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11 Most Massive Mines in the World
 
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From the worlds largest gold mine found on the top of a mountain to the largest diamond mine in the world here are the most massive mines in the world! Subscribe to American EYE! 5.. Asbestos Mine, Canada Also known as the Jeffrey Mine, it’s located in Asbestos, Quebec and it was in operation until 2012. It’s a whopping 2 kilometers wide and 370 meters deep! Check out this thing on google maps and you can tell how completely massive this thing is! It’s the by far the largest asbestos mine in the world. For a long period of time, people would use this mineral to put into their walls and keep their homes from catching on fire! But recently there’s been a link with asbestos and a disease called mesothelioma, which is a lung condition. This is a toxic substance that people should avoid, so obviously this large mine went out of business. The lake at the bottom might look like an inviting blue, but you can bet your bottom dollar, it’s highly toxic! The small town that grew with the thriving asbestos industry feels like they’ve kind of lost their identity once the mine was forced to close, but people do still live there. 4. Mcarthur River Uranium Mine In case you were wondering which mine produces the most uranium in the world, that would be of course the Mcarthur River uranium mine in Saskatchewan Canada. This huge deposit was found in 1988 and finally a mining operation took place in 1997, when it began producing what’s known as Yellowcake. It’s not the kind of yellow cake you’d eat with your grandparents. This stuff has a horrific odor and basically what it is, is concentrated uranium powder which can then be used for powering nuclear reactors. We imagine this powdery substance is quite difficult to get ahold of. There aren’t a ton of photos of this place but, it does produce about 13 percent of the global uranium production across the globe. 3. Diavik Diamond Mine In case you thought it was Africa who had all the massive diamond mines, think again! The Diavik Diamond mine, found in the the northwest territories of Canada is one of the largest producers of diamonds in the Northern hemisphere and this place is pretty crazy! They annually produce 7 million carats of diamonds each year and you better believe it’s not easy to get here. The Diavik mine is found north of the arctic circle and it’s definitely cold! This photo here shows the subarctic landscapes that surround the diamond mine. You thought getting to work in the morning was tough for you? Imagine trying to get to work here! Just recently in 2015, this diamond produced what was known as the Diavik Foxfire 187.7 which is one of the largest rough gem quality diamonds ever produced. 2. Siberian Diamond Mine Also known as the Mirny Mine, The USSR began searching for ways to make to make themselves a more economical stable and independent union. In 1955 the Soviets discovered large diamond deposits at this site in the far away lands of Siberia and many people got to work very quickly in order to help bring wealth to the union. After about 20 years of operations, they finally decided that At one point this mine produced 10 million carats of diamonds a year and reaches a max depth of 524 meters or around 1700 feet making it the 2nd largest excavated hole in the world. The mine is so deep, airspace is closed over the hole due to helicopter crashes caused from the downward flow of air. The construction of this in the frigid conditions of Siberia must have been grueling and downright cruel. Sources state that the machinery used at this mine had to be covered at night or it would freeze Are the diamonds worth freezing to death?! It’s unoperational today but Some claim that there’s still a bunch of diamonds in this mine and the whole thing could be worth about 12 Billion dollars. It’s possible that controlling this diamond is mine is crucial to controlling the price of diamonds across the world. Bingham Copper Mine The bingham copper mine located near Salt Lake City Utah is home to the biggest pit in the world and it’s been in operation since 1903. It’s about 2.5 miles wide and if it were a stadium, it would be able to fit an estimated 9.5 million people. It keeps getting bigger and bigger too! Diligent workers can move about 250,000 tons of rock each day and it’s even become a tourist attraction in recent years before a massive landslide took place. Some claim that this was the biggest non volcanic landslide to take place in North American modern history. This photo we see here shows you the aftermath of this massive landslide and Bingham Copper mine and it makes you wonder how safe some of the conditions at these mines truly are. The landslides were so massive, that they actually triggered a few small earthquakes! Experts estimated that 165 tons of earth slide down from the top of the mine all the way to the bottom.
Views: 271706 American Eye
Uranium Mining in US and Canada in the 1970s
 
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Physically removing the rock ore generally involves either open-pit mining or underground mining. Milling is the process that removes uranium from the ore, which is mostly obtained in open-pit and underground mines. Once at the mill, the ore is crushed and ground up, and treated with chemical solutions to dissolve the uranium, which is then recovered from the solution. Tailings are the wastes from the millings processes and are stored in mill tailings impoundments, a specially designed waste disposal facility. Since 1979, when uranium mine workers began being diagnosed with lung diseases, such as cancer, regulators have gradually tightened controls and mandated improved uranium mining practices. Recently, officials also have become concerned with the broader impacts of uranium mining on public health and the environment. Workers are directly exposed to the radiation hazards of uranium mines. Uranium mining also releases radon from the ground into the atmosphere. Mines and mining waste can release radionuclides, including radon, and other pollutants to streams, springs, and other bodies of water. Federal and state agencies have established pollutant discharge limits and drinking water standards, and continue to monitor these sites for public safety. Uranium mine waste from operations that closed before the mid-1970s are of particular concern. In many cases, these mines remain unclaimed and the waste is still piled near the mine. Weathering can lead to radioactive dust that is blown by the wind and the seepage of contaminants into the surface and groundwater. There are also cases of unclaimed uranium mine waste being used for house construction, which creates significant radon and radiation hazard for inhabitants. For more information on the hazards of uranium, go to USEPA website http://www.epa.gov/radtown/basic.html . This is clipped from the late 1970's BBC Production, Energy From The Crust, showing uranium mining activities and equipment and including footage from the following uranium mines: Schwartzwalder Mine, Near Boulder, Colorado King Solomon Mine near Uravan, Colorado and the Key Lake Mine in Saskatchewan, Canada. The entire film is available at the Internet Archive.
Views: 18522 markdcatlin
Dirty Business: How Mining Made Australia - Full Documentary
 
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Millions trust Grammarly's free writing app to make their messages, documents, and posts clear, mistake-free, and effective. Sign up today. It's free! https://bit.ly/2F5Fuey Dirty Business: How Mining Made Australia is the history of Australian mining. It portrays how over the last 150 years mining has made Australia rich, yet created an unending struggle over who shares in the wealth. It reveals how mining helped forge democracy yet has repeatedly plotted to influence politics and even overthrow democratically elected leaders. Whilst mining has also been deeply damaging to Aboriginal society, ironically in the 21st century, it may be aboriginal people's best hope of economic self-determination.
Views: 98512 Sterling Documentaries
Mining Battles: Uranium, Coal, and Gold
 
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Find more Earth Focus content at https://www.linktv.org/earthfocus (Earth Focus: Episode 67) An impoverished former mining community in Colorado hopes that a proposed uranium mill will bring jobs and prosperity until environmentalists step in to try to stop it. Who gets to decide? Filmmaker Suzan Beraza documents the debate in her new film Uranium Drive-In. Rhinos are killed for their horn. But now in South Africa they face a new threat -- coal. Plans for an open cast coal mine on the border of Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park, home to the largest population in the world of the once endangered white rhino, may bring economic development. However, these plans will also worsen air and water quality and increase poaching and crime. Jeff Barbee reports from South Africa. The indigenous people in Ecuador's Kimsakocha wetlands rely on the land's water for their livelihood -- agriculture and livestock production. But there is gold under the water and foreign mining companies are out to get it. The local people mount a fierce opposition. "Resistance will not end, we will not give up even if we are in prison," says local community leader Carlos Perez. Constantino de Miguel reports from Ecuador.
Views: 4426 Link TV
Exploring an Abandoned Uranium Mine - AZ
 
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More videos on TUC Extras Channel: http://youtube.com/theunknowncamextras https://www.facebook.com/TheUnknownCameraman/ http://www.twitter.com/TheUnknownCam
Views: 147106 TheUnknownCameraman
In Situ Mining Process
 
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A brief overview of the In Situ mining process at our Cameco Resources locations.
Views: 8298 CamecoCorporation
The Midnite Uranium Mine
 
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The Midnite Uranium Mine on the Spokane Indian Reservation is an open pit mine that has been left open with exposed radioactive ore throughout the site since 1981.
Views: 5156 jfergusonphotos
India's first uranium mine: located in the state of Jharkhand becomes a dark matter laboratory.
 
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India's first uranium mine: located in the state of Jharkhand becomes a dark matter laboratory. India's first uranium mine, the Jaduguda mine in Jharkhand state, now houses a laboratory for experiments in fundamental physics. The Underground Scientific Laboratory of Jaduguda 550, built in a cave of 37 square meters buried at 905 meters and previously used for storage, will focus on the search for dark matter. It was built by the Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics and is expected to bring together the country's brightest experimental scientists interested in cutting-edge research. Reusing the cave at the 50-year mine run by the Uranium Corporation of India required an initial investment of $ 32,000. Scientists considered this to be the best place to install a low temperature cesium iodide detector because its depth would protect the device from other particles. The site's uranium deposits, which produce 25 percent of the raw materials needed to feed India's nuclear reactors, are located about 300 meters from the laboratory. Therefore, physicists working there are not concerned about background radiation.
Views: 7576 Science and more
Touring Australia : Uranium mine : Mary Kathleen
 
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A quick look at the old uranium mine at Mary Kathleen between Mt Isa and Cloncurry. The water looks great but numerous signs suggest that swimming may have unwanted consequences in fact numerous signs suggest not going anywhere near the place......what the hell, I'm already on the wrong side of 60.
Views: 3213 Rod Williams
Cameco Corporation – Uranium Production and Opportunities in Northern Saskatchewan
 
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Tim Gitzel, President & CEO of Cameco: Northern Saskatchewan has the world’s best uranium assets – one of the reasons Cameco opened a new mine here in 2014.
Views: 1379 ThinkSask
South Terras Mine in Cornwall. Radioactive contamination
 
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The radioactive legacy left behind from uranium mining 83 years ago is still present although not visible with the naked eye.
Views: 4128 Mark Thomas
Part 7 - Tech & Types of Uranium Mining
 
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Tech & Types of Uranium Mining
Views: 578 NoGlow1
Today's American Policies of Genocide: Uranium Mining on Indigenous land.
 
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We hear a lot about toxic water in Flint, Michigan which has has been happening in Native communities as well. No clean drinking water [environmental racism] for the Lakota people? A perfect example of American policies of genocide of the Indigenous people of the US today. Watch FULL DOC: youtube.com/watch?v=JusBAxa40Bc Follow us @ https://www.facebook.com/iloveancestry https://twitter.com/LovingAncestry http://iloveancestry.tumblr.com http://pinterest.com/iloveancestry http://www.instagram.com/iloveancestry https://www.google.com/+iloveancestry REALITY CHECK! There is more than 3000 abandoned open pit uranium mines on the land of the Great Sioux Nation for 40 years. Winona LaDuke wrote an article in 1992 mentioning that President Nixon declared a National Sacrifice Area to Radiation for the treaty territory of the Great Sioux Nation and the Navajo. A Perfect Example of Today's American Policies of Genocide! Short video clip from Red Cry documentary film: Red Cry is an original, feature-length documentary film chronicling the lives of Lakota Elders and Oyate in the face of ongoing genocide against the Lakota by government and corporate interests. I Love Ancestry exists to empower people to seek knowledge of ancestral heritage, preserve historical truth, and unite like-minded people. At I Love Ancestry, we envision a world where people embrace their own and each other's roots, celebrate diversity, and advocate for indigenous cultures. Our Website: http://iloveancestry.com
Views: 1263 I Love Ancestry
Uranium Mining Impact in Canada
 
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Part of a groupe called «Committee for Futur Generations», Candyce and Marius Paul live in northern Saskatchewan. They share with us what Uranium mining industry as done to their community and their workers for the last 40 years. http://committeeforfuturegenerations.wordpress.com Links: Thomas, P., J. Irvine, J. Lyster, and R. Beaulieu. 2005. Radionuclides and trace metals in Canadian moose near uranium mines: comparison of radiation doses and food chain transfer with cattle and caribou. Health Physics 88: 423-438. http://www.usask.ca/toxicology/people/faculty/patricia-thomas.php Community Vitality Monitoring Partnership http://www.cvmpp.ca/ Candyce Paul at the Uranium Hearings with CNSC LaRonge. Oct., 2013 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RYhYfYMZtjo Kirstin Scansen at the Uranium Hearings with CNSC LaRonge. Oct., 2013 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G3KLp8sHXu0 Committee for Future Generations at CNSC Hearings LaRonge, 2013 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ksmZUn1q9w En prévision de audiences du BAPE sur l'industrie minière de l'uranium au Québec début septembre, écoutons ce que les gens du nord de la Saskatchewan ont à dire sur les mines d'uranium, eux qui vivent avec ses mines depuis 40 ans. http://committeeforfuturegenerations.wordpress.com
Views: 2395 Philippe H. Bouchard
How Coal Is Mined and Refined - Top Coal Mining Spots in the World - Documentaries
 
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How Coal Is Mined and Refined - Top Coal Mining Spots in the World - Documentaries. Welcome to DOCUMENTARIES - home of the best documentary movies and documentary films. Coal mining is the process of extracting coal from the ground. Coal is valued for its energy content, and, since the 1880s, has been widely used to generate electricity. Steel and cement industries use coal as a fuel for extraction of iron from iron ore and for cement production. In the United Kingdom and South Africa, a coal mine and its structures are a colliery, a coal mine a pit, and the above-ground structures the pit head. In Australia, "colliery" generally refers to an underground coal mine. In the United States, "colliery" has been used to describe a coal mine operation but nowadays the word is not commonly used. Coal mining has had many developments over the recent years, from the early days of men tunnelling, digging and manually extracting the coal on carts, to large open cut and long wall mines. Mining at this scale requires the use of draglines, trucks, conveyors, hydraulic jacks and shearers. Read More About "How Coal Is Mined and Refined - Top Coal Mining Spots in the World - Documentaries" - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coal_mining Subscribe to Documentaries to be the first to receive updates - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQtbnPVhfIsKCzbVOHk_WEg Join us in our documentaries community discussion by following us in our documentaries Google+ community discussion - https://aboutme.google.com/u/0/b/116952488485458973611 Thanks for watching DOCUMENTARIES - home of the best documentary movies and documentary films. #Documentaries #YouTubeMovies #DocumentaryMovies #Education #Entertainment Thanks for watching "How Coal Is Mined and Refined - Top Coal Mining Spots in the World - Documentaries"
Views: 12034 Documentaries
The Uranium Extraction Process - Educational 3D Animated Video
 
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The Uranium Extraction Process - Educational 3D Animated Video For more information and to request a FREE estimate, contact us today: Website: http://www.imaker.ca Email: [email protected] United States Call: +1-800-212-8840 International Clients: +1-604-675-6999
The Lizard's Revenge
 
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Recently BHP Billiton announced it proposed to expand the Olympic Dam Uranium Mine to become the largest open pit mine in the world. Traditional owner Uncle Kevin Buzzacott and activist/musician Izzy Brown are organizing an event called the Lizard's Revenge to encourage people protest the expansion. This is an interview with Izzy about the planned action, the history of protests against the mine and the problem of uranium mining. Music and additional footage from Eathdream 2000 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6AjshqIrpA8
Views: 2391 Linda Rose
Special Report from the Occupied Forest: Meet Activists Fighting Europe’s Largest Open-Pit Coal Mine
 
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https://democracynow.org - Reporting from COP23 in Bonn, Germany, Democracy Now! travels to the nearby blockade of the Hambach coal mine, the largest open-pit coal mine in Europe. Activists say the mine extracts an extremely dirty form of coal called lignite, also known as brown coal, which causes the highest CO2 emissions of any type of coal when burned. For more than five years, they have been fighting to shut down the mine and to save the remaining forest from being cut down to make way for the expanding project. Only 10 percent of the ancient forest remains. Democracy Now! is an independent global news hour that airs weekdays on nearly 1,400 TV and radio stations Monday through Friday. Watch our livestream 8-9AM ET: https://democracynow.org Please consider supporting independent media by making a donation to Democracy Now! today: https://democracynow.org/donate FOLLOW DEMOCRACY NOW! ONLINE: Facebook: http://facebook.com/democracynow Twitter: https://twitter.com/democracynow YouTube: http://youtube.com/democracynow SoundCloud: http://soundcloud.com/democracynow Daily Email: https://democracynow.org/subscribe Google+: https://plus.google.com/+DemocracyNow Instagram: http://instagram.com/democracynow Tumblr: http://democracynow.tumblr.com Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/democracynow iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/podcast/democracy-now!-audio/id73802554 TuneIn: http://tunein.com/radio/Democracy-Now-p90/ Stitcher Radio: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/democracy-now
Views: 13499 Democracy Now!
"U" trailer Reframe Film Festival.mov
 
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"U" - A Story About Uranium and Us will be screened at the Reframe Peterborough International Film Festival on January 31st at 4 :00 p.m. at the Showplace Performance Centre 290 George Street S. It is a true story of our move to Haliburton County in search of a cleaner lifestyle and to get away from the Pickering Nuclear Station only to find to our horror that we had moved around the corner from a potential open pit uranium mine. This film came about to tell the public what mining companies and the government leave out about the dangers of mining uranium and nuclear energy to all of us through filming our communities real life experiences. This is a real life version of the terrible reality and legacy of mining uranium and nuclear energy in Canada.
Views: 175 earthdance11
Abandoned Sherwood Mine
 
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The Sherwood disposal site is a former uranium-ore processing site operated by Western Nuclear, Inc. The site is in Stevens County near the town of Wellpinit, in eastern Washington on the Spokane Indian Reservation, about 35 miles northwest of the city of Spokane. Western Nuclear used an acid-leach process to extract uranium from ore hauled from an open pit mine 0.5 mile from the mill. The capacity of the mill was about 2,100 tons of ore per day. Milling operations began in 1978, and the mill closed in 1984 because of a decline in the uranium market. The historical mission of the mill was to provide uranium concentrate exclusively to private industry. Mill decommissioning began in 1992, and all cleanup and reclamation activities were completed by 1996. Milling operations produced radioactive tailings, a predominantly sandy material. The tailings, along with mill site soils, building equipment, and debris contaminated with tailings and low-level radioactivity, were encapsulated in an engineered disposal cell constructed on the mill site. The acid-leached tailings were neutralized with lime before disposal. The disposal cell contains about 2.9 million tons (2.4 million cubic yards) of uranium mill tailings and an additional 350,000 cubic yards of contaminated mill site materials with a total activity of 470 curies of radium-226.
Views: 25 A. P.
¡Enough Already! Open-pit metal mining and radioactive minerals exploitation
 
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Enough Already!! Open-pit metal mining and radioactive minerals exploitation
Mining on the Swell
 
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Utah's San Rafael Swell in Emery County is home to many abandoned uranium mines that are an important part of America's history. The Hidden Splendor, Copper Globe, Muddy Creek, Tomsich Butte, Little Susan, and Lucky Strike are mining areas that were highlighted in an oral history project conducted in 2011 by the Utah Abandoned Mine Reclamation Program in partnership with the BLM and Emery County. People who were intimately involved in the uranium mining effort talk about their experiences and life as they knew it when they worked at the mines. For more visit our Mining History page: http://linux3.ogm.utah.gov/WebStuff/wwwroot/amr/miningHistory.html
Views: 3129 Utah DOGM
Open Pit
 
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Feature documentary Open Pit is a tour de force of investigative journalism and guerilla filmmaking that reveals the vicious face of "dirty gold" in Peru. A film by Gianni Converso. Produced by Daniel Santana and Gianni Converso. In the heart of Cajamarca, Newmont Mining Corporation operates the Yanacocha Gold Mine, one of the largest Open Pit mining operations in the world. Using the cyanide leach process, Newmont Mining has come to define "dirty gold" for a generation of Campecinos -- the indigenous people who have lived at the top of the Peruvian Andes since the Inca civilization.
Views: 41474 OpenPitDocumentary
Cameco McArthur River Virtual Tour
 
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Watch this virtual tour from Cameco to learn about McArthur River, the world's largest high-grade uranium mine. Located in northern Saskatchewan, ore grades within the deposit are 100 times the world average, which means the operation can produce more than 18 million pounds of uranium each year by mining only 150 to 200 tonnes of ore per day.
Views: 10496 CamecoCorporation
MINING IN NUNAVUT/ URANIUM MINING IN CANADIAN ARCTIC
 
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"People Can Stand Up" What do you think of mining in the Canadian Arctic?? The Inuit organizations of Nunavut have recently opened the way to uranium mining. Some Nunavut residents want to voice their concerns and created a grassroots organization to ask for a public inquiry; should Nunavut open the way to nuclear energy or not? "Show Me On The Map: Discussions on Mining on Aboriginal Lands" is an online blog discussing the social, economic, and environmental issues surrounding mining in the Canadian Arctic. Visit http://www.isuma.tv/hi/en/showmeonthemap to hear the concerns of those living in these communities relating to future mining prospects. Visit www.isuma.tv for over 2,600 videos in more than 46 languages, dedicated to Indigenous media from around the world.
Views: 5706 IsumaTV
OPEN PIT MINING OF COPPER IN THE AMERICAN SOUTHWEST 1960s MOVIE  57284
 
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Produced by the Marion Power Shovel Company, this fascinating movie looks at copper and copper mining in the 1960s, when the American mines were at peak production and financial troubles loomed. The film looks at the future of mining, including the development of efficiencies to keep mines in business. Open pit mining techniques are shown, with a focus on the Southwest. At 2:00, Bingham Canyon and the Utah Mining Company pit (also known as the Kennecott Copper Mine) is seen. At 2:40, various open pit mines are seen which use either trucks or trains to remove ore. Although they are not named, it's likely that one of them is the Phelps-Dodge mine at Bisbee, Arizona. At 5:40, exploratory core drilling is shown. At 6:30, exploration programs are shown including at 6:43, an engineering team that maps mine development. Various drill systems are seen at 9:00, including the rotary drill. At 10:30, preparations are seen towards using explosives with the burying of dynamite and detonators for excavation. At 12:12, loading of explosives is seen with an emphasis on safe handling. At 14:51, a cage drill is shown in use allowing rocks to be drilled in the field (without being moved by shovels) for explosive removal. At 16:00, a small 4.5 yard bucket shovel is shown being used to move blast debris. At 16:00, a 6-yard loading shovel is seen. At 17:49, overburden waste from the pit is loaded on a train so that it can be moved and dumped at a remote area. At 18:50, a 13-yard shovel is seen in use with a large truck also in use. As the narrator explains, these large size equipment is needed to lower unit costs of copper, and are an economic necessity given the modern financial conditions. At 19:52, the motorized wheel principle of new types of mining trucks is seen, and the narrator comments that next generation trucks will carry over 100 tons of ore. At 22:55, a grader is seen working the mine roads, and the narrator comments about how tires wear out so quickly on the job that they account for up to 1% of mining costs. At 24:30, railroad trains are shown on the move at a mine, moving 60-125 ton per car loads. The narrator comments further on the use of railroads in pit mining. At 26:30, a large shovel is seen loading a train, sprinkling the loads with water to hold down dust. The large boulders in the loads make this type of work dangerous. At 27:16, ore loads are dumped into a crusher at a mill site. At 27:40, a rail waste dump into a slag pile is seen. At 28:00, a train-based grader is used to clear tracks of debris. The narrator notes that the mining railroads are some of the busiest in the USA and the world. At 28:44, new tracks are installed due to various demands, and mechanized railroad ballast systems are used for fast track installation. At 31:20, a skip hoist is seen being used to take ore from a deep, small pit to the surface. At 32:50, a series of leeching ponds is seen, with water percolated through the ponds to precipitate copper. At 34:00, a machine shop is seen at the mine, providing repair and maintenance services at the mine. At 35:40, a heavy repair part is unloaded at the mine using a power shovel. At 36:00, a research laboratory is seen at work, developing new uses of copper in the atomic and other industries. At 36:40, the IBM Ramac computer is seen. The IBM 305 RAMAC was the first commercial computer that used a moving-head hard disk drive (magnetic disk storage) for secondary storage. The film ends with a shot of a heap of pennies, with the narrator noting that the industry is working hard to expand production to fulfill future needs. The Bingham Canyon Mine, more commonly known as Kennecott Copper Mine, is extracting a large porphyry copper deposit southwest of Salt Lake City, Utah, in the Oquirrh Mountains. The mine is the largest man-made excavation in the world and produced more copper than any other mine in history – more than 19 million tons. The mine has been in production since 1906, and has resulted in the creation of a pit over 0.6 miles (970 m) deep, 2.5 miles (4 km) wide, and covering 1,900 acres (770 ha). Marion Power Shovel Company was an American firm that designed, manufactured and sold steam shovels, power shovels, blast hole drills, excavators, and dragline excavators. The company was a major supplier of shovels for the construction of the Panama Canal. Founded in Marion, Ohio in August, 1884 as the Marion Steam Shovel Company, the company grew through sales and acquisitions throughout the 20th century. The company changed its name to Marion Power Shovel Company in 1946 to reflect the industry's change from steam power to diesel power. This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD, 2k and 4k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 5522 PeriscopeFilm
Heap Leaching Video
 
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A video interview with Monash University's Dr. Gavin Mudd about the proposed heap leaching expansion of Ranger Uranium Mine in Kakadu National Park.
Views: 26055 NT Environment Centre
How Did Nuclear Power Come To Dominate US Energy Leaving 15,000 Abandoned Uranium Mines (Pt. 1)
 
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The following news piece represents the first in a 15 part mini-series titled, Nuclear Power in Our World Today, featuring nuclear authority and world expert, nuclear engineer and whistleblower Arnie Gundersen of Fairewinds Energy. The EnviroNews USA special encompasses a wide span of topics, ranging from Manhattan-era madness to the continuously unfolding crisis on the ground at Fukushima Daiichi in eastern Japan. Our journey extends outward from a bombshell interview conducted by EnviroNews Editor-in-Chief Emerson Urry, with the esteemed nuclear expert, whistleblower, and expert witness Arnie Gundersen. Gundersen is a nuclear engineer, as well as a former power plant operator, and trade executive, whose own life, for a good amount of time, was ruined by the nuclear industry after he exposed radioactive safety violations. So to get this series rolling, here’s what Gundersen revealed to Emerson Urry. We were talking about Fukushima and obviously the myriad isotopes that are put off as a byproduct of the nuclear fission that is happening in the reactor. It all starts there with the uranium, and there was quite a rush for that, and now we have all of these situations. To our understanding there are about 15,000 abandoned uranium mines that have been left in complete ruin with very little cleanup or remediation at all, just in the western United States. This has happened, by-and-large, because of an antiquated mining bill – the 1872 Mining Bill. Gundersen: I’ll give you another example of the same thing, and I would say “yes” to everything you said is the quick answer. There is a mill-tailings site in Moab, Utah. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission told the owner of the site that they needed to set aside six million dollars to clean it up. Well, the actual cleanup is a billion dollars. What did the owner do? They declared bankruptcy and walked away. Urry: And it wasn’t bonded? No bond? Gundersen: Right. It wasn’t bonded. You know, if you bonded uranium mining, you wouldn’t have uranium mining. Urry: Because nobody would probably… Gundersen: The way our system is set up is that you take the profit early, and then when everything is done you walk away and the government takes the risk. So, we’ve socialized the risk, and the capitalists make the profit early on and the rest of us pick up the cost afterward. And that’s historically true on the Navajo reservation especially – but you get in the Black Hills and the Lakota Sioux… When Gundersen said the brunt of these mines are on Native American lands, he wasn’t kidding. All of these are abandoned open-pit uranium mines. 397 in Montana, 2103 in Wyoming, 113 in North Dakota, 272 in South Dakota, and 387 in northern Colorado, for a total of 3272. This is an abandoned open-pit uranium mine on the southwestern edge of the Black Hills. The thing about the Darrow Pits Mine is that they are only 40 miles from Mt. Rushmore. Millions of tourists travel to Mt. Rushmore every year not knowing that they are breathing in radioactive dust, and the water that they drink in the motels in Rapid City contains uranium. Recently, March 2013, the U.S. Forest Service finally issued a public safety closure order because of the dangers to human health. Among the particles that are in there are arsenic, molybdenum, thorium, radium and uranium. These are all in the form of dust or runoff, and they are picked up by the wind. Our levels were very very high compared to Chernobyl. The radiation levels in parts I visited with my students were higher than those in the evacuated zones around the Fukushima nuclear disaster.” Higher. Fukushima radiation levels were higher than Chernobyl. The Northern Great Plains’ levels are higher than Fukushima — and these are not from nuclear power plants or from an atomic weapon, or atomic bomb being exploded. These are from 2,885 abandoned open-pit uranium mines and prospects, and we are subject to that radioactive pollution constantly. All of these abandoned open-pit uranium mines in the Northern Great Plains are affecting everyone, but they are genocide for the Great Sioux Nation — for my people. This is genocide. Contact your congressman, your senators. Ask them to pass a bill to clean up all the abandoned uranium mines in all of the United States. SEE more info at: http://www.fairewinds.org/ "Demystifying Nuclear Power Through Education". SEE Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/fairewindsenergy Source: http://environews.tv/031116-031016-pt-1-the-dirty-deadly-frontend-of-nuclear-power-15000-abandoned-uranium-mines/#comments at EnviroNews.com • Category o Nonprofits & Activism • License o Creative Commons Attribution license (reuse allowed) • o Remix this video I created this video with the YouTube Video Editor (https://www.youtube.com/editor)
Views: 50 sherri99516
Mawson Resources BREAKING NEWS LaHaba Uranium Mine -- Spain
 
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This announcement, at the end of June 2007, from Mawson Resources. The final permit to reopen the La Haba open pit uranium mine in Spain has been granted. This video from Mining Interactive Corp. has John Pifer interviewing Michael Hudson, Chief Excecutive Officer and President of Mawson Resources. For more information go to the site mininginteractive.com.
Views: 488 mininginteractive
Digging to a Better Future
 
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This video is a submission for the SMA Digging Deeper Challenge that asks, "What will Saskatchewan mining look like in the next 50 years?". This is the bibliography of references: (2013, June 14). “Are We Running out of Minerals?” Retrieved March 10, 2015, from http://www.miningfacts.org/Blog/Mining-News/Are-We-Running-out-of-Minerals-/ Fulp, M. (2012, March 19). “Has the earth ever run out of a natural resource?” | MINING.com. Retrieved March 10, 2015, from http://www.mining.com/has-the-earth-ever-run-out-of-a-natural-resource/ Spoon, Marianne. "How Uranium Mining Works" 15 November 2011. HowStuffWorks.com. Retrieved March 10, 2015 from http://science.howstuffworks.com/uranium-mining.htm Dobra, J. Ulma-Scholle, Dana. "Uranium — How Is It Mined?" Uranium: How Is It Mined? Web. 10 March 2015. https://geoinfo.nmt.edu/resources/uranium/mining.html. World Nuclear Association. Uranium Mining Overview. 1 May 2012. Web. 10 March 2015. http://www.world-nuclear.org/info/nuclear-fuel-cycle/mining-of-uranium/uranium-mining-overview/ Photo Mine, Open Pit Mining - Free Image on Pixabay. (n.d.). Retrieved March 10, 2015, from http://pixabay.com/en/mine-open-pit-mining-492412/ Saskatchewan Mining Association Resources 4 Teachers. (n.d.). Retrieved March 10, 2015, from http://www.saskmininged.com/
Views: 66 Caswell SAGE
Climate change protesters break through police coal mine cordon in Germany
 
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Thousands of people joined climate change protests near one of Germany's biggest lignite coal mines Saturday. Police deployed hundreds of officers in and around the western German village of Hochneukirch to prevent demonstrators from blocking open-pit mine and adjacent power plants. RT LIVE https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IFAcqaNzNSc Check out http://rt.com Subscribe to RT! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=RussiaToday Like us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/RTnews Follow us on VK https://vk.com/rt_international Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/RT_com Follow us on Instagram http://instagram.com/rt Follow us on Google+ http://plus.google.com/+RT Follow us on Soundcloud https://soundcloud.com/rttv #RT (Russia Today) is a global #news network broadcasting from Moscow and Washington studios. RT is the first news channel to break the 1 billion YouTube views benchmark.
Views: 9696 RT
open pit mining
 
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Mine-workers at Shiva Uranium mine uncertain about their future at the mine
 
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Hundreds of mine-workers at Shiva Uranium mine near Klerksdorp in the North West are uncertain about their futures at the mine. Seventy four percent of the mine is owned by the Gupta's troubled Johannesburg Stock Exchange listed company, Oakbay. The workers say part of the reason for their apprehension is a decision by the country's top-four banks, to close down all business accounts of the controversial family. For more News visit: http://www.sabc.co.za/news
Views: 625 SABC Digital News
America's Chernobyl
 
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Charmaine White Face of the Oglala Sioux Nation speaks about violations of the 1868 Fort Laramie Treaty, the 3,272 open pit abandoned uranium mines, and a nuclear free future.
Views: 219 orange ink
Gunnar Mine Headframe Blast
 
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The Gunnar Mine was a uranium mine in northern Saskatchewan located around 25 kilometres southwest of the community of Uranium City. The Gunnar deposit was discovered in July 1952 and operated as both an open pit (1955–1961) and underground (1957–1963) mine. Quantum Murray successfully demolished the Gunnar Mine on August 4, 2011. To learn more about demolition and decommissioning, please visit: www.quantummurray.com
Views: 707 QM Environmental
Cameco - Intro to Key Lake
 
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Key Lake operation is the world’s largest uranium mill. It was originally built to process two open-pit mines on the site and it now mills and packages all ore mined at McArthur River.
Views: 88 CamecoCorporation
ISR Mining
 
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Environmental Protection Regulation & Reclamation about ISR Mining
Views: 407 SignalEquities
The 'Mercenary Geologist' Mickey Fulp interviewed by Dominic Frisby about mining
 
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Subscribe to our newsletter at http://www.goldmoney.com/goldresearch. In this video podcast the GoldMoney Foundation's Dominic Frisby interviews Mickey Fulp, who is the "Mercenary Geologist". They talk about the good, the bad, and the ugly of mining companies. The certified geologist Fulp explains the criteria by which he determines how to value a mining company. Most importantly he looks at the type of deposits. For that he analyses the cost of production, the time line from discovery to production, as well as access to capital and possible exit strategies. Fulp's favourite deposits are open-pit heap leach oxide gold deposits, copper oxide deposits and ISR or open-pit heap leach uranium deposits, as these meet all his important criteria. To the list of bad deposits he counts polymetallic deposits and giant iron ore deposits. Fulp, who was one of the early birds in the rare earth market, sees good opportunities in graphite, which he calls the next rare earth. This video podcast was recorded on March 4 2012 at the PDAC Convention in Toronto, Canada.
Views: 1721 Goldmoney
WUS 2015 PLENARY 1 URANIUM MINING & THE NUCLEAR FUEL CHAIN: ISSUES & CONTROVERSIES
 
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MARIETTE LIEFFERINK (SOUTH-AFRICA) CEO of Federation for a Sustainable Environment IAN FAIRLIE (UK) Scientist, former advisor to UK government, now independent consultant on radiological risks HELEN MARY CALDICOTT (AUSTRALIA) Physician, cofounder of Physicians for Social Responsibility, well-known author on nuclear issues THE SYMPOSIUM The World Uranium Symposium will address issues arising from the nuclear fuel chain, from mining uranium to its end-uses and byproducts for civilian or military purposes. Both scientific and community-based, the Symposium is organized around the following themes: health, environment, economy, ethics, governance, human rights and the rights of indigenous peoples. Open to the public, the symposium had hosted more than 300 people per day from 14 to 16 April 2015, and had included local, national and international representatives from the sectors of health, research, industry, education, civil society, policy makers and indigenous communities. local, national and/or international media were present. All presentations of the symposium will be posted in electronic formats (text and / or videos) after the Symposium, in French and / or English. • April 14 (Day 1): Uranium mines and the nuclear life cycle : health and environmental issues • April 15 (Day 2): Civil and military nuclear : ethics, economics and political issues • April 16 (Day 3): Human rights, indigenous peoples' rights and governance issues ORGANIZATIONS INVOLVED The Symposium is jointly organized by Physicians for Global Survival (1985 Nobel Peace Prize), the Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment, Nature Québec, the Canadian Coalition for Nuclear Responsibility and the Coalition pour que le Québec ait meilleure mine. It also receives support from the International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War (Swiss chapter), the First Nations of Quebec and Labrador Sustainable Development Institute, the Cree Nation of Mistissini, MiningWatch Canada, and a number of other local, national and international partners. CONTEXT The Symposium is occurring at a time when many organizations and governments question the future ofnuclear power, currently providing about 11% of the world’s electricity. The year 2015 also marks the seventieth anniversary of the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and the corresponding United Nations negotiations of the Non Proliferation Treaty for the prevention and the abolition of nuclear arms. It will also see the tabling on a new UN treaty on climate change. Canada is one of the largest producers and exporters of uranium worldwide, yet its nuclear energy output is in relative decline. Only two provinces still operate nuclear reactors: Ontario and New Brunswick. While uranium has been primarily mined from Saskatchewan, the provinces of British Columbia and Nova Scotia have officially banned uranium mining. Quebec recently shut down its sole nuclear reactor and has tasked the Bureau d’audiences publiques sur l’environnement (BAPE) with conducting an investigation on issues related to uranium mining. It is expected to release its report by May 20 2015. The Symposium aims to tackle these different issues and to provide recommendations to decision makers to better ensure protection for the human health, global security and a safe environment
Views: 204 Uranium2015
PLENARY 3 Uranium Mining, Health & The Environment: Pulling it Together
 
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Summary of workshops with Jim Harding (facilitator) (Canada) Retired professor, University of Regina THE SYMPOSIUM The World Uranium Symposium addressed issues arising from the nuclear fuel chain, from mining uranium to its end-uses and byproducts for civilian or military purposes. Both scientific and community-based, the Symposium was organized around the following themes: health, environment, economy, ethics, governance, human rights and the rights of indigenous peoples. Open to the public, the symposium had hosted more than 300 people per day from 14 to 16 April 2015, and had included local, national and international representatives from the sectors of health, research, industry, education, civil society, policy makers and indigenous communities. local, national and/or international media were present. All presentations of the symposium will be posted in electronic formats (text and / or videos) after the Symposium, in French and / or English. • April 14 (Day 1): Uranium mines and the nuclear life cycle : health and environmental issues • April 15 (Day 2): Civil and military nuclear : ethics, economics and political issues • April 16 (Day 3): Human rights, indigenous peoples' rights and governance issues ORGANIZATIONS INVOLVED The Symposium is jointly organized by Physicians for Global Survival (1985 Nobel Peace Prize), the Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment, Nature Québec, the Canadian Coalition for Nuclear Responsibility and the Coalition pour que le Québec ait meilleure mine. It also receives support from the International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War (Swiss chapter), the First Nations of Quebec and Labrador Sustainable Development Institute, the Cree Nation of Mistissini, MiningWatch Canada, and a number of other local, national and international partners. CONTEXT The Symposium is occurring at a time when many organizations and governments question the future of nuclear power, currently providing about 11% of the world’s electricity. The year 2015 also marks the seventieth anniversary of the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and the corresponding United Nations negotiations of the Non Proliferation Treaty for the prevention and the abolition of nuclear arms. It will also see the tabling on a new UN treaty on climate change. Canada is one of the largest producers and exporters of uranium worldwide, yet its nuclear energy output is in relative decline. Only two provinces still operate nuclear reactors: Ontario and New Brunswick. While uranium has been primarily mined from Saskatchewan, the provinces of British Columbia and Nova Scotia have officially banned uranium mining. Quebec recently shut down its sole nuclear reactor and has tasked the Bureau d’audiences publiques sur l’environnement (BAPE) with conducting an investigation on issues related to uranium mining. It is expected to release its report by May 20 2015. The Symposium aims to tackle these different issues and to provide recommendations to decision makers to better ensure protection for the human health, global security and a safe environment
Views: 50 Uranium2015
The legacy of copper mining in Arizona
 
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Arizona produces more copper than any other state. This brief history shows how Arizona's copper mining built a state and changed a nation.
Views: 55050 Arizona Experience
Uranium Mines & Mills Throughout the World
 
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Uranium Mines & Mills Throughout the World
Views: 2109 Gregg Vickrey
Days of Revolt: Sacrifice Zones
 
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In this episode of Days of Revolt, Chris Hedges and two Native American activists discuss the violation of land and lives of Indigenous peoples, particularly the decades of open-pit uranium mining that is responsible for spreading nuclear contaminants across the continent today, Watch more on teleSUR http://www.telesurtv.net/english/index.html
Views: 8395 The Real News Network
Crying Out Loud For Love - Sharbot Lake Uranium Protest
 
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The standoff over uranium mining at Sharbot Lake just north of Kingston Ontario is not a conflict between "natives and non-natives"...the dispute is between the Indigenous landowners and the mining companies and their colonial government puppets. Natives and Non-Natives are joining together to ensure that the earth is not raped for uranium and that the future of ourselves and of our children are not left with a toxic dump. A mysterious private company called "Frontenac Ventures Corporation" FVC has been trespassing on our land so it can extract our resources. Frontenac is a "private" company that develops uranium properties in Canada. Their website has three paragraphs with no names, addresses, phone numbers or links for more information. It states they operated "four mines between 1957 to 1964 in that area which produced 15 million pounds of uranium from pegmatite ore". Open pit mining is one of their favourite methods. They presently have 400 claims for almost 8,000 hectares on Algonquin territory. They also have claims on property occupied by non-native cottagers who feel totally voiceless. According to their website Frontenac plans "to start aggressive exploration and development immediately". Frontenac's board is made up of: Dr. K. Sethu Raman, former Vice-President of "Campbell Chibougamau Mines" and "Royex Gold Group of Companies" (now "Barrrick Gold"); George White at 613-479-2936, the front man, former vice-president and general manager of "Westburne Industrial Enterprise Limited" that distributes oil and gas all the world. William J. Radvak is co-founder of "Response Biomedical Corporation" which develops and commercializes rapid "immunoassay diagnostic" tests; Anthony Deweth previously of the private banking sector of "CIBC Wood Gundy"; and Doris Meyer, former vice-president and financial officer of "Queenstake" which negotiated the acquisition of the "Jerritt Canyon Mine" in Nevada and other publicly traded mining companies. Her own company is "Golden Oak Corporate Services". Private corporations like Frontenac are not listed on the stock exchange. We cannot find out who the real owners are. They could be a front for secret investors. They appear to have something to hide. There is a legal separation between the private investors and the corporation. In this case it is almost impossible to pierce the corporate veil and get at the scoundrels who hide behind such corporations. Let's take that veil off. The Algonquins are sovereign and independent who never surrendered their lands. They are not part of Canada because they never agreed to join the colonial state and come under the "Indian Act". They remain independent under their own traditional law and the rules of international law apply. Write your members of parliament, the prime minister and the international community. Ask who has bought off the government and why? Is any amount of money gained in one lifetime worth jeopardizing the lives of humans for 10,000 years to come? Peace! The Wren
Views: 3674 TuathadaDanaan
Midnite Mine
 
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Midnite Mine is an inactive former uranium mine in the Selkirk Mountains of eastern Washington. Located within the reservation of the Spokane Tribe of Indians, the mine was operated from 1955 until 1981. Two open pits, backfilled pits, a number of waste rock piles, and several ore/protore stockpiles remain on site. In addition to elevated levels of radioactivity, heavy metals mobilized in acid mine drainage pose a potential threat to human health and the environment. The site drains to Blue Creek, which enters the Spokane Arm of Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake. Contaminated water emerging below the waste rock and ore piles is currently captured for treatment in an on-site treatment system. After a study of the site, EPA sought public comment on a proposed cleanup plan in September 2005. The final cleanup plan for the site is described in the Record of Decision issued September 29, 2006. The Record of Decision calls for a cap over an area of pits filled with waste during mining, consolidation and engineered containment of remaining waste in the two open pits, removal of water entering the pits, and operation of a treatment system to treat contaminated water from the pits and seeps.
Views: 18 A. P.
Uranium Exploration, Development, and Production - Denison Mines Corp.
 
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David Cates is the President and CEO of Denison Mines (TSX : DML), a uranium exploration and development company with interests focused in the Athabasca Basin region of northern Saskatchewan, Canada. For the best editorial on Junior Mining visit - http://www.cambridgehouse.com/mining Join us at an upcoming event! http://www.cambridgehouse.com Be part of our investment community: http://www.cambridgehouse.com/ https://twitter.com/cambridge https://www.facebook.com/cambridgehou... https://www.linkedin.com/company/camb... Copyright © 2019 Cambridge House International Inc. All rights reserved.
Exploring A Giant Soviet Mine Crucial To World War II
 
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Exploring abandoned mines can lead one to some interesting places and, I believe, this area of the former Soviet Union is a prime example of that. Rich in the history of the Second World War, scenic beauty, mining history, friendly people, unspoiled wilderness, unique sights… This area ranks high on the “interesting” scale for me. As I mentioned in the introduction, this abandoned mine and (almost) ghost town are located in southern Kazakhstan and go by the name of “Bayzhansay.” Although many Kazakh people were killed in WW2, the fighting did not reach this part of the world. Therefore, the lead mines of Bayzhansay were running flat out to supply the war effort. I can only imagine the intensity of activity taking place during that time, but I’m sure it would have been something to see… Of course, I probably would have been shot as a spy or sent to a gulag if I’d rolled up with my camera and started taking a video like I do now though. As the ninth largest country in the world, Kazakhstan has one of the lowest population densities on earth. And Bayzhansay is in a remote part of Kazakhstan… So, I wasn’t kidding when I said this was in the middle of nowhere. It took multiple days of driving for us to reach this mine. Also, bear in mind that even though Kazakhstan is the most developed of the ‘Stans, it is still complicated to fly here without spending a fortune. So, even though this abandoned mine and ghost town played such a role in World War II history, you won’t see it on any tourist routes. If you’re curious to see Bayzhansay on a map or a program like Google Earth, these are the GPS coordinates: 43.163189, 69.920683. For a sense of perspective, the precise location of the coordinates is where we parked above the mill to hike up to the large open pit. I can also provide you with the precise locations of the adits and tunnels of the underground sections of this mine shown in the upcoming videos as well if there is any interest... Based upon the research I had done on the size and significance of the town of Bayzhansay prior to visiting, I was shocked by its present state. Living in this town used to be considered a luxury and people used to come from all around for things like food and clothing. Among the ruins, there are a few people still scratching out an existence and there’s a mosque that gets a little paint once in a while to touch things up, but that’s it… I was told that no one stays for the winter as they would be completely cut off. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference. You can see the gear that I use for mine exploring here: https://bit.ly/2wqcBDD You can click here for my full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that colorful niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 19794 TVR Exploring