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Bacterial Reproduction & Exchanges of Genetic Material
 
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Details of Binary Fission, Bacterial Conjugation, Transformation, and Transduction
Views: 173740 Craig Savage
Horizontal gene transfer | Transformation, Transduction and Conjugation
 
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Transformation, Transduction and Conjugation - This lecture explains about the difference between conjugation, transformation and transduction. It explains the process of gene exchange between bacteria via horizontal gene transfer also known as lateral gene transfer. Conjugation - gene exchange between bacteria by physical contact through the formation of conjugation tube. Transformation - the transfer of DNA fragments through bacterial uptake Transduction - the transfer of genes through the bacteriophage particles. Transformation involves uptake of short fragments of naked DNA by naturally transformable bacteria. Transduction involves transfer of DNA from one bacterium into another via bacteriophages. Conjugation involves transfer of DNA via sexual pilus and requires cell –to-cell contact. DNA fragments that contain resistance genes from resistant donors can then make previously susceptible bacteria express resistance as coded by these newly acquired resistance genes. For more information, log on to- http://www.shomusbiology.com/ Get Shomu's Biology DVD set here- http://www.shomusbiology.com/dvd-store/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.com/bio-materials.html Remember Shomu’s Biology is created to spread the knowledge of life science and biology by sharing all this free biology lectures video and animation presented by Suman Bhattacharjee in YouTube. All these tutorials are brought to you for free. Please subscribe to our channel so that we can grow together. You can check for any of the following services from Shomu’s Biology- Buy Shomu’s Biology lecture DVD set- www.shomusbiology.com/dvd-store Shomu’s Biology assignment services – www.shomusbiology.com/assignment -help Join Online coaching for CSIR NET exam – www.shomusbiology.com/net-coaching We are social. Find us on different sites here- Our Website – www.shomusbiology.com Facebook page- https://www.facebook.com/ShomusBiology/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/shomusbiology SlideShare- www.slideshare.net/shomusbiology Google plus- https://plus.google.com/113648584982732129198 LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/suman-bhattacharjee-2a051661 Youtube- https://www.youtube.com/user/TheFunsuman Thank you for watching
Views: 81918 Shomu's Biology
Conjugation, Transformation and Transduction
 
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Views: 75187 AK LECTURES
Genetic Transfer
 
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NOT MY VIDEO. GOT IT FROM: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AYvX8tnCM9s&feature=related
Views: 37275 Andrew Boyd
Bacterial Conjugation
 
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For more questions and answers, visit: https://biology-forums.com
Views: 100314 Study Force
Bacterial genetic recombination | Cells | MCAT | Khan Academy
 
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Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/mcat/cells/viruses/v/virus-structure-and-classification?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=mcat Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/mcat/cells/prokaryotes-bacteria/v/bacterial-characteristics-gram-staining?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=mcat MCAT on Khan Academy: Go ahead and practice some passage-based questions! About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s MCAT channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDkK5wqSuwDlJ3_nl3rgdiQ?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 87394 khanacademymedicine
Bacterial Transformation
 
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In this video, Biology Professor (Twitter: @DrWhitneyHolden) discusses the process of transformation in bacteria, a cool way that bacteria can obtain foreign DNA for their own use. For information on other mechanisms that bacteria use to take up foreign DNA, see Biology Professor's videos on conjugation (http://youtu.be/YycVGqBs1p0) and transduction (http://youtu.be/uJH1G7MDC5E). Great for MCAT Biology Review! For more information on the experiments that led Frederick Griffith to discover transformation: visit this Wikipedia article: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Griffith%27s_experiment
Views: 93074 Biology Professor
What is conjugation (genetic transfer) in bacteria? Why is it important?
 
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What is conjugation (genetic transfer) in bacteria? Why is it important? http://www.screenr.com/hec8
Views: 11437 rvssciencevideos2012
Bacterial Conjugation - Hfr, f prime and f plasmid
 
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Bacterial conjunction lecture - This lecture explains about the different types of Bacterial conjunction mechanism including the following plasmid. It explains about five plasmid conjunction, for prime plasmid formation and it also explains the hfr conjunction in bacteria. Hfr strains are known as the high frequency strain. For more information, log on to- http://www.shomusbiology.com/ Get Shomu's Biology DVD set here- http://www.shomusbiology.com/dvd-store/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.com/bio-materials.html Remember Shomu’s Biology is created to spread the knowledge of life science and biology by sharing all this free biology lectures video and animation presented by Suman Bhattacharjee in YouTube. All these tutorials are brought to you for free. Please subscribe to our channel so that we can grow together. You can check for any of the following services from Shomu’s Biology- Buy Shomu’s Biology lecture DVD set- www.shomusbiology.com/dvd-store Shomu’s Biology assignment services – www.shomusbiology.com/assignment -help Join Online coaching for CSIR NET exam – www.shomusbiology.com/net-coaching We are social. Find us on different sites here- Our Website – www.shomusbiology.com Facebook page- https://www.facebook.com/ShomusBiology/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/shomusbiology SlideShare- www.slideshare.net/shomusbiology Google plus- https://plus.google.com/113648584982732129198 LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/suman-bhattacharjee-2a051661 Youtube- https://www.youtube.com/user/TheFunsuman Thank you for watching the Bacterial conjugation lecture
Views: 123498 Shomu's Biology
18 Genetically Modified Organisms You Don't Know About
 
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From Glow in the Dark Rabbit to Anti-Cancer Purple Tomatoes here are 18 Genetically Modified Organisms You Don't Know About Subscribe to Talltanic http://goo.gl/wgfvrr # 9 Fish Strawberries The ripest and juiciest strawberries you got from the supermarket might contain the genetic traces of a fish. Scientists have been experimenting with combining strawberries with the “anti-freeze genes” that are found in cold water fish like Arctic Char and Sea flounders which help the strawberries resist freezing and dying in bad weather. Luckily, it doesn’t create a weird fishy-tasting strawberry. # 8 Glow in the Dark Rabbit Most genetically modified organisms have a scientific purpose in mind or a greater goal that usually justifies messing with something’s DNA spread. However, Eduard Kac used genetic engineering for creating works of art rather than for scientific research. His most notorious work was the Glow in the Dark rabbit named Alba. It sparked a debate about animal rights, but Alba died before anything was resolved. # 7 Goats Spliced with Spiders When you think of genetically splicing something with a spider, you usually think of superheroes with spider themed super powers. However, in real life, you can find animals that have been genetically combined with spiders - goats. Spider silk is flexible and strong, and some even want to try and produce it on a larger scale so we can use it to make things like parachute cords. One lab has spliced spider’s genes with a goat so that these flexible and strong spider silk genes would be replicated in their milk. This silk milk is also able to create Biosteel, a strong web-like material. # 6 Golden Rice Rice is a major staple food in many parts of the world partly because it's cheap and partly because it helps you feel full even when you don’t have much to eat. However, the normal white rice isn’t very healthy for you. That is why scientists are working on Golden Rice, rice that was spliced with vegetables like squash and carrots that not only create the golden color but include beta-carotene which is more nutrient dense and could help prevent blindness in children who eat it. # 5 Ear Mouse The most notorious genetically modified animal might be the ear mouse or the “Vacanti Mouse” which was created in 1995 by scientists in Massachusetts. The scientists wanted to prove that cartilage structures could be grown on other living creatures before being removed and transplanted into humans who need it. However, this mouse would quickly become famous or infamous as it went onto the Jay Leno show and then used as a mascot by animal-rights groups who were opposed to genetic modifications. # 4 Scorpion Cabbage The Androctonus australis is one of the most dangerous scorpions in the world with a venom that can cause tissue damage and death. So of course, we combined the genes from this scorpion with cabbage intended for human consumption. The gene of the scorpion’s venom changed when it was spliced with the cabbage. The venom is now only poison to insects, which spasm and die when they try to eat the crop. That same poison is supposedly completely harmless to humans, making it the perfect crop. # 3 Anti-Cancer Purple Tomatoes Researchers have created a tomato that is not only more flavorful but would also help prevent cancer. The researchers spliced tomatoes with the snapdragon flower to create a deep, purple tomato that almost looks like a blackberry. These super tomatoes contain potent antioxidants and inhibit the growth of cancer cells, ease the symptoms of diabetes, and even relieve the pains of growing old. You might just see purple tomatoes on your pizza someday soon. # 2 Chinese Dog-Pig This image went around the internet with a bunch of people thinking it was some sort of failed chimera of a pig and a dog because of its pink skin and strange tufts of hair. While it was not an animal that was genetically engineered in a lab, it is an animal that has been genetically engineered over generations and generations, like most dogs are. This dog, in particular, is the Hairless Chinese Crested Dog - an expensive and rare breed of dog that is highly sought after by some people. Even though the winner of the annual world’s ugliest dog contest is usually a Chinese Crested. # 1 Less-Flatulent Cows You might have heard that cows produce an excess of methane, which contributes to the dangerous greenhouse effect. It’s hard to make cows stop producing methane since they’re some of the most populous domestic livestock in the world and that is a natural part of their digestive progress. Until we genetically modified cattle to produce 25 less percent of the bacterium in their digestive tract that creates methane gas. Basically, we made cows that fart less.
Views: 1478164 Talltanic
Cassette Mutagenesis and Gene Deletions
 
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Donate here: http://www.aklectures.com/donate.php Website video link: http://www.aklectures.com/lecture/cassette-mutagenesis-and-gene-deletions Facebook link: https://www.facebook.com/aklectures Website link: http://www.aklectures.com
Views: 21928 AK LECTURES
Bacteria - Conjugation, Transformation, Transduction. NBDE/USMLE
 
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WEBSITE: https://www.passthedentalboards.com FREE occlusion document for NBDE: https://wp.me/P76wDv-7t FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/PassTheDentalBoards SUBSCRIBE:https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCbFkz1rgQUG7radni0iXCbQ?sub_confirmation=1 WEBSITE: www.passthedentalboards.com Thanks for stopping by, make sure to check out the rest of my videos. Its all about passing the boards!! I am trying to make that as easy as possible by making these videos, Don't forget to comment, like, and subscribe for more info!
Views: 30605 Pass The Dental Boards
Mixing Human DNA Animal DNA Genetic engineering Last days news
 
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Mixing Human DNA Animal DNA Genetic engineering Last days news https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Co7IKfOROE Mixing Human DNA Animal DNA Genetic engineering Last days news https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dBDG3-bXcxQ Trans Humanism http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Csxy2CAg_jE Human DNA mixed Animal DNA Last days final hour http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=amAXfL8LTUs National Geographic article to describe an experiment in 2003, during which Chinese scientists at the Shanghai Second Medical University successfully fused human cells with rabbit eggs http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human-animal_hybrid animal-human mixtures schb.org.uk 2015 BREAKING NEWS WARNING TO HUMAN RACE human-animal genetic hybrid or chimera Human dog thousands of labs worldwide with animal human experiments this is sick and funded by the world Governments. The UN is now and in preparation through 2025 worldwide. Gods Judgement will happen World war 3. We are in the end times last days the medical field is playing god DANGEREOUS times we are living. Part Human part animal genetic hybrids A parahuman is a human-animal Genetic engineering hybrid or chimera hybrid. For Years Scientists have done extensive research into the mixing of genes or cells from different species, e.g. adding human (and other animal) genes to bacteria and farm animals to mass-produce insulin and spider silk proteins, and introducing human cells into mouse embryos. Para humans have been referred to as "human-animal hybrids" in a vernacular sense that also encompasses human-animal chimeras. The term parahuman is not used in scientific publications. The term is sometimes used to sensationalize research that involves mixing biological materials from humans and other species. According to Daily Mail, as of 2011, more than 150 human-animal hybrid embryos were created in British laboratories since the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 2008. DEVELOPMENTS IN THE CREATION OF ANIMAL-HUMAN MIXTURES: 5. Animal-Human Transgenesis 6. Animal-Human Gestation 6.1. Placing a human embryo into an animal 6.2. Placing human sperm into an animal 6.3. Placing an animal embryo into a human 6.4. Placing animal sperm into a woman 7. Animal-Human Hybrid Embryos 7.1. Embryo containing cells made up of both human and animal chromosomes 7.1.1. Non-human eggs into which human nuclei are inserted Frog-Human Hybrid Entities 7.1.2. Animal-Human chromosome transplant Mouse-Human Hybrids 7.2. Non-human eggs stripped of their chromosomes into which human nuclei are inserted Gametal Cow-Human Hybrid Embryos Gametal Rabbit-Human Hybrid Embryos 7.3. Mixing of Animal and Human Gametes Genetic Human-Hamster Hybrid Embryos 18/10/2010 Ethics of animal-human mixtures schb.org.uk/.../report - animal-human ... 2/22 8. Animal-Human Chimeras 8.1. Animal-Human Chimeras Created Through Xenotransplantation 8.2. Animal-Human Embryonic and Fetal Chimeras 8.2.1. Incorporation of Human Stem Cells into Post-natal Animals 8.2.2. Incorporation of (1) Human Stem Cells into Post-blastocyst Stages of Non-human Embryos or (2) Non-human Stem Cells into Post-blatocyst stages of Human Embryos Genetic Human-Mouse Chimeric Fetuses Genetic Sheep-Human Chimeric Fetuses Genetic Monkey-Human Chimeric Fetuses Genetic Pig-Human Chimeric Fetuses 8.2.3. Incorporation of (1) Human Pluripotent Stem Cells into a Non-Human Blastocyst or its Preliminary Embryonic Stages or (2) Non-human Pluripotent Stem Cells into a Human Blastocyst or its Preliminary Embryonic Stages Genetic Human-Mouse Chimeric Embryos Glossary References Nevertheless, mixtures between biological species are relatively rare in nature, and most such entities would be less 'fit' than their progenitors. With respect to animal-human mixing new developments in crossing the species barrier may no longer limit animal-human mixtures to the domain of mythology. Indeed, procedures have recently been developed by scientists which mix human and animal biological elements to such an extent that it questions the very concept of being entirely human. Concern for animal-human mixtures was raised in 2001 by the UK Animal Procedures Committee Report on Biotechnology that though questions may exist as to the likely fate of such animal-human mixtures, there may be a deeper repugnance at the thought of their very existence. Indeed, The Regulation of New Bio technologies published in 2004 the crossing of the animal-human boundary was, in some respects, quite complex and subtle but that the mixing of human and animal tissues and materials was not by itself objectionable. The President's Council accepted that the transplantation of animal parts to replace defective human ones could be considered as ethical. The Council had no overriding objection to the insertion of animal-derived genes or cells into a human body - or even into human fetuses. if you have not already subscribe to this youtube channel utoo b heavenbound www.youtube.com/utoobeheavenbound
Views: 126363 Utoo B Heavenbound
Bacterial Conjugation and Transduction
 
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Bacterial DNA can pass from one cell to another through the processes of conjugation and transduction. © 2012 Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc. http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/48203/bacteria
DNA Exchange: Transformation, Conjugation & Transduction – Microbiology | Lecturio
 
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This video “DNA Exchange: Transformation, Conjugation & Transduction” is part of the Lecturio course “Microbiology” ► WATCH the complete course on http://lectur.io/bacteriadnaexchange ► LEARN ABOUT: - Bacteria exchange DNA - Transformation - DNA from donor - Conjugation - Transduction (viruses) ► THE PROF: Your lecturer is Prof. Dr. Vincent Racaniello. He is teaching microbiology and immunology at Columbia University in New York City. He is a leading expert in the research of viruses and human diseases. Therefore Racaniello has served on the editorial boards of scientific journals, such as the Journal of Virology or PLOS Pathogens. Furthermore he was the 2015 president of the American Society for Virology. Beyond that he is editor of an online virology blog and co-producer of the podcasts Netcast This Week in Virology, This Week in Parasitism and This Week in Microbiology. ► LECTURIO is your single-point resource for medical school: Study for your classes, USMLE Step 1, USMLE Step 2, MCAT or MBBS with video lectures by world-class professors, recall & USMLE-style questions and textbook articles. Create your free account now: http://lectur.io/bacteriadnaexchange ► INSTALL our free Lecturio app iTunes Store: https://app.adjust.com/z21zrf Play Store: https://app.adjust.com/b01fak ► READ TEXTBOOK ARTICLES related to this video: Biology for Physicians: The Basics of Medical Microbiology http://lectur.io/bacteriatypesarticle ► SUBSCRIBE to our YouTube channel: http://lectur.io/subscribe ► WATCH MORE ON YOUTUBE: http://lectur.io/playlists ► LET’S CONNECT: • Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lecturio.medical.education.videos • Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/lecturio_medical_videos • Twitter: https://twitter.com/LecturioMed
Genetic Engineering and Diseases – Gene Drive & Malaria
 
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We have the choice to attack one of our oldest enemies with genetic engineering. But should we do it? Support us on Patreon so we can make more videos (and get cool stuff in return): https://www.patreon.com/Kurzgesagt?ty=h Kurzgesagt merch here: http://bit.ly/1P1hQIH Get the music of the video here: soundcloud: http://bit.ly/2cJQIsk bandcamp: http://bit.ly/2dj4np0 http://www.epic-mountain.com Big thanks to James Gurney and Roya Haghighat-Khah for their help and advice with this video! THANKS A LOT TO OUR LOVELY PATRONS FOR SUPPORTING US: Lucien Delbert, Mike C, Ricardo Chavarria, Juha Wellman, Zachary Jordan, Patrick Chang, Adrian Mihali, Nicodemos Nicodemou, Lacey Larson, Austin Earnest, Andre Wee, Koroslak, Alex Brady, Roberto Cano, Andreas Stokholm, Plamen Ivanov, E Smith, Kieran Hunter-East, Christopher Trinh, Tony Kwok, Adam Rabenstein, Andrew Whitehurst, Alena Vlachova, Mackenzie Broadbent, Andreas Hertle, Martin Petersen, Kasturi Raghavan, Gregory Griffin, KiaTheDead, Aaron Stevens, Jimmy C, Benedikt Jaletzke, Jonathan Bowler, Zdravko Šašek, Wouter Stokhof, Zealotus, Long Vu, Fatman13, Jeremy Dumet, Miles Spoor, Mirton I, Al Fl, Jonathan Carter, Stanislaw Wasowicz, Marek Turcani, Francisco Santos, Justin Choi, Dagoberto Chapa, Chip Salzenberg, TinFung, Bob Bergeron, Peer, Justin Elstrott, Rachid Malik, Octavio Astillo, Romain Isnel, Rich Sekmistrz, Kuosora, Mozart Petter, Justin Jeffries, Nicola Licheri, Bahram Malaekeh, Florent Petterschmitt, David Mark, Gaby Germanos, Shweta Bharadwai, Lux Stamm, Marc Johann, Joe, Nefaur Khandker, Anders Madsen, Sarah Yoshi, monoxide, Brandon Meador, Dovydas Bartkevicius, Tyler Vigen, Michael Niella, Gordon Timilty, Slava Dzyba, Bagel Krippen Chandra, KodinCage, Miikka Harjuntausta, Magid Elgady, Vince Houmes, Irae Carvalho, Josh Talbot, Mr.Z, Pawel Urbanek, Russ Clarke, Lucas Tostes, Oscar Chamaria, Zachary Langdon, Steve Bollenbaugh, Xiaogiang Zheng, Peter LoPinto, Jenny Nordenborg, Evan Faas, Greg Fowler, Cicmil Mladen, Canut Durgun, Malovich, Cedric, Dave Anderson, Jones, Elliot, Denis Dube, David Allen, Dawson Reid, Jake Zwirdowski, Denis Leu SOURCES AND FURTHER READING: Harvard FAQs on gene drive: http://bit.ly/1TYNIAo Research paper on using CRISPR for malaria gene drive: http://bit.ly/2cGXNqp Nature article on engineered mosquitos: http://go.nature.com/1Ij39yS STAT new article on using gene drive against Zika: http://bit.ly/2ctw24X Tech review article on using gene drive against malaria: http://bit.ly/1V0Qpr7 Smithsonian on deadliness of mosquitos: http://bit.ly/1sqQ1D7 Science article about the risks of the technology: http://bit.ly/2dgtpCt New Yorker on Pros and Cons: http://bit.ly/1PTKGlt Gates note on death rate through mosquitos: http://bit.ly/1UdvIqI Status quo on field trial in the U.S.: http://bit.ly/2b16ufu Evolution working against gene drive technology: http://theatln.tc/2cmMjau Research paper on evolution of resistance against gene drive: http://bit.ly/2cGWPKO Science news on possible safety feature for gene drive: http://bit.ly/29I0Z26 Help us caption & translate this video! http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_cs_panel?c=UCsXVk37bltHxD1rDPwtNM8Q&tab=2
DNA transformation in bacteria
 
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DNA transformation in bacteria - lecture explains the bacterial transformation process. http://shomusbiology.com/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.com/bio-materials.html Remember Shomu’s Biology is created to spread the knowledge of life science and biology by sharing all this free biology lectures video and animation presented by Suman Bhattacharjee in YouTube. All these tutorials are brought to you for free. Please subscribe to our channel so that we can grow together. You can check for any of the following services from Shomu’s Biology- Buy Shomu’s Biology lecture DVD set- www.shomusbiology.com/dvd-store Shomu’s Biology assignment services – www.shomusbiology.com/assignment -help Join Online coaching for CSIR NET exam – www.shomusbiology.com/net-coaching We are social. Find us on different sites here- Our Website – www.shomusbiology.com Facebook page- https://www.facebook.com/ShomusBiology/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/shomusbiology SlideShare- www.slideshare.net/shomusbiology Google plus- https://plus.google.com/113648584982732129198 LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/suman-bhattacharjee-2a051661 Youtube- https://www.youtube.com/user/TheFunsuman Thank you for watching In molecular biology transformation is genetic alteration of a cell resulting from the direct uptake, incorporation and expression of exogenous genetic material (exogenous DNA) from its surroundings and taken up through the cell membrane(s). Transformation occurs naturally in some species of bacteria, but it can also be effected by artificial means in other cells. For transformation to happen, bacteria must be in a state of competence, which might occur as a time-limited response to environmental conditions such as starvation and cell density. Transformation is one of three processes by which exogenous genetic material may be introduced into a bacterial cell, the other two being conjugation (transfer of genetic material between two bacterial cells in direct contact) and transduction (injection of foreign DNA by a bacteriophage virus into the host bacterium). "Transformation" may also be used to describe the insertion of new genetic material into nonbacterial cells, including animal and plant cells; however, because "transformation" has a special meaning in relation to animal cells, indicating progression to a cancerous state, the term should be avoided for animal cells when describing introduction of exogenous genetic material. Introduction of foreign DNA into eukaryotic cells is often called "transfection".[1] Source of the article published in description is Wikipedia. I am sharing their material. © by original content developers of Wikipedia. Link- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page Material source: Molecular Genetics of Bacteria Larry Snyder (Author), Joseph E. Peters (Author), Tina M. Henkin (Author), Wendy Champness (Author) Link: http://www.amazon.com/Molecular-Genetics-Bacteria-Larry-Snyder/dp/1555816274
Views: 45618 Shomu's Biology
Genetic recombination 1 | Biomolecules | MCAT | Khan Academy
 
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Created by Efrat Bruck. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/mcat/biomolecules/chromosomal-inheritance/v/genetic-recombination-2?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=mcat Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/mcat/biomolecules/chromosomal-inheritance/v/punnett-square-fun?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=mcat MCAT on Khan Academy: Go ahead and practice some passage-based questions! About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s MCAT channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDkK5wqSuwDlJ3_nl3rgdiQ?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 140973 khanacademymedicine
Heredity: Crash Course Biology #9
 
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Hank and his brother John discuss heredity via the gross example of relative ear wax moistness. Crash Course Biology is now available on DVD! http://dftba.com/product/1av/CrashCourse-Biology-The-Complete-Series-DVD-Set Like CrashCourse on Facebook! http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Follow CrashCourse on Twitter! http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse This video uses sounds from Freesound.org, a list of which can be found, along with the REFERENCES for this episode, in the Google document here: http://dft.ba/-2dlR tags: crashcourse, science, biology, evolution, genetics, heredity, aristotle, bloodlines, gregor mendel, mendelian genetics, mendelian trait, classical genetics, chromosome, gene, polygenic, pleiotropic, allele, ear wax gene, somatic, diploid, gametes, sperm, egg, haploid, polyploid, dominance, dominant, recessive, heterozygous, homozygous, phenotype, punnett square, reginald c. punnett, sex-linked inheritance, autosome Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 2768438 CrashCourse
Mechanisms that Increase Genetic Variation
 
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034 - Mechanisms that Increase Genetic Variation Paul Andersen describes mechanisms that increase the genetic variation within a population. He begins by discussing how horizontal transfer can move genetic material between bacteria. Transformation, transduction, and conjugation in bacteria are all included. He also explains how crossing over, random assortment, and random fertilization can maintain genetic variation i eukaryotes. He also explains how inbreeding can decrease the fitness of an individual. Do you speak another language? Help me translate my videos: http://www.bozemanscience.com/translations/ Intro Music Atribution Title: I4dsong_loop_main.wav Artist: CosmicD Link to sound: http://www.freesound.org/people/CosmicD/sounds/72556/ Creative Commons Atribution License All of the images are licensed under creative commons and public domain licensing: Boumphreyfr. English: Meiosis: Schematic Diagram of Crossover, June 2, 2009. Own work. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Meiosis_crossover.png. "File:Acrosome Reaction Diagram En.svg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed December 8, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Acrosome_reaction_diagram_en.svg. "File:Agar Plate with Colonies.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed December 8, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Agar_plate_with_colonies.jpg. "File:Basal Ganglia and Related Structures.svg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed December 8, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Basal_Ganglia_and_Related_Structures.svg. "File:Conjugation.svg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed December 8, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Conjugation.svg. "File:Coquina variation3.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia, March 28, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:Coquina_variation3.jpg&oldid=276893758. "File:DNA Orbit Animated Static Thumb.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed December 8, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:DNA_orbit_animated_static_thumb.png. "File:Griffith Experiment.svg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed December 8, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Griffith_experiment.svg. "File:Horizontal-Gene-Transfer.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed December 8, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Horizontal-gene-transfer.jpg. "File:Juan de Miranda Carreno 002.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed December 8, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Juan_de_Miranda_Carreno_002.jpg. "File:Sky Spectral Karyotype.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed December 8, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Sky_spectral_karyotype.png. "File:Transduction (genetics)en.svg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed December 8, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Transduction_(genetics)en.svg. Jakov, internationalization: PatríciaR Original image from NCBI; original vector version by. English: Overview of the Major Events in Meiosis (international Version). A: DNA Replication; B: Meiosis I; C: Meiosis II, March 4, 2009. File:MajorEventsInMeiosis variant.svg, which is a derivative work of an image found on NCBI. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:MajorEventsInMeiosis_variant_int.svg. version, Original uploader was Lec CRP1 at en wikipedia Later. English: The Ancestry of King en:Charles II of Spain (1661-1700), February 1, 2008. Transferred from en.wikipedia. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Carlos_segundo80.png.
Views: 97223 Bozeman Science
Gene transfer in Bacteria: Transformation, Transduction and Conjugation
 
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To view complete list of my lectures- https://goo.gl/A5Rtu5
Views: 2633 Online Study
Bacterial Conjugation - Transfer of the F Plasmid [HD Animation]
 
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Bacterial Conjugation - Transfer of the F Plasmid Animation ------------------------------- Please Like, comment, share and subscribe 👍🏻❤️
Views: 22373 McGraw-Hill Animations
Bacterial conjugation
 
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For more information, log on to- http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/bio-materials.html The prototypical conjugative plasmid is the F-plasmid, or F-factor.[1] The F-plasmid is an episome (a plasmid that can integrate itself into the bacterial chromosome by homologous recombination) with a length of about 100 kb. It carries its own origin of replication, the oriV, and an origin of transfer, or oriT.[4] There can only be one copy of the F-plasmid in a given bacterium, either free or integrated, and bacteria that possess a copy are called F-positive or F-plus (denoted F+). Cells that lack F plasmids are called F-negative or F-minus (F-) and as such can function as recipient cells. Among other genetic information the F-plasmid carries a tra and trb locus, which together are about 33 kb long and consist of about 40 genes. The tra locus includes the pilin gene and regulatory genes, which together form pili on the cell surface. The locus also includes the genes for the proteins that attach themselves to the surface of F- bacteria and initiate conjugation. Though there is some debate on the exact mechanism of conjugation it seems that the pili are not the structures through which DNA exchange occurs. This has been shown in experiments where the pilus are allowed to make contact, but then are denatured with SDS and yet DNA transformation still proceeds. Several proteins coded for in the tra or trb locus seem to open a channel between the bacteria and it is thought that the traD enzyme, located at the base of the pilus, initiates membrane fusion. When conjugation is initiated by a signal the relaxase enzyme creates a nick in one of the strands of the conjugative plasmid at the oriT. Relaxase may work alone or in a complex of over a dozen proteins known collectively as a relaxosome. In the F-plasmid system the relaxase enzyme is called TraI and the relaxosome consists of TraI, TraY, TraM and the integrated host factor IHF. The nicked strand, or T-strand, is then unwound from the unbroken strand and transferred to the recipient cell in a 5'-terminus to 3'-terminus direction. The remaining strand is replicated either independent of conjugative action (vegetative replication beginning at the oriV) or in concert with conjugation (conjugative replication similar to the rolling circle replication of lambda phage). Conjugative replication may require a second nick before successful transfer can occur. A recent report claims to have inhibited conjugation with chemicals that mimic an intermediate step of this second nicking event.[7] If the F-plasmid that is transferred has previously been integrated into the donor's genome some of the donor's chromosomal DNA may also be transferred with the plasmid DNA.[3] The amount of chromosomal DNA that is transferred depends on how long the two conjugating bacteria remain in contact. In common laboratory strains of E. coli the transfer of the entire bacterial chromosome takes about 100 minutes. The transferred DNA can then be integrated into the recipient genome via homologous recombination. A cell culture that contains in its population cells with non-integrated F-plasmids usually also contains a few cells that have accidentally integrated their plasmids. It is these cells that are responsible for the low-frequency chromosomal gene transfers that occur in such cultures. Some strains of bacteria with an integrated F-plasmid can be isolated and grown in pure culture. Because such strains transfer chromosomal genes very efficiently they are called Hfr (high frequency of recombination). The E. coli genome was originally mapped by interrupted mating experiments in which various Hfr cells in the process of conjugation were sheared from recipients after less than 100 minutes (initially using a Waring blender). The genes that were transferred were then investigated. Since integration of the F-plasmid into the E. coli chromosome is a rare spontaneous occurrence, and since the numerous genes promoting DNA transfer are in the plasmid genome rather than in the bacterial genome, it has been argued that conjugative bacterial gene transfer is not an evolutionary adaptation of the bacterial host, nor is it likely ancestral to eukaryotic sex.[8] Source of the article published in description is Wikipedia. I am sharing their material. © by original content developers of Wikipedia. Link- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page
Views: 15197 Shomu's Biology
Plasmids | Genetics | Biology
 
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To purchase this program please visit http://www.greatpacificmedia.com/ Segment from the program Biotechnology: Engineering Genomes. DVD Description Our Biotechnology DVD first looks at major research areas in biotechnology such as the Human Genome Project and the various forms of recombinant DNA technology that produce transgenic plants and animals. The program then goes on to look at the tools used by biotechnologists such as restriction enzymes, plasmids, vector and vector less insertion of genes into genomes, and the production of genes via polymerase chain reactions. The program then concludes by looking at the future of biotechnology and some of the environmental, economic, and ethical issues raised by biotech.
Views: 222507 greatpacificmedia
What is GENETIC RECOMBINATION? What does GENETIC RECOMBINATION mean? GENETIC RECOMBINATION meaning
 
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What is GENETIC RECOMBINATION? What does GENETIC RECOMBINATION mean? GENETIC RECOMBINATION meaning - GENETIC RECOMBINATION definition - GENETIC RECOMBINATION explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Genetic recombination is the production of offspring with combinations of traits that differ from those found in either parent. In eukaryotes, genetic recombination during meiosis can lead to a novel set of genetic information that can be passed on from the parents to the offspring. Most recombination is naturally occurring. During meiosis in eukaryotes, genetic recombination involves the pairing of homologous chromosomes. This may be followed by information transfer between the chromosomes. The information transfer may occur without physical exchange (a section of genetic material is copied from one chromosome to another, without the donating chromosome being changed) (see SDSA pathway in Figure); or by the breaking and rejoining of DNA strands, which forms new molecules of DNA (see DHJ pathway in Figure). Recombination may also occur during mitosis in eukaryotes where it ordinarily involves the two sister chromosomes formed after chromosomal replication. In this case, new combinations of alleles are not produced since the sister chromosomes are usually identical. In meiosis and mitosis, recombination occurs between similar molecules of DNA (homologs). In meiosis, non-sister homologous chromosomes pair with each other so that recombination characteristically occurs between non-sister homologues. In both meiotic and mitotic cells, recombination between homologous chromosomes is a common mechanism used in DNA repair. Genetic recombination and recombinational DNA repair also occurs in bacteria and archaea, which use asexual reproduction. Recombination can be artificially induced in laboratory (in vitro) settings, producing recombinant DNA for purposes including vaccine development. V(D)J recombination in organisms with an adaptive immune system is a type of site-specific genetic recombination that helps immune cells rapidly diversify to recognize and adapt to new pathogens.
Views: 709 The Audiopedia
DNA recombination basic
 
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DNA recombination process- lecture explains about the DNA recombination holiday junction & process. http://shomusbiology.com/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/bio-materials.html Genetic recombination is the production of new combinations of alleles, encoding a novel set of genetic information, e.g., by the pairing of homologous chromosomes in meiosis, or by the breaking and rejoining of DNA strands, which forms new molecules of DNA. This last type of recombination can occur between similar molecules of DNA, as in the homologous recombination of chromosomal crossover, or dissimilar molecules, as in non-homologous end joining. V(D)J recombination in organisms with an adaptive immune system is a type of genetic recombination that helps immune cells rapidly diversify to recognize and adapt to new pathogens. Recombination is a common method of DNA repair in both bacteria and eukaryotes. In eukaryotes, recombination also occurs in meiosis, where it facilitates chromosomal crossover. The crossover process leads to offspring's having different combinations of genes from those of their parents, and can occasionally produce new chimeric alleles. The shuffling of genes brought about by genetic recombination is thought to have many advantages, as it is a major engine of genetic variation and also allows sexually reproducing organisms to avoid Muller's ratchet, in which the genomes of an asexual population accumulate deleterious mutations in an irreversible manner. Chromosomal crossover refers to recombination between the paired chromosomes inherited from each of one's parents, generally occurring during meiosis. During prophase I the four available chromatids are in tight formation with one another. While in this formation, homologous sites on two chromatids can mesh with one another, and may exchange genetic information.[1] Because recombination can occur with small probability at any location along chromosome, the frequency of recombination between two locations depends on their distance. Therefore, for genes sufficiently distant on the same chromosome the amount of crossover is high enough to destroy the correlation between alleles. Tracking the movement of genes during crossovers has proven quite useful to geneticists. Because two genes that are close together are less likely to become separated than genes that are farther apart, geneticists can deduce roughly how far apart two genes are on a chromosome if they know the frequency of the crossovers. Geneticists can also use this method to infer the presence of certain genes. Genes that typically stay together during recombination are said to be linked. One gene in a linked pair can sometimes be used as a marker to deduce the presence of another gene. This is typically used in order to detect the presence of a disease-causing gene.[2] Source of the article published in description is Wikipedia. I am sharing their material. © by original content developers of Wikipedia. Link- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page Material source: Molecular Biology of the Gene (4th Edition) James D. Watson (Author), Alan M. Weiner (Author), Nancy H. Hopkins (Author) Link: http://www.amazon.com/Molecular-Biology-Gene-4th-Edition/dp/0805396144
Views: 87873 Shomu's Biology
GENETICS 2: TRANSFORMATION
 
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TRANSFORMATION
Views: 1721 Walter Jahn
Genetic Transfer - part 1
 
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Microbial populations achieve genetic diversity through horizontal gene transfer. Bacteria may transfer genes from one to another by conjugation, transformation, or transduction. Scientists often exploit these processes through recombinant DNA.
Views: 144402 Elias Haroun
Gene conversion - Jim Haber (Brandeis)
 
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https://www.ibiology.org/genetics-and-gene-regulation/mechanisms-dna-repair/#part-1 Gene conversion is the most common form of double strand break repair in yeast and mammalian cells.
Views: 28641 iBiology Techniques
How The Stock Exchange Works (For Dummies)
 
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Why are there stocks at all? Everyday in the news we hear about the stock exchange, stocks and money moving around the globe. Still, a lot of people don't have an idea why we have stock markets at all, because the topic is usually very dry. We made a short video about the basics of the stock exchanges. With robots. Robots are kewl! Short videos, explaining things. For example Evolution, the Universe, the Stock Market or controversial topics like Fracking. Because we love science. We would love to interact more with you, our viewers to figure out what topics you want to see. If you have a suggestion for future videos or feedback, drop us a line! :) We're a bunch of Information designers from munich, visit us on facebook or behance to say hi! https://www.facebook.com/Kurzgesagt https://www.behance.net/kurzgesagt How the Stock Exchange works Help us caption & translate this video! http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_cs_panel?c=UCsXVk37bltHxD1rDPwtNM8Q&tab=2
Microbiology Journal Club - Barriers to genetic exchange in Myxococcus
 
01:10:05
The study of social behavior and self recognition in bacteria gives us a fascinating view into the complex social lives of these single-celled organisms. The bacterium Myxococcus xanthus exhibits a range of social behaviors, including predation on other bacteria and the formation of multicellular fruiting bodies under starvation conditions. In this paper, the authors explore genomic divergence in Myxococcus strains isolated from the same small patch of soil and present evidence of a barrier to genetic exchange. What does this mean for self/non-self discrimination in Myxococcus? Is this the beginnings of a speciation event? Join us April 25 at 3 pm to discuss! All are welcome. Link to join the Hangout will be posted at about 2:45 pm on April 25 at gplusmicrojc.wordpress.com.
Transformation in Bacteria
 
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Transformation in Bacteria
Views: 173146 Soner Efe
Gene Transfer Conjugation F Factor plasmid
 
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In this video I talk about the second type of gene transfer conjugation or bacterial sex. I go over what conjugation is and give examples of the various donors such as F+, Hfr, and F'. I also show the results of the crosses between these donors and F- cell which does not have the f factor plasmid.
Views: 9938 FortuneFavorsPrep
Gene Exchange
 
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A quick rundown of the diversity of mechanisms where nucleic acid can be obtained by cells either reciprocally or non-reciprocally.
Views: 83 BiologyasPoetry
Bacterial Transduction and Transformation mnemonic technique to memorize
 
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Transformation is the process by which a DNA molecule is taken up from the external environment and incorporated into the genome of the recipient cell. Allows for Recombinant DNA Technology. Involves use of plasmids.. Transduction Involves transfer genetic material from one bacterium to another by a bacteriophage. Acting as a vector, the virus carries its own genome plus a fragment of DNA from the bacterium it has recently infected. If the host bacterium survives the viral attack, recombination may occur. Bacterial conjugation is the temporary direct contact between two bacterial cells leading to an exchange of genetic material (DNA). This exchange is unidirectional, i.e. one bacterial cell is the donor of DNA and the other is the recipient. In this way, genes are transferred laterally amongst existing bacterial as opposed to vertical gene transfer in which genes are passed on to offspring.
Gene Transfer between bacteria via Transformation
 
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#RHSBMS #PLTW students model and explain how bacteria acquire new genes via #transformation
Views: 154 Heidi Hisrich
Bacterial Genetic Transduction
 
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This video discusses the process of genetic transduction Submitted by: Atienza, Andrea Icaro, Kyle Ramos, Rollene Copy Right Intended.
Views: 3505 Kyle Icaro
F Hfr
 
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This movie is made by Dr Nguyen Thanh Cong working at the Agricultural Genetics Institute in Hanoi, VIETNAM Address below: Dr Nguyen Thanh Cong Molecular Biology Laboratory Agricultural Genetics Institute Vien Di truyen Nong Nghiep Tuliem, Hanoi VIETNAM
Views: 93781 congthanhng
Generalized transduction vs Specialized Transduction
 
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Generalized transduction vs specialized transduction - lecture explains about the difference between generalized and specialized transduction. Generalised transduction is mediated by lytic phages where any DNA segment can be transferred by the virus and may not integrate the segment to the bacterial chromosome. while specialized transduction is a process where a fragment of bacterial DNA packaged inside the phage head that is transferred to another bacteria. Watch this video lecture to understand the fifference between generalized and specialized transduction. For more information, log on to- http://www.shomusbiology.com/ Get Shomu's Biology DVD set here- http://www.shomusbiology.com/dvd-store/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.com/bio-materials.html Remember Shomu’s Biology is created to spread the knowledge of life science and biology by sharing all this free biology lectures video and animation presented by Suman Bhattacharjee in YouTube. All these tutorials are brought to you for free. Please subscribe to our channel so that we can grow together. You can check for any of the following services from Shomu’s Biology- Buy Shomu’s Biology lecture DVD set- www.shomusbiology.com/dvd-store Shomu’s Biology assignment services – www.shomusbiology.com/assignment -help Join Online coaching for CSIR NET exam – www.shomusbiology.com/net-coaching We are social. Find us on different sites here- Our Website – www.shomusbiology.com Facebook page- https://www.facebook.com/ShomusBiology/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/shomusbiology SlideShare- www.slideshare.net/shomusbiology Google plus- https://plus.google.com/113648584982732129198 LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/suman-bhattacharjee-2a051661 Youtube- https://www.youtube.com/user/TheFunsuman Thank you for watching
Views: 77394 Shomu's Biology
simple23 Genetic Data Exchange Manfred Sternberg
 
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simple23 manfred sternberg
Views: 93 Manfred Sternberg
bacterial transformation
 
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In molecular biology transformation is the genetic alteration of a cell resulting from the direct uptake, incorporation and expression of exogenous genetic material (exogenous DNA) from its surrounding and taken up through the cell membrane(s). Transformation occurs most commonly in bacteria and in some species occurs naturally. Transformation can also be effected by artificial means. Bacteria that are capable of being transformed, whether naturally or artificially, are called competent. Transformation is one of three processes by which exogenous genetic material may be introduced into bacterial cell, the other two being conjugation (transfer of genetic material between two bacterial cells in direct contact), and transduction (injection of foreign DNA by a bacteriophage into the host). Transformation may also used to describe the insertion of new genetic material into nonbacterial cells including animal and plant cells, however, because transformation has a special meaning in relation to animal cells indicating progression to a cancerous state, the term should be avoided for animal cells when describing introduction of exogenous genetic material. Introduction of foreign DNA into eukaryotic cells is usually called "transfection".
Views: 65596 zabaaz
AP Biology Lab 6: Molecular Biology
 
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Paul Andersen explains the two major portions of the molecular biology lab in AP Biology. He starts by discussing the process of transformation. He explains how you can use the pGLO plasmid to produce glowing E. coli bacteria. He then describes how you can use restriction enzymes and the process of gel electrophoresis to cut and separate DNA. Intro Music Atribution Title: I4dsong_loop_main.wav Artist: CosmicD Link to sound: http://www.freesound.org/people/CosmicD/sounds/72556/ Creative Commons Atribution License
Views: 210829 Bozeman Science
What Are You?
 
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What Are You? So. Are you your body? And if so, how exactly does this work? Lets explore lots of confusing questions. This video is part of a collaboration with CGPGrey. Check out his video here: http://bit.ly/1sphjx2 Support us on Patreon so we can make more videos (and get cool stuff): https://www.patreon.com/Kurzgesagt?ty=h Kurzgesagt merch here: http://bit.ly/1P1hQIH Get the music of the video here: soundcloud:http://bit.ly/22vkC1X bandcamp: http://bit.ly/1UqRN3i http://www.epic-mountain.com THANKS A LOT TO OUR LOVELY PATRONS FOR SUPPORTING US: Nicoleta, Timothy Pifer, Thomas Junier, Sam Posnick, Muhammad Fikri, Michael Wawra, Matt Welch, Nuno Tiago, Leigh Beattie, Erik Onnen, Jonathan Häberle, Adit Kadkol, Benson Hawk, Geraint Scott, Alex Söres, Jake Sobrist, Mark Jobes, Bueno, Pierce Ferriter, Bacon Fat Labs, Raphael Grund, BEn Gazzard, Zurxo, Lovelyn Sapuay, David Enrique Erazo Robles, Matt Carol, Eirik Wilhelm Hamborg, Franco B, Jaroslav Stehlik, John Richardson, Jon R, Jack Hong, Lino Coscia, Kahu Coyle-Puke, Вадим Росток, Aaron Rabenstein, Gamblord, Benjamin Achren, Giorgi, Michael Lee, Jeremy, Spencer Egan, Vitor Gondim Tomaz, Michael Komorowski, Joshua Dittrich, Nawapat Kaweeyanum, Jeffrey McCullough, Nick Longe What Are You? Help us caption & translate this video! http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_cs_panel?c=UCsXVk37bltHxD1rDPwtNM8Q&tab=2
The Mechanism of Transformation with Competent Cells
 
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Transformation is the process by which bacteria are made to take up exogenous DNA. Learn more about transformation and how it is used in cloning workflows. Learn more at https://www.neb.com/applications/cloning-and-synthetic-biology/transformation
Views: 107270 New England Biolabs
The Antibiotic Apocalypse Explained
 
05:58
What is the Antibiotic Apocalypse? What is it all about? And how dangerous is it? Kurzgesagt MERCH! http://bit.ly/1P1hQIH Support us on Patreon so we can make more stuff (and get cool wallpapers): https://www.patreon.com/Kurzgesagt?ty=h Get the music of the video here: Soundcloud: http://bit.ly/1Lqpa69 Bandcamp: http://bit.ly/1pnWMqG Epic Mountain Music: http://bit.ly/22k7EYF THANKS A LOT TO OUR LOVELY PATRONS FOR SUPPORTING US: Sara Priselac, Eric, José Díez, Antonie Coetzee, Julien Dubois, Mert Tekin, Reno, Ran Moneta, Terry Breen-Smith, Azri Rostam, Guy Nicholson, DeAdrean Martin, Ty Cook, Wes Blind, Marc Stein, Mathias Højbjerg, Rustan Curman, Christopher Homs, Selene Kwan, Nikita, Jamie Buch, Yong-Bi Jo, Charles Cartwrighte, Steven Ferrari, Logan Kent, Danimal, Matthias Gyllenvarg, Kieran Keegan, Jai Kowalik, Chad Mellor, Karla Brilman, Daniel Dchuette, Lindsey Skouras, Allan Lehamnn Kristensen, Michael DeFreitas, James Wiles, Brian Lathrop, Kyle Sayers, Zack, Touki Wawa Wang, David Campos, Conner Fissell, Atlas Moon, Trevor Kam, Anon, Jan Sundgaard Schultz, Andrew Wissam Chidiac Cherian The Antibiotic Apocalypse Explained Help us caption & translate this video! http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_cs_panel?c=UCsXVk37bltHxD1rDPwtNM8Q&tab=2
What Is A Genetic Recombination?
 
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29 nov 2017 genetic recombination occurs when genetic material is exchanged between two different chromosomes or between different regions within the same chromosome. Most prokaryotic species don't participate in sexual reproduction and have only one copy of each gene on their single lonely chromosome. The process involves the basic facts such as two double stranded dna molecules that have regions of very similar (homologous) sequence come together so their homologous sequences are in tandem 25 apr 2017 prokaryotes bacteria don't much a sex life. Advantages of genetic recombination biology libretexts. Most recombination is naturally occurring dna involves the exchange of genetic material either between multiple chromosomes or different regions same chromosome. We can observe it in both eukaryotes (like animals and plants) prokaryotes archaea bacteria) genetic recombination is the transmission process by which combinations of alleles observed at different loci two parental individuals become shuffled offspring. Genetic recombination and crossing over thoughtco. Khan academy genetic recombination and gene mapping youtube. Genetic recombination new world encyclopedia. One of the major questions in recombination relates to mechanism by which exchange genetic information is initiated. Genetic recombination happens during meiosis, a special type of cell division that occurs. Genetic recombination wikipedia genetic is the production of offspring with combinations traits that differ from those found in either parent. Department of biology memorial university newfoundland. This process is generally mediated by homology; That is, homologous regions of chromosomes line up in preparation for exchange, and some degree sequence 28 jan 2015. More technically put, genetic recombination is the transmission process by which combinations of alleles any a number 15 apr 2013 most important form homologous. Recombination involves the cutting and covalent joining of dna sequences. It makes new combinations of alleles along chromosomes, and it restricts the effects mutations largely to region around a gene, not whole bacteria have no sexual reproduction in sense that eukaryotes dono alternation diploid haploid generationsno meiosis. Mitosis leads to cell proliferation and is essential for asexual reproduction including 1) mitotic division of unicellular organisms, 2) budding offspring from the while genes determine most our physical characteristics, exact combination we inherit, thus traits, in part due a process chromosomes undergo, known as genetic recombination. Three mechanisms of genetic recombination in prokaryotes explain what is, why it is important and ho sexual reproduction, meiosis. In eukaryotes, genetic recombination during meiosis can lead to a novel set of information that be passed on from the parents offspring. But the essence of sex is genetic recombination, and bacteria do have three mechanisms to accomplish that transformationtransduction recombin
Views: 91 Roselyn Wnuk Tipz
What Is The Genetic Definition Of A Species?
 
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We define a genetic species as a group of genetically compatible interbreeding natural populations that is genetically isolated from other such groups. This focus on genetic isolation rather than reproductive isolation distinguishes the Genetic Species Concept from the Biological Species Concept. Biodiversity is the shorter form of word biological species definition. This is an example of where additional studies are needed to determine if 2 biological species 1 nov 2013 biodiversity defined as 'the variety and variability among all groups living organisms the ecosystems in which they occur. Genetic species concept cytochrome b sequences and environmental studies biodiversity genetic, species, ecosystem diversity seafdec aqd. The manifestations of all types diversities are found at these levels organisms. A species is a group of organisms that share genetic heritage, are able to interbreed, and create offspring also fertile. There is gene flow among individuals within a species, but not between different species. Genetic species concept. Genetic species concept speciation in mammals and the genetic concept ncbi. We define a genetic species as group of genetically compatible interbreeding natural populations that is isolated from other such groups. Several authors have adopted carson's a biological species is group of organisms that can reproduce with one another in nature and produce fertile offspring. The book popularized the work of population genetics to other biologists, and influenced their defining a species. Different species are separated from each other by reproductive barriers. The first level is pure information finding out what going on genetically with endangered species that have small populations or special vulnerabilities, such as to disease. This lack of gene exchange means that different species can they delimit differently. Speciation in mammals and the genetic species concept. Individuals belonging to a species share, by definition, certain in biology, is one of the basic units biological classification. Googleusercontent search. Genetic diversity refers to the differences in genetic make up between distinct species and variations within a single. This means genetics and the origin of species is a 1937 book by ukrainian american evolutionary biologist theodosius dobzhansky. A species is often defined as a group of individuals that actually or potentially interbreed in nature. Genetic diversity a species with different genetic genes and of the molecules making up is immense much larger than number individuals. Why we need a new genetic species concept jstor. Genetic species concepts define in terms of gene exchange. This focus on genetic isolation rather than reproductive distinguishes the species concept from biological within this definition, a represents set of individuals connected by gene exchange ('gene flow') that is genetically isolated all other such sets. It is regarded as one of the most important works modern syn
What is HUMAN GENETIC VARIATION? What does HUMAN GENETIC VARIATION mean?
 
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What is HUMAN GENETIC VARIATION? What does HUMAN GENETIC VARIATION mean? HUMAN GENETIC VARIATION meaning - HUMAN GENETIC VARIATION definition - HUMAN GENETIC VARIATION explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Human genetic variation is the genetic differences both within and among populations. There may be multiple variants of any given gene in the human population (genes), leading to polymorphism. Many genes are not polymorphic, meaning that only a single allele is present in the population: the gene is then said to be fixed. On average, in terms of DNA sequence all humans are 99.5% similar to any other humans. No two humans are genetically identical. Even monozygotic twins, who develop from one zygote, have infrequent genetic differences due to mutations occurring during development and gene copy-number variation. Differences between individuals, even closely related individuals, are the key to techniques such as genetic fingerprinting. Alleles occur at different frequencies in different human populations, with populations that are more geographically and ancestrally remote tending to differ more. Causes of differences between individuals include independent assortment, the exchange of genes (crossing over and recombination) during meiosis and various mutational events. There are at least two reasons why genetic variation exists between populations. Natural selection may confer an adaptive advantage to individuals in a specific environment if an allele provides a competitive advantage. Alleles under selection are likely to occur only in those geographic regions where they confer an advantage. The second main cause of genetic variation is due to the high degree of neutrality of most mutations. Most mutations do not appear to have any selective effect one way or the other on the organism. The main cause is genetic drift, this is the effect of random changes in the gene pool. In humans, founder effect and past small population size (increasing the likelihood of genetic drift) may have had an important influence in neutral differences between populations. The theory that humans recently migrated out of Africa supports this. The study of human genetic variation has both evolutionary significance and medical applications. It can help scientists understand ancient human population migrations as well as how different human groups are biologically related to one another. For medicine, study of human genetic variation may be important because some disease-causing alleles occur more often in people from specific geographic regions. New findings show that each human has on average 60 new mutations compared to their parents. Apart from mutations, many genes that may have aided humans in ancient times plague humans today. For example, it is suspected that genes that allow humans to more efficiently process food are those that make people susceptible to obesity and diabetes today.
Views: 3706 The Audiopedia

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