution amended to balance the budget. Check out our Facebook page here: www.facebook.com/FreeToChooseNetwork Visit our media website to find other programs here: http://freetochoosemedia.org/index.php Connect with us on Twitter here: https://twitter.com/FreeToChooseNet Learn more about our company here: http://freetochoosenetwork.org Shop for related products here: http://www.freetochoose.net Stream from FreeToChoose.TV here: http://freetochoose.tv
Are the Metis Treaty People?
 
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Dr. Adam Gaudry from the University of Saskatchewan argues that the Manitoba Act should be thought of as a treaty between the Metis Nation and Canada. Part of the 2015-2016 Weweni Indigenous Scholars Speaker Series presented by the Indigenous Affairs Office. From January 6, 2016.
Views: 8908 UWinnipeg
Idle No More: Protest to Change?
 
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Momentum and a movement: Idle No More organizers, supporters and observers discuss the objectives and significance of the movement with Steve Paikin.
'Derivatives Deconstructed' with Professor Dan Awrey
 
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Delivered as part of the Business Law Workshop series at the Oxford Law Faculty.
Views: 773 Oxford Law Faculty
Professor Robert Miller: The Doctrine of Discovery and Manifest Destiny
 
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Official video archive of presentation by Professor Robert Miller at the Indigenous Peoples Forum on the Doctrine of Discovery March 23, 2012 at the Arizona State Capitol House of Representatives
Views: 16555 Tonatierra
Elder In The Making | Episode 5: A Broken Treaty
 
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What follows from the treaty signing is a genocide in slow motion. Elder Narcisse Blood shares his story growing up in residential school and the person he has become. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Connect with us: Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/optiklocal/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/optiklocal
Views: 9132 STORYHIVE
2014 Sol Kanee Lecture - Justice Murray Sinclair
 
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The Arthur V. Mauro Centre for Peace and Justice at St. Paul's College, University of Manitoba, is proud to present the Eleventh Annual Sol Kanee Lecture on International Peace and Justice. This year's guest lecturer was Justice Murray Sinclair, Chair of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (www.trc.ca). Justice Sinclair addressed the question: What Do We Do About the Legacy of Indian Residential Schools? The lecture took place on Monday, September 29, 2014 at the University of Manitoba. 0:04 Opening Remarks and Welcome: Dr. Sean Byrne, Director, Arthur V. Mauro Centre for Peace and Justice at St. Paul’s College 4:32 Greetings: Dr. Chris Adams, Rector, St. Paul’s College at the University of Manitoba 6:55 Introduction of Justice Murray Sinclair: Dr. Niigaanwewidam Sinclair, Assistant Professor, Native Studies, University of Manitoba 17:20 What Do We Do About the Legacy of Indian Residential Schools? Justice Murray Sinclair Part 1 46:28 Video presentations – Justice Murray included a series of video interviews with residential school survivors as a part of his lecture 53:30 What Do We Do About the Legacy of Indian Residential Schools? Justice Murray Sinclair Part 2 1:29:33 Question and Answer Period: Dr. Sean Byrne, Moderator 1:59:12 Acknowledgement Peace and Conflicts Studies students, Ms. Mary Anne Clarke and Ms. Jennifer Ham acknowledge and thank Justice Sinclair 2:01:18 Concluding Remarks: Dr. Sean Byrne For more information on this and other Mauro Centre events, please visit: www.facebook.com/maurocentre www.umanitoba.ca/colleges/st_pauls/mauro_centre/
Views: 1217 MauroCentre
Capital in the Twenty-First Century
 
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The French economist Thomas Piketty (Paris School of Economics) discussed his new book, Capital in the Twenty-First Century at the Graduate Center. In this landmark work, Piketty argues that the main driver of inequality—the tendency of returns on capital to exceed the rate of economic growth—threatens to generate extreme inequalities that stir discontent and undermine democratic values. He calls for political action and policy intervention. Joseph Stiglitz (Columbia University), Paul Krugman (Princeton University), and Steven Durlauf (University of Wisconsin--Madison) participated in a panel moderated by LIS Senior Scholar Branko Milanovic. The event was introduced by LIS Director Janet Gornick, professor of political science and sociology at the Graduate Center. Cosponsored by the Luxembourg Income Study Center and the Advanced Research Collaborative.
Is there a traditional perspective of Truth and Reconciliation?
 
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A presentation by Honourable Mr. Justice Murray Sinclair as part of the Indigenous Knowledge Seminar Series offered by Aboriginal Focus Programs, Extended Education, the University of Manitoba, held during an open house held at the University of Manitoba DOWNTOWN: Aboriginal Education Centre. Justice Sinclair is the Chair of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada, established as an outcome of the 2006 Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement. The University of Manitoba has made a commitment to helping the Commission achieve its objectives http://umanitoba.ca/visionary/human-rights.html. Justice Sinclair has served as Associate Chief Judge of the Provincial Court of Manitoba since 1988 and the Court of Queen's Bench of Manitoba since 2001. Shortly after his appointment as Associate Chief Judge of the Provincial Court of Manitoba in 1988, he was appointed Co-Commissioner, along with Court of Queen's Bench Associate Chief Justice A.C. Hamilton, of Manitoba's Aboriginal Justice Inquiry. That inquiry looked into the treatment of Aboriginal people by the justice system and made more than 300 recommendations for change including the establishment of tribal courts. Justice Sinclair was born and raised on the Old St. Peter's Indian Reserve in the Selkirk area north of Winnipeg. He graduated from the University of Manitoba, Faculty of Law in 1979 and taught as an adjunct professor of Law as well as adjunct professor in the Faculty of Graduate Studies at the University of Manitoba. His Ojibway name is Mizanageezhik (One Who Speaks of Pictures in the Sky). He is a member of the traditional Midewiwin Society.
Bringing them home: separation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children from their families
 
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This documentary DVD was produced in 1997 and forms part of the Bringing them home education resource for use in Australian classrooms. For more on the report see: https://bth.humanrights.gov.au/ This resource is based on 'Bringing them home' , the report of the National Inquiry into the Separation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children from Their Families, and on the history of forcible separation and other policies which have impacted on the lives of Indigenous Australians. This documentary complements a collection of curriculum-linked activities and teaching resources, plus a range of photographs, maps and diagrams, timelines, legal texts and glossaries. The Australian Human Rights Commission invites teachers and students to use this resource to explore, understand and reflect on one of the most difficult chapters of our national history and to engage with some of the key concepts involved in the reconciliation debate in Australia. For the education resource see: https://www.humanrights.gov.au/education/human-rights-school-classroom Warning: This video may contain images / voices of deceased Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander persons. Video produced by Oziris. © Australian Human Rights Commission
Epstein Conference - Panel 3: Intellectual Property
 
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"Panel 3: Intellectual Property: Patents, Copyrights, Trademarks, Trade Secrets, Misappropriation" In April 2018, the University of Chicago Law School and New York University School of Law co-sponsored a conference in honor of the fifty-year academic career and scholarship of Richard A. Epstein.
Senior Loeb Scholar Lecture: Bruno Latour, “A Tale of Seven Planets – An Exercise in Gaiapolitics”
 
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Until recently the expression ‘we don't live in the same planet' was a metaphorical way of expressing no more than a disagreement. Today it has taken a literal meaning that the lecture will pursue in trying to map contrasted definitions of what used to be called “the natural world”. Bruno Latour is now emeritus professor associated with the médialab and the program in political arts (SPEAP) of Sciences Po Paris. Since January 2018 he is for two years fellow at the Zentrum fur Media Kunst (ZKM) and professor at the HfG both in Karlsruhe. Member of several academies and recipient of six honorary doctorate, he is the recipient in 2013 of the Holberg Prize. He has written and edited more than twenty books and published more than one hundred and fifty articles. You can find more informations on his website (http://www.bruno-latour.fr/).
Views: 2865 Harvard GSD
Thomas Piketty visits HLS to debate his book 'Capital in the Twenty-First Century'
 
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On Friday March 6 at Harvard Law School, renowned economist Thomas Piketty, professor of Economics, EHESS and at the Paris School of Economics, visited the law school to debate his bestselling book Capital in the Twenty-First Century with several Harvard faculty, including: Sven Beckert Laird Bell Professor of American History, Harvard University; Christine Desan, Leo Gottlieb Professor of Law, Harvard Law School; David Kennedy, Manley O. Hudson Professor of Law, Harvard Law School; and Stephen Marglin, Walter S. Barker Chair in the Department of Economics, Harvard University.
Views: 20102 Harvard Law School
Aboriginal Education
 
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Education has long been heralded as the key to economic improvement. Leading economist Don Drummond has studied the economic inequality of Canada's First Nations and concluded that every effort must be taken to lead young people to post-secondary education. What barriers make a university or college education extremely difficult to achieve for First Nations young people?
Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality 20th Anniversary Symposium (3 of 4)
 
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Transformational Texts: The Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality 20th Anniversary Symposium (Part 3 of 4) Current and former faculty reflect on how the CSGS has influenced their work over the years, with a focus on texts written by the panelists that have been transformative for the field as a whole. Featuring: Linda Zerilli, Lauren Berlant, George Chauncey, Susan Gal, Rochona Majumdar, Martha Nussbaum, Geoffrey Stone ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGOytSubscribe About #UChicago: A destination for inquiry, research, and education, the University of Chicago empowers scholars to challenge conventional thinking. Our diverse community of creative thinkers celebrates ideas, and is celebrated for them. #UChicago on the Web: Home: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGO-home News: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGO-news Facebook: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGO-FB Twitter: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGO-TW Instagram: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGO-IG University of Chicago on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/uchicago *** ACCESSIBILITY: If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please email [email protected]
Big Thinking - Justice Sinclair - What do we do about the legacy of Indian residential schools?
 
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The Honourable Justice Murray Sinclair, Chair of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC), presents Congress 2015’s introductory Big Thinking lecture. Justice Sinclair was appointed Associate Chief Judge of the Provincial Court of Manitoba in March of 1988 and to the Court of Queen's Bench of Manitoba in January 2001. In Ottawa to preside over the TRC’s closing events and the release of the Commission’s final report, Justice Sinclair discusses the legacy of residential schools and offer a call for action towards reconciliation in Canada, including the role of universities and academics in this process. L’Honorable Juge Murray Sinclair, Président de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation du Canada (CVR), anime la première causerie Voir grand au Congrès 2015. Le juge Murray Sinclair a été nommé juge en chef adjoint de la Cour provinciale du Manitoba en mars 1988 et de la Cour d’appel du Manitoba en janvier 2001. À Ottawa pour présider les événements de clôture de la CVR et la diffusion du rapport final de la Commission, le juge Sinclair discute de l’héritage des pensionnats autochtones et proposera des mesures qui tendent vers la réconciliation au Canada, y compris du rôle des universités dans ce processus.
Views: 8681 IdeasIdees
Judge Maryka Omatsu, Reconciling Injustices in a Pluralistic Canada
 
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Simon Fraser University's Centre for Dialogue presents Judge Maryka Omatsu, feature speaker for the Jan 23, 2014 Reconciling Injustices in a Pluralistic Canada community dialogue. About Reconciling Injustices in a Pluralistic Canada This full-day dialogue drew upon the knowledge and experiences of affected communities to identify shared principles and approaches to support the reconciliation of injustices in Canadian society. The dialogue hosted 120 community leaders involved in the reconciliation of specific injustices, government officials, decision-makers from major institutions and members of the public. More information: www.sfu.ca/reconciling-injustices. About Judge Maryka Omatsu Maryka Omatsu, a third generation Japanese Canadian, was born in Hamilton, Ontario. She graduated with a M.A. from the U. of T. and an LL.B. from Osgoode Hall Law School. During the following 37 years, Maryka has been a lawyer for 16 years, practised human rights, environmental and criminal law; worked for all levels of Government; taught in Toronto, China and Japan; chaired the Ontario Human Rights Appeals Tribunal and adjudicated for the Ontario Law Society. 21 years ago, Maryka was the first woman of East Asian ancestry to be appointed a judge in Canada. Today, she is semi-retired, judges part time in Toronto, and lives in both Vancouver and Toronto. Maryka was active in the Japanese Canadian community's struggle for redress, as a member of the National Association of Japanese Canadians negotiation team. Her book, Bittersweet Passage documented that history and won several prizes. It was published in Japan in 1994.
Understanding the TRC Calls to Action
 
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March 23, 2016 Panel Discussion Re-Visioning Teacher Education: Responding to the TRC Calls-to-Action 2016 University of Manitoba
This Is My Story by Henry Basil - TRC March 29, 2014
 
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Free News Sharing and On-Line Art Gallery http://www.ciactivist.org FEATURE: The 2016 Fire and Rain art project that began in early January was inspired by news stories on wildfires that burned throughout Western Canada in 2015. Paintings were displayed outdoors publicly throughout Edmonton and their stories shared on YouTube. I used art from the beginning to defend freedom of expression on the Alberta Legislature grounds when it was verbally banned 3 times by Legislature officials. Some of the YouTubes published shared how the wildfires and flooding that followed affected Albertans, their communities and the environment. I hope my art and the stories shared will inspire us to contemplate the calamities in Alberta of 2016 as a collective and together help each other find ways and better solutions to save our planet and our children's future. Doug Brinkman
Views: 2199 Doug Brinkman
RSC 2012 Governor General Lecture Series: We Are All Treaty People: Accepting the Queen's Hand
 
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The Royal Society of Canada 2012 Governor General Lecture Series Professor James Miller, FRSC November 10th 2011 - University of Manitoba Duration: 40:15
Views: 904 RSC SRC
Think Indigenous 5 Colby Tootoosis_March_19_2015
 
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Colby Tootoosis, Youth Spokesperson, Headman Poundmaker
Views: 2373 Usask
Kees Christiaanse, “Inversion and Subtraction in Urban Design”
 
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The European city is a nucleus in a network of approximately 500 cities with an average population of 50.000-1.000.000 inhabitants and an average distance of 100 km. In-between, there is a cultural landscape which has many qualities despite its dense population. This cultural landscape is pervaded by efficient transport infrastructures. Despite some deficits, this centuries-old constellation has a high quality of life and urbanity compared to most other urban areas on earth. Above all, it is important to optimize this constellation and not just focus on individual compact cities. Today, we are commonly taught that at least 50% of the world's population is living in cities. However, it is forgotten that half of these 50% are likely to live in urbanized landscapes. Also, the majority of the European cities’ population lives on the outskirts of the city and not in the center. The urbanized landscape, for example the entire ‘Rhine banana’, is interesting because it contains a high density of population, urban facilities, industry and logistics, as well as a large proportion of agricultural land: a ‘productive' landscape. This landscape cannot be designed, but only steered. The steering mechanisms consist rather of ‘braking factors’ that protect against over-urbanization than of propulsive building projects.
Views: 857 Harvard GSD
Decolonizing Language Revitalization
 
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September 25, 2013 - How has Eurocentric anthropology and linguistics affected the way we interpret our elders and ancestors who share their cultural knowledge with foreign researchers? Join us for a presentation with Khelsilem Rivers and April Charlo, indigenous peoples from community-based and cultural revitalization backgrounds, who will be discussing decolonization of language revitalization. Their presentation and open dialogue will address the context of rapid language loss and decline, and how colonization has affected or is embedded in the strategies of revitalization. In an effort to revitalize Indigenous languages, communities may have unknowingly adopted or assimilated colonized ways of thinking as they invest interest and attempt to repair or restore ties to culture and language. Are we learning to speak Sḵwx̱wú7mesh, Nēhiyawēwin, Kanien'kéha, et all with an English-mind or are we learning to speak Sḵwx̱wú7mesh, Nēhiyawēwin, Kanien'kéha with a Sḵwx̱wú7mesh, Nēhiyaw, Kanien'keháka mind? Indigenous languages represent one of the darkest ways in which ethnocide and cultural genocide have occurred. It is expected in the next twenty-five years over 700 of the worlds Indigenous languages will be forgotten. In the Vancouver area alone, the two Indigenous languages are considered critical endangered; Sḵwx̱wú7mesh (Squamish) language has five to seven fluent speakers and hən̓q̓əmin̓əm has one fluent speaker left. Decolonizing Language Revitalization aims to put forward perspectives of shifting values, cultural understandings, and impacts on community. It is the stories we tell ourselves (as a people) that impacts who we believe we are, and then who we become. But if the stories -- even including, or especially the Indigenous ones -- are filtered through colonialism, we have become a different people because of it. April Charlo from Bitterroot Salish people and is a member of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes, Montana. Khelsilem Rivers is a Sḵwx̱wú7mesh-Kwakwa̱ka̱'wakw language revitalization activist from Vancouver. Supported by SFU's Vancity Office of Community Engagement http://sfuwoodwards.ca/index.php/community
FULL STORY: Failing Canada’s First Nations Children
 
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Canadian kids from isolated communities forced to move away from their families – just to go to school. For more info, please go to www.global16x9.com.
Views: 189826 16x9onglobal
Implementing the Vision: Chapter 4- Stepping into Governance
 
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A first for Canada, the Tripartite First Nations Health Plan calls on BC, Canada, and BC First Nations to work together to close the health gap. Drawing on the wisdom of our indigenous neighbours -This chapter outlines a vision for increased First Nations control over the design and delivery of health services.
Views: 5338 fnhealthcouncil
Wilton Little Child
 
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Views: 1344 ulethbridge
National Aboriginal Day (2010)
 
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National Aboriginal Day (NAD) is celebrated every June 21st. NAD is a time for all Canadians to recognize the unique heritage, the diverse cultures and the outstanding contributions of First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples. For more information about Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada, please visit http://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca. For more information about National Aboriginal day, please visit http://www.nad.gc.ca. Read a transcript of this video on the AANDC web site: http://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca/eng/1100100013727/1100100013729
Views: 4188 GCIndigenous
Knowledge is Power – building capacities for First Nations control of health services
 
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Dr. Jeff Reading Director of the Centre for Aboriginal Health Research based at the University of Victoria (UVic) Professor in the School of Public Health and Social Policy, Faculty of Human and Social Development, UVic Dr. Reading’s research has brought attention to such critical issues as disease prevention, tobacco use and misuse, healthy living, accessibility to health care, and diabetes among Aboriginal people in Canada. His determination to develop solutions contributed to the creation of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research - Institute of Aboriginal Peoples’ Health in 2000 as part of a movement calling for a national advanced research agenda in the area of Aboriginal health. The outcome of the CIHR-IAPH is to improve the health of Aboriginal Peoples’ living in Canada and work collaboratively to improve indigenous peoples’ health globally.
Views: 1419 Population Data BC
UNREPENTANT: Canada's Residential Schools Documentary
 
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This award winning documentary reveals Canada's darkest secret - the deliberate extermination of indigenous (Native American) peoples and the theft of their land under the guise of religion. This never before told history as seen through the eyes of this former minister (Kevin Annett) who blew the whistle on his own church, after he learned of thousands of murders in its Indian Residential Schools. GET A DIGITAL DOWNLOAD: http://www.amazon.com/Unrepentant-Annett-Canada-Genocide-Documentary/dp/B00IMQOT7E First-hand testimonies from residential school survivors are interwoven with Kevin Annett's own story of how he faced firing, de-frocking, and the loss of his family, reputation and livelihood as a result of his efforts to help survivors and bring out the truth of the residential schools. Best Director Award at the 2006 New York Independent Film and Video Festival, and Best International Documentary at the 2006 Los Angeles Independent Film Festival LEARN MORE: http://kevinannett.com/ Produced By Louie Lawless, Kevin Annett and Lorie O'Rourke 2006
Views: 200653 Independent_Documentary
FNS - Elder Teachings by Napos
 
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This is an oral recording of Medicine Wheel teachings by Napos, Menominee Nation. The oral teachings are accompanied by video images and pictures. The oral teachings reflect a traditional First Nations worldview and including teachings on concept of "4" and the Seven Gifts as a way of living in the world.
Views: 2528 UW Green Bay
Building Reconciliation: Universities Answering the TRC Calls to Action
 
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The University of Saskatchewan brought together university presidents and Aboriginal leaders from across Canada November 18-19, 2015 to discuss how universities can play a role in closing the Aboriginal education gap. The plenary event included remarks from TRC Commissioner Justice Murray Sinclair, Assembly of First Nations Chief Perry Bellegarde, Northwest Territories Deputy Premier Jackson Lafferty, Federation of Saskatchewan Indian Nations Chief Bobby Cameron, and Métis Nation Saskatchewan president Robert Doucette. More information is here: http://www.usask.ca/trc2015/
Views: 1061 Usask
Andrea Smith: Sexual Violence and American Indian Genocide
 
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In this lecture, author, scholar, and activist Andrea Smith of INCITE! Women of Color against Violence discussed sexual violence in American Indian communities and the role of sexual violence in genocide. Smith argues hat sexual violence is an inherent part of the colonial project. She also asserts that sexual violence--as a weapon of both patriarchy and colonialism--must be approached from an anti-colonial perspective. Finally, she shares her thoughts on organizing against sexual violence and argues for a "mass movement" against sexual violence that exists outside of current non-profit structures. Mediamouse.org
Views: 21812 mediamouse
The Wellbriety Journey to Forgiveness
 
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Documentary on the Abuses of the Indian Boarding Schools. Discusses the intergenerational trauma in native communities. The "Wellbriety Movement: Journey of Forgiveness" is now available on Youtube, www.whitebison.org , or free on DVD. Email [email protected] for DVD, include mailing address.
Views: 106997 Don Coyhis
Aboriginal Youth & Media Conference at MOA (Part Two)
 
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Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by the Museum of Anthropology. "Assert, Defend, Take Space: Aboriginal Youth Conference on Identity, Activism and Film" was a day-long conference on issues of concern to Aboriginal youth. Artists from the Claiming Space: Voices of Urban Aboriginal Youth exhibition were joined by young filmmakers and activists from across Canada. Building off of the screened films, panelists discussed themes of youth identity and politics, the objectification of Indigenous women, and environmentalism and youth activism. "Claiming Space: Voices of Urban Aboriginal Youth"" is an exhibition that looked at the diverse ways urban Aboriginal youth are asserting their identity and affirming their relationship to both urban spaces and ancestral territories. Unfiltered and unapologetic, over 20 young artists from across Canada, the US, and around the world define what it really means to be an urban Aboriginal youth today. In doing so they challenge centuries of stereotyping and assimilation policies.This exhibit will leave visitors with the understanding that today's urban Aboriginal youth are not only acutely aware of the ongoing impacts of colonization, but are also creatively engaging with decolonizing movements through new media, film, fashion, photography, painting, performance, creative writing and traditional art forms. Artists in the exhibition include Alison Bremner (Tlingit), Deanna Bittern (Ojibwe), Jamie Blankenship-Attig (Nlaka’pamux, Secwepemc, Nez Perce, Muskoday Cree), Kelli Clifton (Tsimshian), Jeneen Frei Njootli (Vuntut Gwitchin), Ippiksaut Friesen (Inuit), Clifton Guthrie (Tsimshian), Cody Lecoy (Okanagan/Esquimalt), Arizona Leger (Fijian, Samoan, Tongan, Maori), Danielle Morsette (Stó:lō /Suquamish), Ellena Neel (Kwakwaka'wakw/Ahousaht), Zach Soakai (Tongan, Samoan), Diamond Point (Musqueam), Crystal Smith de Molina (Git’ga’at), Nola Naera (Maori), Kelsey Sparrow (Musqueam/Anishinabe), Cole Speck (Kwakwaka'wakw), Rose Stiffarm ((Siksika Blackfoot, Chippewa Cree, Tsartlip Saanich, Cowichan, A'aninin, Nakoda, French, & Scottish), Taleetha Tait (Wet’suwet’en), Marja Bål Nango (Sámi, Norway), Harry Brown (Kwakwaka'wakw), Anna McKenzie (Opaskwayak Cree, Manitoba), Sarah Yankoo (Austrian, Scottish, Algonquin, Irish and Romanian), Raymond Caplin (Mi’gmac), Emilio Wawatie (Anishanabe) and the Northern Collection (Toombz/Shane Kelsey [Mohawk], and the Curse/Cory Golder [Mi’maq]). Also included are works from the Urban Native Youth Association, Musqueam youth and the Native Youth Program. The exhibition was curated by Pam Brown (Heiltsuk Nation), Curator, Pacific Northwest, and Curatorial Assistant Elle-Máijá Tailfeathers (Blackfoot, Blood Reserve/Sami, northern Norway).
Dr. Henry Yu, Reconciling Injustices in a Pluralistic Canada
 
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Simon Fraser University's Centre for Dialogue presents Dr. Henry Yu, UBC History Professor, Co-Chair of City of Vancouver's "Dialogues between Urban Aboriginal, First Nations, and Immigrant Communities" Project (2010-2012), and feature speaker for the Reconciling Injustices in a Pluralistic Canada community dialogue. About Reconciling Injustices in a Pluralistic Canada This full-day dialogue drew upon the knowledge and experiences of affected communities to identify shared principles and approaches to support the reconciliation of injustices in Canadian society. The dialogue hosted 120 community leaders involved in the reconciliation of specific injustices, government officials, decision-makers from major institutions and members of the public. More information: www.sfu.ca/reconciling-injustices. About Dr. Henry Yu Dr. Henry Yu was born in Vancouver, B.C., and received his BA in Honours History from UBC and an MA and PhD in History from Princeton University. Besides being the Principal of St. John's College, Yu is involved in the collaborative effort to re-imagine the history of Vancouver and of Canada by focusing on how migrants from Asia, Europe, and other parts of the Americas engaged with each other and with First Nations peoples historically. He was the Co-Chair of the City of Vancouver's project, "Dialogues between First Nations, Urban Aboriginal, and Immigrant Communities". Yu is committed to expanding the engagement between academic research and the communities which the university serves. Between 2010-2012, he was the Project Lead for the $1.175 million "Chinese Canadian Stories" project involving universities and a wide spectrum of over 29 community organizations across Canada. In 2012 he was honoured for his work with a Queen Elizabeth Diamond Jubilee Medal. He is currently writing a book entitled "Pacific Canada," another book entitled "How Tiger Woods Lost His Stripes," as well as a third book project which examines the history of Chinese migration in the Pacific world.
Canada Lecture: The Demographic Profile of First Nations in Canada
 
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Canada Lecture: The Demographic Profile of First Nations in Canada with Keith Conn -- Chief Operation Officer, First Nations Statistical Institute (FNSI) March 27, 2012 Bannatyne Campus, University of Manitoba The Canada Lecture is an initiative from the Canadian Race Relations Foundation, Canada's leading agency dedicated to the elimination of racism in the country. This lecture took place with the joined participation of the Canadian Race Relations Foundation, the First Nations Statistical Institute and the University of Manitoba.
Engaging Minds: Jim Miller
 
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Jim Miller - Canada Research Chair Native-Newcomer Relations It's an exciting time for Jim Miller to be studying Native-Newcomer Relations. As Canada Research Chair in Native-Newcomer Relations at the U of S he explores why we have had so much trouble living together in the past and how we might build better relationships in the future.
Views: 460 uofsresearch
Think Indigenous 8 Micheal Linklater_March_19_2015
 
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Micheal Linklater, Program Coordinator for White Buffalo Youth Lodge
Views: 3000 Usask
Haida Art-Northern Villages Part 2.m4v
 
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In November of 2008, Dr. George MacDonald, Director of the Bill Reid Centre for Northwest Coast Art Studies at SFU and author of "Haida Monumental Art", gave a 3-part lecture series on Haida Villages. 

Dr. MacDonald is a renowned expert on Northwest Coast art and has written a series of books on the subject. The presentations are illustrated with historical photographs from the 1870's and onward and explore the distinctive art of twenty-five Haida villages. 

The final instalment of these lectures, "Northern Villages", has been broken down into 2 parts.
National Chief Perry Bellegarde - Canada 2020 Aboriginal Peoples and Economic Development
 
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Canada 2020 Event - Aboriginal Peoples and Economic Development
Harvest of Hope: 4 Phil Fontaine
 
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In the spirit of Thanksgiving, this timely and insightful forum moderated by Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian Director Kevin Gover (Pawnee/Comanche) focuses on topical issues of reconciliation and highlights national apologies made to Native peoples. The symposium covers the eloquent apology issued in June 2008 by the Canadian government for the abuse and cultural loss suffered by Aboriginal peoples in Canada's residential schools. It includes a presentation on the Native American Apology Resolution recently passed in the United States Senate as well as an examination of reconciliation efforts in Guatemala. A wrap-up speaker considers the issues involved in apologies and reconciliation processes in a broad scope. Concluding with panel discussion and questions from the audience, Harvest of Hope seeks a deeper, more inclusive understanding of our national narratives and the experiences of the Native peoples of the Americas. In Part 4, Phil Fontaine gives a talk entitled, "The Apology Breakthrough: Now What?" Chief Phil Fontaine (Sagkeeng First Nation) is a dedicated and highly respected leader in Canada. He has been instrumental in facilitating change and advancement for First Nations people from the time he was first elected to public office as Chief, at the young age of twenty-eight. He is a proud member of the Sagkeeng First Nation in Manitoba and still plays an active role in the support of his community. In the early 1980s he was elected to the position of Manitoba Regional Chief for the Assembly of First Nations. When his term expired in 1991, he was elected Grand Chief of the Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs where he served three consecutive terms. He played a key role in the development of Manitoba's Framework Agreement Initiative and in the defeat of the Meech Lake Accord, and signed an Employment Equity Agreement with thirty-nine federal agencies. In 1997 he stepped onto the national stage where he was elected to the highest elected position in First Nations politics, National Chief. He is now serving an unprecedented third term in office. His list of accomplishments as National Chief include signing the Declaration of Kinship and Cooperation of the Indigenous and First Nations of North America; being the first Indigenous leader to address the Organization of American States; leading the successful resolution and settlement of the 150-year Indian residential school tragedy; the Making Poverty History Campaign; lobbying for the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People; and negotiating a fair and just process for the settlement of specific land claims. National Chief Fontaine has received many awards and honors for his work, including four honorary degrees and membership in the Order of Manitoba. This symposium took place in the Rasmuson Theater of the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, DC on November 13, 2008.
Views: 2212 SmithsonianNMAI