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Fossil Fuels vs Renewable Energy Sources
 
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-- Created using PowToon -- Free sign up at http://www.powtoon.com/join -- Create animated videos and animated presentations for free. PowToon is a free tool that allows you to develop cool animated clips and animated presentations for your website, office meeting, sales pitch, nonprofit fundraiser, product launch, video resume, or anything else you could use an animated explainer video. PowToon's animation templates help you create animated presentations and animated explainer videos from scratch. Anyone can produce awesome animations quickly with PowToon, without the cost or hassle other professional animation services require.
Views: 58816 Milind Amritkar
Can 100% renewable energy power the world? - Federico Rosei and Renzo Rosei
 
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Check out our Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/teded View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/can-100-renewable-energy-power-the-world-federico-rosei-and-renzo-rosei Every year, the world uses 35 billion barrels of oil. This massive scale of fossil fuel dependence pollutes the earth, and it won’t last forever. On the other hand, we have abundant sun, water and wind, which are all renewable energy sources. So why don’t we exchange our fossil fuel dependence for an existence based only on renewables? Federico Rosei and Renzo Rosei describe the challenges. Lesson by Federico Rosei and Renzo Rosei, directed by Giulia Martinelli. Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! David & Pamela Fialkoff, Miami Beach Family, Kostadin Mandulov, Kyoung-Rok Jang, Alex Schenkman, Hachik Masis Bagdatyan, Sdiep Sriram, Ivan Todorović, Antero Semi, Yanuar Ashari, Mrinalini , Anthony Kudolo, Scott Gass, Querida Owens, David Lucsanyi, Hazel Lam, Jhiya Brooks, Manav parmar, Dwight Tevuk , Stephen A. Wilson, Siamak H, Minh Tran, Dominik Kugelmann, Michel Reyes, Katie Winchester, Mary Sawyer, Ryan Mehendale, David Rosario, Samuel Doerle, Be Owusu, Susan Herder, Savannah Scheelings, Prasanth Mathialagan, Yanira Santamaria, Chad Harper, Dawn Jordan, Constantin Salagor, Activated Classroom Teaching, Kevin Wong, Umar Farooq, Goh Xiang Ting Diana, Mohammad Khory, Dmitry Neverov, Tushar Sharma, Mukamik, Cristóbal Medina Moenne, Silas Schwarz, Fabio Peters, MJ Tan Mingjie, Yansong Li, Jason A Saslow, Michael Aquilina, Joanne Luce, Ayaan Heban, Henry Li, Elias Wewel, Kyle Nguyen, Taylor Hunter, Noa Shore, Lex Azevedo, Merit Gamertsfelder, Bev Millar, Rishi Pasham, Jhuval, SookKwan Loong, Daniel Day, Nick Johnson.
Views: 566579 TED-Ed
Fossil Fuels 101
 
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Fossil fuel is a term used to describe a group of energy sources that were formed when ancient plants and organisms were subject to intense heat and pressure over millions of years. Learn more about the fossil fuels and all types of energy at www.studentenergy.org
Views: 585765 Student Energy
Renewable Energy Explained in 2 1/2 Minutes
 
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This is an unofficial explainer video I created for a college project. I decided to gear it toward TheSolutionsProject.org. The assets went from Adobe Illustrator to After Effects. This animation explains the different types of energy such as, fossil fuels, biomass, nuclear and renewables. Written, animated and illustrated by Dane Bliss Music by: Essa: https://soundcloud.com/essa-1 Voiceover by: Mike Porter: https://goo.gl/GNouYE Visit my online portfolio to see some more work at http://www.DaneBliss.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/DaneBlissDesign Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Dane-Bliss-Graphic-Design-813194572110628/timeline/ German translation by Robert Orzanna Twitter: https://twitter.com/orschiro
Views: 426011 Dane Bliss Design
GCSE Science Physics (9-1) Energy from fossil fuels
 
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You can easily find all the videos that you need on my website, along with other great revision resources. Check it out www.freesciencelessons.co.uk In this video, we look at how fossil fuels are used for energy. First we explore the advantages of using fossil fuels and then we look at the negative aspects.
Views: 46306 Freesciencelessons
Renewable Energy 101 | National Geographic
 
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There are many benefits to using renewable energy resources, but what is it exactly? From solar to wind, find out more about alternative energy, the fastest-growing source of energy in the world—and how we can use it to combat climate change. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta Select footage courtesy NASA https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/details.cgi?aid=11056 Renewable Energy 101 | National Geographic https://youtu.be/1kUE0BZtTRc National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo
Views: 300977 National Geographic
Renewable Energy Resources: Part 1 | GCSE Physics | Doodle Science
 
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Follow me!: https://twitter.com/DoodleSci Doodle Science teaches you high school physics in a less boring way in almost no time! Script: Renewable energy resources are being developed because we are running out of fossil fuels at an exponential rate. The wind is produced as a result of giant convection currents in the Earth's atmosphere, which are driven by heat energy from the sun. Wind turbines use the wind to drive turbines directly. The blades are connected to a housing, which contains gears linked to a generator. As the wind blows, it transfers some of its kinetic energy to the blades, which turn and drive the generator. The advantages are that there are no fuel costs and no harmful pollutant gases are produced. However, they depend on wind, if there is no wind, there's no electricity. Like the wind, water can be used to drive turbines directly. Wave machines use the kinetic energy in this movement to drive electricity generators. Another way of using the water is to build a tidal barrage over a river estuary to make use of the kinetic energy in the moving water. The barrage contains electricity generators, which are driven by the water rushing through tubes in the barrage. Hydroelectric power stations are dams built across a river valley. The water high up behind the dam contains gravitational potential energy. This is transferred to kinetic energy as the water rushes down through tubes inside the dam. The moving water drives electrical generators, which may be built inside the dam. Water produced energy is good because no harmful polluting gases are produced and tidal barrages and hydroelectric power stations are very reliable and can be easily switched on. However, tidal barrages destroy the habitat of estuary species and hydroelectricity dams flood farmland and push people from their homes.
Views: 104609 DoodleScience
Non-Renewable Energy Resources | GCSE Physics | Doodle Science
 
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Follow me!: https://twitter.com/DoodleSci Doodle Science teaches you high school physics in a less boring way in almost no time! Script: Fossil fuels are non-renewable energy resources; these are coal, oil and natural gas. They were formed from the remains of living organisms millions of years ago and they release heat energy when they are burned. This heat is used to turn water into steam, which is used to turn a turbine, which then drives a generator to generate electricity. There are downsides however, fossil fuels release sulphur dioxide and carbon dioxide which lead to acid rain and an increase in global warming. Another form of non-renewable energy is Nuclear. The main nuclear fuels are uranium and plutonium. The nuclei of these large atoms are split in a process called nuclear fission to release a great deal of heat. The heat energy is again used to boil water. The kinetic energy in the expanding steam spins turbines, which then drive generators to produce electricity. Unlike fossil fuels, nuclear fuels do not produce carbon or sulphur dioxide. However, they do have the risk of a fault where large amounts of radioactive material could be released into the environment such as the disaster of Chernobyl in 1986.
Views: 129199 DoodleScience
Different Sources of Energy, Using Energy Responsibly, Educational Video for Kids
 
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Learning about the different sources of energy. The difference between renewable and non-renewable energy sources. Learn ways to conserve energy right at home, and make a difference! Recommended for grades: 4 - 6. Kids Educ SUBSCRIBE TO US http://www.youtube.com/user/KidsEduc?sub_confirmation=1 To see the more kids movies go to http://www.youtube.com/user/KidsEduc
Fossil Fuels: The Greenest Energy
 
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To make earth cleaner, greener and safer, which energy sources should humanity rely on? Alex Epstein of the Center for Industrial Progress explains how modern societies have cleaned up our water, air and streets using the very energy sources you may not have expected--oil, coal and natural gas. Donate today to PragerU! http://l.prageru.com/2ylo1Yt Joining PragerU is free! Sign up now to get all our videos as soon as they're released. http://prageru.com/signup Download Pragerpedia on your iPhone or Android! Thousands of sources and facts at your fingertips. iPhone: http://l.prageru.com/2dlsnbG Android: http://l.prageru.com/2dlsS5e Join Prager United to get new swag every quarter, exclusive early access to our videos, and an annual TownHall phone call with Dennis Prager! http://l.prageru.com/2c9n6ys Join PragerU's text list to have these videos, free merchandise giveaways and breaking announcements sent directly to your phone! https://optin.mobiniti.com/prageru Do you shop on Amazon? Click https://smile.amazon.com and a percentage of every Amazon purchase will be donated to PragerU. Same great products. Same low price. Shopping made meaningful. VISIT PragerU! https://www.prageru.com FOLLOW us! Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/prageru Twitter: https://twitter.com/prageru Instagram: https://instagram.com/prageru/ PragerU is on Snapchat! JOIN PragerFORCE! For Students: http://l.prageru.com/29SgPaX JOIN our Educators Network! http://l.prageru.com/2c8vsff Script: What if I told you that someone had developed an energy source that could help us solve our biggest environmental challenges, purify our water and air, make our cities and homes more sanitary, and keep us safe from potential catastrophic climate change? What if I also told you that this energy source was cheap, plentiful, and reliable? Well, there is such a source. You probably know it as fossil fuel. Oil. Natural gas. Coal. But wait? Don’t fossil fuels pollute our environment and make our climate unlivable? That, of course, is what we’re told…and what our children are taught. But let’s look at the data. Here’s a graph you’ve probably never seen: the correlation between use of fossil fuels and access to clean water. More fossil fuel. More clean water. Am I saying the more we that we have used fossil fuel, the cleaner our water has become? Yes, that’s exactly what I’m saying. In the developed world, we take clean water for granted. We turn on a tap and it’s there. But getting it there takes a massive amount of energy. Think of the man-made reservoirs, the purification plants, the network of pipes. In the undeveloped world, it’s a much different story. They lack the energy, so they lack clean water. More fossil fuel. More clean water. The same is true of sanitation. By the use of cheap, plentiful, and reliable energy from fossil fuels, we have made our environment cleaner. Take a look at this graph. More fossil fuel. Better sanitation. Okay, what about air quality? Here’s a graph of the air pollution trends in the United States over the last half century based on data from the Environmental Protection Agency. Note the dramatic downward trend in emissions, even though we use more fossil fuel than ever. How was this achieved? Above all, by using anti-pollution technology powered by…fossil fuel: oil, natural gas and coal. But even without modern pollution control technology, fossil fuel makes our air cleaner. Indoor pollution—caused by burning a fire inside your house, cabin, hut or tent to cook and keep warm—was a deadly global problem until the late 19th century when cheap kerosene, a fossil fuel byproduct, became available in America and Europe. Indoor pollution is still a major issue in the developing world today. The best solution? Fossil fuel. And now we come to the biggest fossil fuel concern of all—global warming. On this very sensitive topic we need to get our terms straight: There is a big difference between mild global warming and catastrophic global warming. We can all agree on that, right? The issue isn’t: does burning fossil fuel have some warming impact? It does. The issue is: is the climate warming dangerously fast? In 1986 NASA climate scientist James Hansen—one of the world’s most prominent critics of the use of fossil fuels—predicted that “if current trends are unchanged,” temperatures would rise 2 to 4 degrees in the first decade of the 2000s. But as you can see from this graph, since 2000 the trend line is essentially flat—little or no warming in the last 15 years. That’s probably why we hear much less talk about “global warming” and much more talk about “climate change.” For the complete script, visit https://www.prageru.com/videos/fossil-fuels-greenest-energy
Views: 743429 PragerU
GCSE Science Physics (9-1) Renewable sources of energy
 
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You can easily find all the videos that you need on my website, along with other great revision resources. Check it out www.freesciencelessons.co.uk In this video, we look at the advantages and disadvantages of renewable sources of energy. We explore solar, wind and hydro and then move on to other sources such as geothermal, tidal, wave and biofuels.
Views: 59258 Freesciencelessons
If Green Energy Is So Great, Why Aren't We Using It?
 
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Green energy is getting better and cheaper, yet we still largely rely on fossil fuels. Why haven't we switched to solar and wind energy yet? Which Countries Will Be Underwater Due To Climate Change? - https://youtu.be/1ilC2ODaWSY Which Countries Run On 100% Renewable Energy? - https://youtu.be/SrmsQzRQPPw Sign Up For The Seeker Newsletter Here - http://bit.ly/1UO1PxI Read More: What Would Happen If We Burned All The Fossil Fuels On Earth? http://www.popsci.com/burning-all-fossil-fuels-could-raise-sea-levels-by-200-feet "A new study published today in Science Advances finds that if we burn all of the remaining fossil fuels on Earth, almost all of the ice in Antarctica will melt, potentially causing sea levels to rise by as much as 200 feet--enough to drown most major cities in the world." Who's Winning The Battle To Replace Coal? http://www.forbes.com/sites/thebakersinstitute/2016/05/17/whos-winning-the-battle-to-replace-coal/#e9dc97c6b09f "Coal is losing the battle for the electricity future in the United States. Investment in new coal-fired generating capacity has dried up with its share of electricity generation dropping from 53% in 2000 to 34% in 2015." Electricity in the United States http://www.eia.gov/energyexplained/index.cfm?page=electricity_in_the_United_States "In 2015, coal was used for about 33% of the 4 trillion kilowatthours of electricity generated in the United States. In addition to being burned to heat water for steam, natural gas can also be burned to produce hot combustion gases that pass directly through a natural gas turbine, spinning the turbine's blades to generate electricity." ____________________ DNews is dedicated to satisfying your curiosity and to bringing you mind-bending stories & perspectives you won't find anywhere else! New videos daily. Watch More DNews on Seeker http://www.seeker.com/show/dnews/ Subscribe now! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=dnewschannel Seeker on Twitter http://twitter.com/seeker Trace Dominguez on Twitter https://twitter.com/tracedominguez DNews on Facebook https://facebook.com/DiscoveryNews DNews on Google+ https://plus.google.com/u/0/+dnews Seeker http://www.seeker.com/ Sign Up For The Seeker Newsletter Here: http://bit.ly/1UO1PxI Special thanks to Julian Huguet for hosting and writing this episode of DNews! Check Julian out on Twitter: https://twitter.com/jhug00
Views: 345111 Seeker
Which Power Source Is Most Efficient?
 
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Australian researchers just unveiled the most efficient solar panels ever. How efficient are they, and what is the most efficient source of energy? Get 15% off http://www.domain.com's s domain names and web hosting when you use coupon code DNEWS at checkout! Read More: In world first -- UNSW researchers convert sunlight to electricity with over 40 percent efficiency http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2014-12/uons-iwf120514.php "UNSW Australia's solar researchers have converted over 40% of the sunlight hitting a solar system into electricity, the highest efficiency ever reported." New world record for solar cell efficiency at 46% French-German cooperation confirms competitive advantages of European photovoltaic industry http://www.ise.fraunhofer.de/en/press-and-media/press-releases/press-releases-2014/new-world-record-for-solar-cell-efficiency-at-46-percent "A new world record for the direct conversion of sunlight into electricity has been established." Australia develops world's most efficient solar panels http://rt.com/business/212383-australia-record-solar-energy/ "?Australian researchers have developed a new method of using commercial solar panels that converts more electricity from sunlight than ever before." What is the efficiency of different types of power plants? http://www.eia.gov/tools/faqs/faq.cfm?id=107&t=3 "One measure of the efficiency of a power plant that converts a fuel into heat and into electricity is the heat rate." Improving Efficiencies http://www.worldcoal.org/coal-the-environment/coal-use-the-environment/improving-efficiencies/ "Improving efficiency levels increases the amount of energy that can be extracted from a single unit of coal." The Most Common Electricity Sources in the U.S. http://pureenergies.com/us/blog/the-most-common-electricity-sources-in-the-u-s/ "Though renewable energy is growing fast, the U.S. still gets the vast majority of its power from conventional power plants." Increasing the Efficiency of Existing Coal-Fired Power Plants http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/R43343.pdf "Coal has long been the major fossil fuel used to produce electricity." Coal Will Survive as Efficient Power Plants Boost Demand http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-06-02/coal-seen-surving-as-efficient-power-plants-boost-demand.html "President Barack Obama's plan to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions left coal with a future even as the industry accuses him of trying to make the fuel obsolete." How Do Wind Turbines Work? http://energy.gov/eere/wind/how-do-wind-turbines-work "So how do wind turbines make electricity?" Screwy-looking wind turbine makes little noise and a big claim http://www.gizmag.com/the-archimedes-liam-f1-urban-wind-turbine/32263/ "Although it's getting increasingly common to see solar panels on the roofs of homes, household wind turbines are still a fairly rare sight." Betz's law http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Betz%27s_law Wind Energy More Energy Efficient than Fossil Fuels http://cleantechnica.com/2012/07/18/wind-energy-energy-efficient-fossil-fuels-uk/ "Here's something that may surprise you. Wind energy is more efficient than carbon-based fuels." Wind Energy's Shadow: Turbines Drag Down Power Potential http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/energy/2013/05/130516-wind-energy-shadow-effect/ "As seemingly limitless as the air that swirls around us, wind has proven to be the world's fastest-growing source of renewable energy." Advanced Nuclear Power Reactors http://www.world-nuclear.org/info/Nuclear-Fuel-Cycle/Power-Reactors/Advanced-Nuclear-Power-Reactors/ "The nuclear power industry has been developing and improving reactor technology for more than five decades and is starting to build the next generation of nuclear power reactors to fill new orders." Hydroelectric Power http://www.mpoweruk.com/hydro_power.htm "Hydro-electric power, using the potential energy of rivers, now supplies 17.5% of the world's electricity (99% in Norway, 57% in Canada, 55% in Switzerland, 40% in Sweden, 7% in USA)." Hydroelectric Power http://www.usbr.gov/power/edu/pamphlet.pdf "It's a form of energy ... a renewable resource." ____________________ DNews is dedicated to satisfying your curiosity and to bringing you mind-bending stories & perspectives you won't find anywhere else! New videos twice daily. Watch More DNews on TestTube http://testtube.com/dnews Subscribe now! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=dnewschannel DNews on Twitter http://twitter.com/dnews Trace Dominguez on Twitter https://twitter.com/tracedominguez Tara Long on Twitter https://twitter.com/TaraLongest DNews on Facebook https://facebook.com/DiscoveryNews DNews on Google+ http://gplus.to/dnews Discovery News http://discoverynews.com Download the TestTube App: http://testu.be/1ndmmMq
Views: 653988 Seeker
Top 10 Energy Sources of the Future
 
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These are ten most promising alternative energy sources of tomorrow. It’s a really exciting time to be alive. We have a front row seat to the only known transformation of a world powered by dirty fossil fuels, to a planet that gets its energy from renewable, clean sources. It’s happening just once, right now. Subscribe to TDC: https://www.youtube.com/TheDailyConversation Like our page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/thedailyconversation Join us on Google+ https://plus.google.com/100134925804523235350/posts Follow us on Twitter http://www.twitter.com/thedailyconvo 10. Space-based solar power http://energy.gov/articles/space-based-solar-power 9. Human Power http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/scientists-harness-human-power-electricity/ 8. Tidal Power http://www.renewablegreenenergypower.com/wave-energy-facts/ 7. Hydrogen (fuel cells) http://www.energyquest.ca.gov/story/chapter20.html http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrogen-powered_aircraft 6. Geothermal heat from underground lava beds http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geothermal_energy#Electricity https://theconversation.com/drilling-surprise-opens-door-to-volcano-powered-electricity-22515 5. Nuclear Waste http://nautil.us/issue/7/waste/our-nuclear-waste-is-a-goldmine http://gehitachiprism.com/ 4. Solar windows http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Growth_of_photovoltaics http://renewableresourcesinc.com/10-interesting-facts-about-solar-energy/#.VAtud2RdVB8 3. Bio-fuels (algae) http://cleantechnica.com/2014/08/20/alabama-gets-first-world-carbon-negative-algae-biofuel/ http://biofuel.org.uk/biofuel-facts.html 2. Flying wind farms http://newsoffice.mit.edu/2014/high-flying-turbine-produces-more-power-0515 http://www.eia.gov/tools/faqs/faq.cfm?id=427&t=3 1. Nuclear fusion http://www.americansecurityproject.org/10-key-facts-about-nuclear-fusion/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ITER#Timeline_and_current_status http://www.smartplanet.com/blog/bulletin/nuclear-fusion-from-google-lockheed-draper-fisher/ This video profiles the alternative energy sources of the future and the areas of energy development. Check out our recent series on the solutions to stop Global Warming: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PUAnR2PKHIs
Views: 1741293 The Daily Conversation
Non-renewable energy sources: Fossil fuels and Nuclear
 
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A explanation of fossil fuels and nuclear energy for AP Environmental Science students.
Views: 365 Lisa Bagley
Renewable Energy: It Uses Practically No Water Compared to Fossil Fuels
 
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The Energy Information Administration (EIA) recently highlighted a little-discussed benefit of using renewables like wind and solar to produce electricity: Unlike most power sources, they require “almost no water.” This is remarkable because thermoelectric power generation is the leading use of water in America. (That said, only three percent of power generation's 133 billion gallons a day of water is considered “consumptive use,” as the U.S. Geological Survey says, “meaning it is lost to evaporation or blowdown during generation.”) According to the latest U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) data from 2015, 41 percent of the water used in America is for power generation. The next highest use is irrigation for agriculture, accounting for 37 percent of U.S. water use (and close to two-thirds of that is consumptive). The Union of Concerned Scientists was raising this alarm in 2012 when the nonprofit created an infographic focused on the “energy-water collision,” which “refers to the range of issues that can crop up where our water resources and our power sector interact.” That can include increased competition for dwindling water sources and problems when the water going into or out of power plants is too warm. Why does producing electricity require so much water? As the Department of Energy (DOE) notes: “The main demand for water within a thermoelectric power plant is for condensing steam. Thermoelectric power generation typically converts the energy in a fuel source (fossil, nuclear, or biomass) to steam and then uses the steam to drive a turbine-generator.” This varies somewhat for natural gas, depending on the type of turbine. With many areas of the world, including large parts of America, already dealing with droughts and water shortages — problems expected to be exacerbated by climate change — the water intensity of power sources becomes another factor for local, state, and regional planners to consider. Coal’s Decline Brings Slight Progress The recent topline analysis from the EIA about water use for all energy sources in America is encouraging. Since 2014 the amount of water used to produce energy has been steadily declining. USGS data show this has been the trend since 2005: “The 2015 estimates put total withdrawals at the lowest level since before 1970, following the same overall trend of decreasing total withdrawals observed from 2005 to 2010.” Over a five year period from 2010 to 2015, water use for power generation dropped 18 percent. Much of this drop can be attributed to the decline in coal as a fuel source for electricity generation, as well as power plant closures and new plants implementing more water-efficient technologies. However, while the decline of the coal industry has meant power plants overall are using less water in the U.S., some of the power sources that are replacing coal, namely natural gas, are still highly dependent on water. While the natural gas industry’s claim that methane-rich gas is a cleaner “bridge fuel” to the future — an argument thoroughly debunked when accounting for globe-warming methane leaks in the supply chain — water use is another reason to consider wind and solar power over natural gas. Due to the various technologies used in natural gas power plants, some are more highly dependent on water than others. This variation makes it difficult to quantify just how much water natural gas power generation uses as a sector compared to coal. However, it is safe to say that natural gas power production uses less water than coal in general. Thus, the switch from coal to gas is contributing to the overal decline in water use for power generation, as the USGS and DOE say. As solar and wind become increasingly cost competitive with natural gas for electric power generation — especially in water-constrained areas of the country — they have the added advantage of being a water smart choice. Read more: https://www.desmogblog.com/2018/12/02/benefit-renewable-energy-uses-less-water-fossil-fuels Click here to subscribe to the DeSmog Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/DesmogBlog?sub_confirmation=1
Views: 46 DeSmog Blog
What Are Fossil Fuels? | National Geographic
 
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What are fossil fuels? How were they formed? Learn how human use of non-renewable energy sources, such coal, oil, and natural gas, affect climate change. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta What Are Fossil Fuels? | National Geographic https://youtu.be/YTnE0OQPTEo National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo
Views: 41853 National Geographic
Renewable Energy in Place of Fossil Fuels?
 
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Some day, perhaps, but not yet.
Views: 623 co2science
Importance of Renewable Energy -Types of Renewable Energy
 
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Importance of Renewable Energy -Types of Renewable Energy http://bit.ly/2Ng8DIl Importance of Renewable Energy and Types of Renewable Energy RENEWABLE ENERGY http://bit.ly/2Ng8DIl Renewable energies are sources of clean energy, inexhaustible and increasingly competitive. They differ from fossil fuels mainly in their diversity, abundance and potential for use anywhere on the planet, but above all because they do not produce greenhouse gases, which cause climate change, or pollutant emissions. Their costs are also declining and at a sustainable pace, while the overall trend of the cost of fossil fuels goes in the opposite direction despite their current volatility. The growth in clean energy is unstoppable, as reflected in the statistics produced in 2015 by the International Energy Agency (AIE): they accounted for almost half of all the new generation capacity installed in 2014, when they were the second largest source of electricity largest in the world, behind coal. According to the IEA, global electricity demand will have increased by 70% by 2040, its share of final energy use will increase from 18 to 24% during the same period, driven mainly by the emerging economies of India, China, Africa and Middle East. and Southeast Asia. Why do we need to use renewable energy? http://bit.ly/2Ng8DIl Since then, the shares of U.S. energy consumption from biofuels, solar, and wind energy have increased. ... Renewable energy plays an important role in reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Using renewable energy can reduce the use of fossil fuels, which are major sources of U.S. carbon dioxide emissions. What are the advantages of renewable energy? http://bit.ly/2Ng8DIl One major advantage with the use of renewable energy is that as it is renewable it is therefore sustainable and so will never run out. Renewable energy facilities generally require less maintenance than traditional generators. Their fuel being derived from natural and available resources reduces the costs of operation. Why is it better to use renewable energy? A wealth of alternative energy sources, from wind and solar energy to hydroelectricity and biomass fuel offer a way to power homes, vehicles or businesses without using fossil fuels. That means renewable energy sources can help reduce the amount of greenhouse gas emissions we put into the air. Why do we need energy? http://bit.ly/2Ng8DIl Energy fuels your body's internal functions, repairs, builds and maintains cells and body tissues, and supports the external activities that enable you to interact with the physical world. Water, your body's most important nutrient, helps facilitate the chemical reactions that produce energy from food Why solar energy is important? Solar Is Clean and Safe. Solar is a safe alternative which can replace current fossil fuels like coal and gas for generation of electricity that produce air, water, and land pollution. ... Use of solar energy will eliminate these unsafe, unclean consequences from using conventional fossil fuels. Why is energy so important? http://bit.ly/2Ng8DIl Energy, defined as the capacity for work. It is almost the cause of so many things going on around us. When we eat, our bodies stored energy through the food and this energy turn into for allowing us to do action in any business. ... Energy is very important for world also our daily life Why is it important to save energy? It's a no-brainer: When we use less energy, we save precious natural resources and cut down on pollution. ... So, energy efficiency helps us keep more resources on the earth longer. Avoiding pollution: From power plants to cars, consuming energy can produce emissions that harm our environment. http://bit.ly/2Ng8DIl Importance of Renewable Energy - https://youtu.be/gN_-4Kp55s8
Humans and Energy: Crash Course World History 207
 
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In which Stan Muller subs for John Green and teaches you about energy and humanity. Today we discuss the ideas put forth by Alfred Crosby in his book, Children of the Sun. Historically, almost all of the energy that humans use has been directly or indirectly generated by the sun, whether that be food energy from plants, wind energy, direct solar energy, or fossil fuels. Stan looks into these different sources, and talks about how humanity will continue to use energy in the future as populations grow and energy resources become more scarce. You can directly support Crash Course at https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Subscribe for as little as $0 to keep up with everything we're doing. Free is nice, but if you can afford to pay a little every month, it really helps us to continue producing this content. SUBBABLE SPONSOR MESSAGES! TO: Dana FROM: Cameron you're wonderful, I can't wait for our faces to meet :) TO: TheGeekyBlonde FROM: Arbace Thanks for your outstanding Youtube Abuse Recovery video! http://youtu.be/3Uc5eNNG60o You can get Alfred Crosby's Children of the Sun here: http://smile.amazon.com/Children-Sun-Humanitys-Unappeasable-Appetite/dp/0393931536/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1409260623&sr=8-1&keywords=crosby+children+of+the+sun
Views: 1076123 CrashCourse
Germany PROVES We Can END Fossil Fuels
 
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Germany had to pay customers to CONSUME electricity because of renewable energy, Hasan Piker gives you The Breakdown. Watch more of The Breakdown here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLTpcK80irdQgwDbfO28W25hUx6T1VYkyQ Hosted by Hasan Piker (http://www.twitter.com/hasanthehun)
Views: 149655 The Young Turks
Mapping the world's energy sources
 
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The world produces electricity from three major sources: fossil fuels, nuclear energy, and renewables. Of the three, fossil fuels is still the most dominant. So how many countries would be left in the dark if we were to ban them tomorrow? The innovators at goCompare can answer that question with their interactive map that reveals the different sources of energy that power the world. -------------------------------------------------- Follow BI Video on Twitter: http://bit.ly/1oS68Zs Follow BI on Facebook: http://bit.ly/1W9Lk0n Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/ -------------------------------------------------- Business Insider is the fastest growing business news site in the US. Our mission: to tell you all you need to know about the big world around you. The BI Video team focuses on technology, strategy and science with an emphasis on unique storytelling and data that appeals to the next generation of leaders – the digital generation.
Views: 15264 Business Insider
Fossil Fuels
 
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024 - Fossil Fuels In this video Paul Andersen explains how fossil fuels are formed when organic material is heating and squeezed in an anaerobic environment. Formation, extraction, advantages, and disadvantages are discussed for coal, petroleum and natural gas. Do you speak another language? Help me translate my videos: http://www.bozemanscience.com/translations/ Music Attribution Intro Title: I4dsong_loop_main.wav Artist: CosmicD Link to sound: http://www.freesound.org/people/CosmicD/sounds/72556/ Creative Commons Atribution License Outro Title: String Theory Artist: Herman Jolly http://sunsetvalley.bandcamp.com/track/string-theory All of the images are licensed under creative commons and public domain licensing: BLM, T. P. F. office of the. (2007). English: A natural gas drilling rig on the Pinedale Anticline, just west of Wyoming’s Wind River Range. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Rig_wind_river.jpg Bobjgalindo. (2004). English: Gas prices, may 2004, Sinclair gas station, Oregon. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:GasPriceOR.jpg Coal formation. (n.d.). Retrieved November 20, 2015, from https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/13598459184/ Company, N. I. O. (1970). Bidboland gas refinery Aghajary Iran. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Bidboland_gas_refinery.jpg Delphi234. (2014). English: Total world energy consumption by source 2013, from REN21 Renewables 2014 Global Status Report. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Total_World_Energy_Consumption_by_Source_2013.png Diatom. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://openclipart.org/detail/174569/diatom English: Anthracite coal. ([object HTMLTableCellElement]). Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Coal_anthracite.jpg John, J. S. (2013). English: Tar sandstone from the Monterey Formation of Miocene age. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Tar_Sandstone_California.jpg Knight, A. E. (2015). English: A sign for a Sinclair gas station. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sinclair_gas_station_sign.JPG Observatory, N. E. (2009). English: Athabasca Oil Sands NASA Earth Observatory image by Jesse Allen and Robert Simmon. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Athabasca_oil_sands.jpg Plazak. (2015). English: Hubbert’s upper-bound prediction for US crude oil production (1956), and actual lower-48 states production through 2014. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Hubbert_Upper-Bound_Peak_1956.png Unknown. (2004). English: Coal mine in Wyoming. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Coal_mine_Wyoming.jpg USA, G. ([object HTMLTableCellElement]). Italiano: Grafico che rappresenta il picco di Hubbert della produzione petrolifera mondiale. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Hubbert_world_2004.svg User. (2011). English: Chu Huo in Kenting, Taiwan. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Chuhuo.jpg Wikipedia, F. at E. (2007). English: A pumpjack in Texas. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Oil_well.jpg Wikipedia, S. at E. (2007). English: Castle Gate Power Plant near Helper by David Jolley 2007. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Castle_Gate_Power_Plant,_Utah_2007.jpg Wikipedia, T. original uploader was D. at E. (2004). Coal cars in Ashtabula, Ohio. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ashtabulacoalcars_e2.jpg Wikipedia, W. at E. (2007). Outcrop of Ordovician oil shale (kukersite), northern Estonia. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:OilShaleEstonia.jpg Zooplankton silhouette. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://openclipart.org/detail/170815/zooplankton-silhouette
Views: 81746 Bozeman Science
Safety Smart® Science with Bill Nye the Science Guy®: Renewable Energy -- PREVIEW
 
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Bill Nye the Science Guy® explores the science of renewable energy and demonstrates how we can use science and technology to engineer a brighter tomorrow. Using his trademark blend of hands-on demos and humor, Bill Explains Newton's First Law. Then, he's off to the Renewable Energy Lab at UL to compare renewable and non-renewable energy sources such as fossil fuels, solar, wind, and hydroelectricity. Languages: English and Spanish http://www.dep-store.com/ProductDetails.asp?ProductCode=77E42VL00 For more information, go to www.DisneyEducation.com.
Renewable Energy Slowly Reducing Fossil Fuel Use
 
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As the United Nations Climate Change Conference takes place in Copenhagen, alternative energy sources that produce little or no greenhouse gas pollution are getting a lot of attention. VOA's Greg Flakus reports.
Views: 986 VOA News
Alternative Energy vs Fossil Fuels (Alex Epstein Interview)
 
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Alex Epstein (author and energy theorist) joins Dave Rubin to discuss the climate change debate, including alternative energy, Al Gore, and oil spills. ***Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=RubinReport Direct Message - Dave Rubin on the Climate Change Debate: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z5c_XGMWfgI Watch the full interview with Alex Epstein: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yJmL9hRrpIQ For an alternate view point on the same topic, watch Dave's interview with Dr. Michael E. Mann: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2_Rtr8zET1o&index=1&list=PLEbhOtC9klbBzz3Jy2K0Y6truU0L66N21 The Rubin Report is fully fan-funded: http://www.rubinreport.com/donate SUPPORT MONTHLY (Patreon): https://www.patreon.com/rubinreport SUPPORT ONE-TIME (PayPal): http://www.rubinreport.com/donate What are your thoughts? Comment below or tweet to Dave: https://twitter.com/RubinReport Sign up for our newsletter with the best of Rubin Report each week: http://www.rubinreport.com/newsletter Find us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/rubinreport?ty=h ****** Alex Epstein Author and Energy Theorist Alex on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AlexEpstein Get the book "The Moral Case For Fossil Fuels" here: http://amzn.to/2av9UsX ****** Follow Dave on Twitter: https://twitter.com/RubinReport Follow The Rubin Report on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rubinreport Follow Dave on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/daverubin About Dave Rubin: http://daverubin.tv/ ****** Care about free speech? Tired of political correctness? Like discussions about big ideas? Watch Dave Rubin on The Rubin Report. Real conversations, unfiltered rants, and one on one interviews with some of the most interesting names in news and entertainment. Comedians, authors, and influencers join Dave each week to break down the latest in politics and current events. The Rubin Report is fully fan-funded, find us on Patreon.
Views: 47689 The Rubin Report
NON-RENEWABLE SOURCES OF ENERGY
 
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For accessing 7Activestudio videos on mobile Download SCIENCETUTS App to Access 120+ hours of Free digital content. For more information: http://www.7activestudio.com [email protected] http://www.7activemedical.com/ [email protected] http://www.sciencetuts.com/ Contact: +91- 9700061777, 040-64501777 / 65864777 7 Active Technology Solutions Pvt.Ltd. is an educational 3D digital content provider for K-12. We also customise the content as per your requirement for companies platform providers colleges etc . 7 Active driving force "The Joy of Happy Learning" -- is what makes difference from other digital content providers. We consider Student needs, Lecturer needs and College needs in designing the 3D & 2D Animated Video Lectures. We are carrying a huge 3D Digital Library ready to use. Most non-renewable energy sources are fossil fuels: coal, petroleum, and natural gas. Carbon is the main element in fossil fuels. For this reason, the time period that fossil fuels formed (about 360-300 million years ago) is called the Carboniferous Period.
Views: 2689 7activestudio
218. Alternative sources of Energy   IELTS Essay topic
 
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Fossil fuels (coal, oil, natural gas) are the main sources in many countries, but in some countries the use of alternative sources of energy (wind energy and solar energy) are encouraged. To what extent do you think it is a positive or negative development?
Views: 9488 MakkarIelts
What is energy for kids | Learn about Energy Sources | Renewable Energy |  الطاقة | エネルギー | zaffron
 
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This video represents a good explanation of What is energy for kids. You will gonna learn about Energy Sources for kids, How we use Energy ( how to save energy ) and a brief understanding about different types of Renewable Energy resources as well as the nonrenewable ones. ► What is energy ? The best definition of energy, that every children should know, is that the Scientists define energy as the ability to do work. Modern civilization is possible because people have learned how to change energy from one form to another and then use it to do work. We use energy to move cars along roads and boats through water, to cook food on stoves, to make ice in freezers, and to light our homes. Energy comes in different forms: Heat (thermal), Light (radiant), Motion (kinetic), Electrical, Chemical, Nuclear energy and Gravitational Energy. People use energy for everything from making a jump shot to sending astronauts into space. There are two types of energy: ( Stored (potential) energy + Working (kinetic) energy ). For example, the food a person eats contains chemical energy, and a person's body stores this energy until he or she uses it as kinetic energy during work or play. Energy sources can be categorized as renewable or nonrenewable When people use electricity in their homes, the electrical power was probably generated by burning coal, by a nuclear reaction, or by a hydroelectric plant on a river, to name just a few sources. Therefore, coal, nuclear, and hydro are called energy sources. When people fill up a gas tank, the source might be petroleum refined from crude oil or ethanol made by growing and processing corn. Energy sources are divided into two groups: 1- Renewable (an energy source that can be easily replenished) 2- Nonrenewable (an energy source that cannot be easily replenished). ► Renewable energy and nonrenewable energy for kids : Renewable and nonrenewable energy sources can be used as primary energy sources to produce useful energy such as heat or used to produce secondary energy sources such as electricity. When people use electricity in their homes, the electrical power was probably generated from burning coal or natural gas, a nuclear reaction, or a hydroelectric plant on a river, to name a few possible energy sources. The gasoline people use to fuel their cars is made from crude oil (nonrenewable energy) and may contain a bio-fuel (renewable energy) like ethanol, which is made from processed corn. ► Moreover, you will gonna learn What is renewable energy for kids ? There are five main renewable energy sources: 1- Solar energy from the sun 2- Geothermal energy from heat inside the earth 3- Wind energy 4- Biomass from plants 5- Hydro power from flowing water ► What is Nonrenewable energy ? Most of the energy consumed in the United States is from nonrenewable energy sources: ( Petroleum products - Hydrocarbon gas liquids - Natural gas - Coal - Nuclear energy ). Crude oil, natural gas, and coal are called fossil fuels because they were formed over millions of years by the action of heat from the earth's core and pressure from rock and soil on the remains (or fossils) of dead plants and creatures like microscopic diatoms. Most of the petroleum products consumed in the United States are made from crude oil, but petroleum liquids can also be made from natural gas and coal. Nuclear energy is produced from uranium, a nonrenewable energy source whose atoms are split (through a process called nuclear fission) to create heat and, eventually, electricity. By watching this video, you will gonna learn how to conserve energy resources ( energy saving ) by understanding how energy conservation mechanism work as well as much knowledge about alternative energy resources. Enjoy watching and have a great time learning about energy sources for children.
Views: 49371 Zaffron
Will Fossil Fuels Run Out? | Earth Lab
 
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Greg Foot looks into the dirty world of fossil fuels. Will we run out of fossil fuels and what cost will we likely pay for their use? Footnotes 1 - http://www.fe.doe.gov/education/energylessons/coal/gen_howformed.html and https://www.theguardian.com/science/2009/feb/07/first-dinosaurs-late-triassic 2 - http://www.fe.doe.gov/education/energylessons/coal/gen_howformed.html 3- https://www.theguardian.com/environment/keep-it-in-the-ground-blog/2015/mar/25/what-numbers-tell-about-how-much-fossil-fuel-reserves-cant-burn 4- https://www.bp.com/content/dam/bp/pdf/energy-economics/statistical-review-2015/bp-statistical-review-of-world-energy-2015-full-report.pdf 5- http://fortune.com/2016/07/05/oil-reserves-us/ 6- https://www.theguardian.com/environment/keep-it-in-the-ground-blog/2015/mar/25/what-numbers-tell-about-how-much-fossil-fuel-reserves-cant-burn 7- http://www.forbes.com/sites/davidblackmon/2013/07/16/as-fracking-rises-peak-oil-theory-slowly-dies/#7bc2bf0c589b 8- https://www.eia.gov/energy_in_brief/article/shale_in_the_united_states.cfm 9- https://www.theguardian.com/environment/earth-insight/2013/jul/23/peak-oil-bbc-shale-fracking-economy-recession 10- http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2013EO280001/abstract 11- http://www.npr.org/sections/money/2016/08/17/490375230/oil-3-how-fracking-changed-the-world 12- https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-09-13/saudi-arabia-overtakes-u-s-as-largest-oil-producer-iea-says 13 - http://climate.nasa.gov/ and http://www.slate.com/blogs/bad_astronomy/2015/05/26/climate_change_denying_reality_is_a_threat_to_our_nation.html 14 https://www.epa.gov/ghgemissions/overview-greenhouse-gases 15 http://www.carbontracker.org/resources/ and https://www.theguardian.com/environment/keep-it-in-the-ground-blog/2015/mar/25/what-numbers-tell-about-how-much-fossil-fuel-reserves-cant-burn 16 - https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/the-age-of-wind-and-solar-is-closer-than-you-think/ Subscribe for more awesome science - http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=HeadsqueezeTV http://www.youtube.com/user/HeadsqueezeTV
Views: 371296 BBC Earth Lab
Renewed Energy Song
 
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Here is a song I created to help my 6th grade students study. I hope you enjoy. So what we use fuels It's what people need We're just having fun We don't care who sees But these fuels will go out Supplies are limited Need to use renewed energy Uh, uh, uh Oil, gas, and coal are used up Forming from plants remains of animals Built up in rock in layers Keep it trapped below We dig down for it Chemical energy released you burn on it People use fuels for cooking, electricity, lighting, cars, and heating And use them up but they're limited Supplies down demand so great we all need to find a better way Yeah, uh you know what? Need fuels to use again Sun is on my face Solar panels in place Catching solar rays Biogas from rotting waste Geothermal heat energy, volcanic areas blowing all day Wind turbines turning away Water is safe flowing away Hydroelectric power station Renewable sources only used about 5% So what we use fuels It's what people need We're just having fun We don't care who sees But these fuels will go out Supplies are limited Need to use renewed energy Reservoir's flowin' there Hydroelectric power plant Spinning turbine activates generators A large dam Ocean's everywhere we going thermal energy Mechanical is up when tides and waves come And then there's hydrogen One proton one electron Simple but no gas around Always combination From the ground up organic hydrocarbons Separated reforming no pollution Fuel cells combining the two gasses really Hydrogen and oxygen producing electricity Convert the energy not losing charge As long as the fuel continues to be supplied F-U-E-L, C-E-L-L, G-A-S, 4 C-A-R'S, clean fuel see Natural gas methanol Can fuel cells fueled directly No reformer So what we use fuels It's what people need We're just having fun We don't care who sees But these fuels will go out Supplies are limited Need to use renewed energy Yea, nuclear energy Produced when atoms are broken apart Maybe best one but makes radioactive waste So, nuclear energy Produced when atoms are broken apart Maybe best one but makes radioactive waste So what we use fuels It's what people need We're just having fun We don't care who sees But these fuels will go out Supplies are limited Need to use renewed energy
Views: 164929 ParrMr
Can We Rely on Wind and Solar Energy?
 
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Is green energy, particularly wind and solar energy, the solution to our climate and energy problems? Or should we be relying on things like natural gas, nuclear energy, and even coal for our energy needs and environmental obligations? Alex Epstein of the Center for Industrial Progress explains. Donate today to PragerU! http://l.prageru.com/2ylo1Yt Joining PragerU is free! Sign up now to get all our videos as soon as they're released. http://prageru.com/signup Download Pragerpedia on your iPhone or Android! Thousands of sources and facts at your fingertips. iPhone: http://l.prageru.com/2dlsnbG Android: http://l.prageru.com/2dlsS5e Join Prager United to get new swag every quarter, exclusive early access to our videos, and an annual TownHall phone call with Dennis Prager! http://l.prageru.com/2c9n6ys Join PragerU's text list to have these videos, free merchandise giveaways and breaking announcements sent directly to your phone! https://optin.mobiniti.com/prageru Do you shop on Amazon? Click https://smile.amazon.com and a percentage of every Amazon purchase will be donated to PragerU. Same great products. Same low price. Shopping made meaningful. VISIT PragerU! https://www.prageru.com FOLLOW us! Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/prageru Twitter: https://twitter.com/prageru Instagram: https://instagram.com/prageru/ PragerU is on Snapchat! JOIN PragerFORCE! For Students: http://l.prageru.com/29SgPaX JOIN our Educators Network! http://l.prageru.com/2c8vsff Script: Are wind and solar power the answer to our energy needs? There’s a lot of sun and a lot of wind. They’re free. They’re clean. No CO2 emissions. So, what’s the problem? Why do solar and wind combined provide less than 2% of the world’s energy? To answer these questions, we need to understand what makes energy, or anything else for that matter, cheap and plentiful. For something to be cheap and plentiful, every part of the process to produce it, including every input that goes into it, must be cheap and plentiful. Yes, the sun is free. Yes, wind is free. But the process of turning sunlight and wind into useable energy on a mass scale is far from free. In fact, compared to the other sources of energy -- fossil fuels, nuclear power, and hydroelectric power, solar and wind power are very expensive. The basic problem is that sunlight and wind as energy sources are both weak (the more technical term is dilute) and unreliable (the more technical term is intermittent). It takes a lot of resources to collect and concentrate them, and even more resources to make them available on-demand. These are called the diluteness problem and the intermittency problem. The diluteness problem is that, unlike coal or oil, the sun and the wind don’t deliver concentrated energy -- which means you need a lot of additional materials to produce a unit of energy. For solar power, such materials can include highly purified silicon, phosphorus, boron, and a dozen other complex compounds like titanium dioxide. All these materials have to be mined, refined and/or manufactured in order to make solar panels. Those industrial processes take a lot of energy. For wind, needed materials include high-performance compounds for turbine blades and the rare-earth metal neodymium for lightweight, specialty magnets, as well as the steel and concrete necessary to build structures -- thousands of them -- as tall as skyscrapers. And as big a problem as diluteness is, it’s nothing compared to the intermittency problem. This isn’t exactly a news flash, but the sun doesn’t shine all the time. And the wind doesn’t blow all the time. The only way for solar and wind to be truly useful would be if we could store them so that they would be available when we needed them. You can store oil in a tank. Where do you store solar or wind energy? No such mass-storage system exists. Which is why, in the entire world, there is not one real or proposed independent, freestanding solar or wind power plant. All of them require backup. And guess what the go-to back-up is: fossil fuel. Here’s what solar and wind electricity look like in Germany, which is the world’s leader in “renewables”. The word erratic leaps to mind. Wind is constantly varying, sometimes disappearing completely. And solar produces little in the winter months when Germany most needs energy. For the complete script, visit https://www.prageru.com/videos/can-we-rely-wind-and-solar-energy
Views: 1311987 PragerU
Renewable Energy and the Energy Transition
 
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The world is driven by fossil fuels like oil and gas. This has some negative repercussions: Rising energy prices due to decreasing deposits, dependence on unstable oil and gas producing regimes and global warming. It becomes clear, that a revolution in the way how we produce and use energy is necessary. Central to this energy transition are new technologies, which produce energy from renewable sources such as wind or sun. With Germany as an example, this documentary video shows what renewable energies are and how they work as well as what the concept of energy transition means. The clip is part of the WissensWerte Project of the german non-profit organization /e-politik.de/ e.V. Realization: edeos- digital education http://www.edeos.org/en By Jörn Barkemeyer and Jan Künzl Editorial Laura Hörath #Renewable #Energy #Transition #Explainer #Germany #Power
David Suzuki wants Canada to embrace renewable energy before it's too late | Canada is ...
 
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Renowned environmentalist David Suzuki discusses how the average Canadian has grown increasingly disconnected from nature, and the steps Canada must take to get off fossil fuels and embrace renewable energy. Subscribe: http://bit.ly/CBC-Subscribe Watch More Shows: http://bit.ly/CBC-MoreShows “Canada is…” is a series produced in collaboration with Thought Café showcasing the many facets of Canadian identity. Leading figures in each field explore how their area relates to Canadian culture and capture a part of what it means to be Canadian. Subscribe to Thought Café: http://bit.ly/1OhMPQC Subscribe to CBC: http://bit.ly/CBC-Subscribe Watch More: http://bit.ly/CBC-MoreShows About CBC: Welcome to the official YouTube channel for CBC, Canada’s public broadcaster. CBC is dedicated to creating content with original voices that inspire and entertain. Watch sneak peeks and trailers, behind the scenes footage, original web series, digital-exclusives and more. Connect with CBC Online: Twitter: http://bit.ly/CBC-Twitter Facebook: http://bit.ly/CBC-Facebook Instagram: http://bit.ly/CBC-Instagram David Suzuki wants Canada to embrace renewable energy before it's too late | Canada is ... http://youtube.com/user/cbctv
Views: 4175 CBC
From Fossil Fuels to Renewable Energy
 
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Atmospheric carbon dioxide levels have hit an all time high as energy producers use fossils fuels to generate power for an ever growing population. As a result from excessive atmospheric carbon dioxide, we are beginning to experience climate change, human, and wildlife health related issues. In order to push forward to create a healthier planet, we need to push forward with the use of renewable energy resources.
Views: 187 Adam Buchli
Freedom from fossil fuels is closer than you think  | Dhruvik Parikh | TEDxSnoIsleLibraries
 
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You might be wondering what a high school student can do to help address climate change. In his fascinating talk on his experimental research into energy independence, Dhruvik Parikh offers unique theories in the form of agricultural waste and “close-looped” systems where the waste of production can be used to fuel the next round of production creating local systems that are self-sustaining. Dhruvik also addresses concepts for community access to clean water and energy storage where whole communities work to develop their own collective renewable energy system. By examining the environmental and economic considerations of harnessing energies already available, Dhruhvik sees a future where cities can be self-sustaining and communities can thrive. Student at Henry M. Jackson High School, Mill Creek, Washington. Participant in a variety of clubs including the Technology Student Association and MIT Launch Club. Co-founded startup, Travalot, at the prestigious MIT Launch startup incubator. Managed strategy and operations for the company. Interested in finding solutions to the energy storage conundrum. Developed a novel method of biodiesel production using winery waste and engineered a membrane for redox flow batteries for superior conductivity. Is passionate about "distributed energy" and the equitable rollout of new technologies in developing countries. Well versed in Java and Python. Currently working on a deep learning approach to identify promising materials as components of redox flow batteries. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx
Views: 5300 TEDx Talks
Renewable energies: the return of biomass
 
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Activate the subtitles in the player window, interviews are in French! For thousands of years biomass (organic matter) was the primary source of energy. Since the industrial revolution, the combustion of fossil fuels, accounting for 87% of today’s global energy package, has replaced biomass as the primary source. Yet issues surrounding energy and food production and sustainable development engender new perspectives on the production of bio-fuels, especially from by-products of agro-industry and forestry. Biomass, now supporting 10% of world energy consumption, could increase to provide 25% of global energy needs. This film combines figures, schematics, and interviews with professionals in the field (e.g. economist, farmer, mechanic, researcher, aircraft manufacturer...). The potential for biomass is evident, but its usage must be rational, optimized and adapted to local environments. A film by Gérard Goma (scientific advisor) and Mathias Fyferling
Views: 94466 Mathias Fyferling
What Are The Alternative Sources Of Energy?
 
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They are widely available and environment energy that is not popularly used usually environmentally sound, such as solar or wind (as opposed to fossil fuels). What is alternative energy? Universe today. Php url? Q webcache. Alternative sources of energy are clean and green but the catch is they generate less renewable sustainable obtained from inexhaustible resources. Examples include wind, solar, biomass, wave and tidal energy commonly known alternative sourceswind energytidal power you have probably also heard of renewable sources, which can often be the same as sources. As already 29 may 2012 alternative sources of energy6hyq 9357 ufy9 9ufc erldcontents definition energy why use fossil fuel examples resources has a wide arrange application in our daily lives, that's oil products are extremely demanded refers to that have no undesired consequences such for example fuels or nuclear. Alternative energy wikipedia alternative sources solar, wind, geothermal, biomass conserve future alternativeenergysources. Alternative sources of energy slideshare. Alternative energy wind, solar, hydro and other alt sources why is important to find alternative sources? Top 7 energies listed natural gas, hydrogen, wind 5 that are cheaper than solar aol. Alternative energy sources solar, wind, geothermal, biomass alternative wikipediawhat is energy? Definition & video lesson and of. Fuel sources that are other than those derived from fossil fuels. Renewable energy sources include wind, solar, biomass, geothermal and hydro the sun is probably most important source of renewable available today alternative definition, energy, as or nuclear that can replace supplement traditional fossil fuel sources, coal, oil, natural gas Alternative geothermal, biomass wikipediawhat energy? Definition & video lesson. Alternative energy wikipedia. Define alternative energy at dictionary. Pros and cons of 4 common alternative energy sources. Typically used interchangeably for renewable energy. Googleusercontent search. Top 5 examples of alternative energy resources green uptown. Alternative energy sources 22 jan 2010 in addition to the above answers, which are all valid and important points, we can also look at this from a national security independence 14 2009 that jacobson found most promising were, alternatives good not ones people have alternative is use of non conventional generate electrical power fuel vehicles for today's residential, commercial, institutional 19 jul 2013 when it comes 'alternative' ways electricity, solar just about expensive form you buy new wave technologies on verge producing that's clean, renewable, importantly, affordable news information free future. Alternative energy national geographic videorenewable target (ret) & alternate sources solar renewable and alternative penn state. While alternative energy is pretty much learn more about sources in the previous tutorial be saw that fossil fuels are remains of dead plants and animals which have been buried r
Views: 45 Uco Uco
Is Solar Energy Really Better Than Nuclear Energy?
 
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Nuclear energy is a cheap and relatively clean source of energy for the planet, but lately it has been mired in controversy. Solar energy is often brought up as alternative resource, but is it really better than nuclear energy? Which is better for the planet? Let’s find out in this battle of Nuclear Energy vs Solar Energy! SUBSCRIBE TO OUR CHANNEL —► http://bit.ly/2glTFyc Patreon..........► https://www.patreon.com/user?u=861446 Facebook.......► https://facebook.com/TheInfographicsShow Twitter............► https://twitter.com/TheInfoShow Subreddit.......► http://reddit.com/r/TheInfographicsShow -------------------------------------------------------------------------- Sources for this video: http://pastebin.com/kXq4vFMB Our channel —► http://www.youtube.com/user/TheInfographicsShow/ Videos made by us and others —► https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=LLfdNM3NAhaBOXCafH7krzrA Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/2lfi/
Views: 520658 The Infographics Show
A small country with big ideas to get rid of fossil fuels | Monica Araya
 
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How do we build a society without fossil fuels? Using her native Costa Rica as an example of positive action on environmental protection and renewables, climate advocate Monica Araya outlines a bold vision for a world committed to clean energy in all sectors. TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more. Find closed captions and translated subtitles in many languages at http://www.ted.com/translate Follow TED news on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/tednews Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED Subscribe to our channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/TEDtalksDirector
Views: 124453 TED
How are fossil fuels formed?
 
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CBSE class 10 Science - Sources of energy - Petroleum, Coal, Natural Gas are all known as the fossil fuels. Formation of fossil fuels happened millions of years ago. The dead plants and animals got buried into the oceans and rivers, and with the effect of Pressure and Temperature broke down into simpler products and the final product was the fossil fuels. Coal was formed by the remains of the plants whereas the Petroleum was formed by aquatic marine life. Since it takes millions of years in the formation of the fossil fuels hence these are non-renewable sources of energy. Petroleum products are generally used for running the vehicles and the coal is majorly used in the thermal plants to generate electricity. About PrepOngo: Best Online Learning App which provides CBSE class 10 interactive video lectures, NCERT solutions, written study material, solved examples, in chapter quizzes and practice problems for Science (Physics, Chemistry, Biology) and Mathematics. We try to help the students understand lessons by visualising the concepts through illustrative and interactive videos, practice from large question banks and evaluate and improve yourself continuously. Online Live courses are also offered for CBSE boards, JEE Mains, JEE-Advanced, NEET and Board preparation for class 10, 11 and 12 For all CBSE class 10 Science and Maths video lectures download the Android App: https://goo.gl/HJwkhw Subscribe to our YouTube Channel: https://goo.gl/KSsWP2
Views: 20389 PrepOnGo
Is there an alternative to fossil fuels?
 
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Green Biologics are a renewable chemicals company who are not only changing the face of renewable chemicals, but are changing the world while they are at it. Dr Liz Jenkinson is one of the lead researchers at the company, and it is her work that is providing the answer to the question: is there an alternative to fossil fuels? Her work proves that the answer is yes, and that it only relies on three key components – bacteria, genetic engineering and sugar.
Views: 11875 Science Animated
Why Alternative Energy Doesn't Offset Fossil Fuel Use
 
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We generally assume that alternative energy production offsets fossil fuel use. But does it? http://GreenIllusions.org Subsidizing energy production expands energy supplies. We like that because it leads to lower energy costs. But, demand for energy subsequently increases. So we come right back to where we started with high demand and so-called insufficient supply. Well then we need more energy subsidies... And the cycle continues. About the book Green Illusions: We don't have an energy crisis. We have a consumption crisis. And this book, which takes aim at cherished assumptions regarding energy, offers refreshingly straight talk about what's wrong with the way we think and talk about the problem. Though we generally believe we can solve environmental problems with more energy—more solar cells, wind turbines, and biofuels—alternative technologies come with their own side effects and limitations. How, for instance, do solar cells cause harm? Why can't engineers solve wind power's biggest obstacle? Why won't contraception solve the problem of overpopulation lying at the heart of our concerns about energy, and what will? This practical, environmentally informed, and lucid book persuasively argues for a change of perspective. If consumption is the problem, as Ozzie Zehner suggests, then we need to shift our focus from suspect alternative energies to improving social and political fundamentals: walkable communities, improved consumption, enlightened governance, and, most notably, women's rights. The dozens of first steps he offers are surprisingly straightforward. For instance, he introduces a simple sticker that promises a greater impact than all of the nation's solar cells. He uncovers why carbon taxes won't solve our energy challenges (and presents two taxes that could). Finally, he explores how future environmentalists will focus on similarly fresh alternatives that are affordable, clean, and can actually improve our well-being.
Views: 17977 Ozzie Zehner
Renewable Energy Sources, Working of A solar cell, and Biomass fuels
 
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The World currently relies heavily on coal, oil, and natural gas for its energy. Fossil fuels are non-renewable, that is, they draw on finite resources that will eventually dwindle, becoming too expensive or too environmentally damaging to retrieve. In contrast, the many types of renewable energy resources-such as wind and solar energy-are constantly replenished and will never run out. After 40 years, the fossil fuels will get exhausted and we will have to use these methods to generate power.
Views: 69 Harsh Patil
RENEWABLE ENERGIES ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS
 
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Hazards of Renewable Energy The facts are in and yes Renewable Energy and technologies are lowering the carbon footprint slowly over time. But let’s make it clear that All energy sources have some impact on our environment. Fossil fuels—coal, oil, and natural gas—do substantially more harm than renewable energy sources by most measures, including air and water pollution, damage to public health, wildlife and habitat loss, water use, land use, and global warming emissions. However, renewable sources such as wind, solar, geothermal, biomass, and hydropower also have environmental impacts, some of which are significant. For instance, the amount of land they take up, the sounds and vibrations are big complaint by nearby homeowners. There are also greenhouse gases caused by the manufacturing of these renewable manufactures of solar and wind farms. Not to mention the human dangers associated with going 100% renwable energy. Wind Turbines have the highest accident rate in the work place. The transportation of the giant Blades for these Wind Mills are challenging to transport. The manufacturing isn’t that safe either, and they seem to attract lightening which casuse severe damage to the turbine engines.
Views: 179 Energy News Now
Fossil Fuels and Renewable Energy
 
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We are a group of students who go to Jackson High School, and we have made a project that explains the problems of fossil fuels and that we need to change to a cleaner energy. Please tell us what you thought was interesting or something you didn't know before. Please like the video and give us your feedback. Song: Petals - Miro Music provided by Ninety9Lives Video: https://youtu.be/D4jt6otR8Xc Download: http://99l.tv/PetalsYU Song: Free - Ahxello Music provided by Ninety9Lives Video: https://youtu.be/v3GGYd3fJbg Download: http://99l.tv/Free1YU Song: Drift - 100 Day Delay & Goodbye Gravity Music provided by Ninety9Lives Video: https://youtu.be/Pd9gtBUvBLs Download: http://99l.tv/DriftYU "Cold by Jorge Mendez" Music Used: (Nicolai Heidlas - Colorful Spots) Colorful Spots SUPER EXTENDED - Nicolai Heidlas - Happy Ukulele Backing Track Direct Link: https://soundcloud.com/nicolai-heidla... License: CC 3.0 Link to License: On Artists' home page -https://soundcloud.com/nicolai-heidlas The End Of The Oil Age, How Much Is Left And What Will Happen When We Run Out https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yGsPc3fptoY
Views: 396 Eric Magee