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How Exchange Rates Work
 
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● We explain topics simply. So Subscribe if you want to learn while being entertained. ✔ Please like the video and comment if you enjoyed - it helps a lot! ▶ If you want a question answered then ask in the comments and we may make a video about it! About the video: You may have traveled a lot and wondered why you get more of one currency when you exchange it for another. If so, you have witnessed exchange rates in action, but do you know how they work? Watch the video to find out what exchange rates are, how to convert between them and the different systems which determine a currencies exchange rate. Historically the gold standard system had been used, which fixed currency to a select value of gold, held in a vault. The three main systems are the floating, managed and fixed exchange rate systems. The floating system has minimal government intervention, using supply and demand to determine the exchange rate. The managed exchange rate is allowed to be within a permitted band and a fixed exchange rate is usually pegged to a currency with the interest of being competitive in the international market. The video explains this in more detail and with helpful picture to guide you through the subject.
Views: 418123 SimplyExplain
#72, Foreign exchange rate (Class 12 macroeconomics)
 
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Class 12 macroeconomics ..... Foreign exchange rate.... Foreign exchange.... Types of foreign exchange rate ..... Depreciation and appreciation of currency.... Contact for my book 7690041256 Economics on your tips video 72 Our books are now available on Amazon Special Combo - Economics on your tips Micro + Macro http://amzn.in/d/eSxj5Ui Economics on your tips Macroeconomics http://amzn.in/d/2AMX85O Economics on your tips Microeconomics http://amzn.in/d/cZykZVK Official series of playlists UG courses ( bcom, bba, bca, ba, honours) – https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLgC10_Xv-BGirAqOr-hU8e-N_Nz0UpgJ- Micro economics complete course – https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLgC10_Xv-BGg5n3YU6oEV7_HIzBuEbbOz Macro economics complete course- https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLgC10_Xv-BGg2ORORpILqiDR1gyH3MkXw Statistics complete course- https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLgC10_Xv-BGjrAkDyeMioJ7DEexAEeVdt National income – https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLgC10_Xv-BGjpE-1V4uz_0wvvbZQnSsj_ In order to promote us and help us grow Paytm on - 7690041256
Views: 387795 Economics on your tips
What is an Exchange Rate?
 
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Welcome to the Investors Trading Academy talking glossary of financial terms and events. Our word of the day is “Exchange Rate”. Exchange rate is the value at which one currency may be converted into another. The exchange rate is used when simply converting one currency to another such as for the purposes of travel to another country, or for engaging in speculation or trading in the foreign exchange market. There are a wide variety of factors which influence the exchange rate, such as interest rates, inflation, and the state of politics and the economy in each country. In finance, an exchange rate also known as a foreign-exchange rate, forex rate, FX rate between two currencies is the rate at which one currency will be exchanged for another. It is also regarded as the value of one country’s currency in terms of another currency. For example, an interbank exchange rate of 91 Japanese yen to the United States dollar means that 91 yen will be exchanged for each US dollar or that one US dollar will be exchanged for each 91 yen. Exchange rates are determined in the foreign exchange market, which is open to a wide range of different types of buyers and sellers where currency trading is continuous: 24 hours a day except weekends. The spot exchange rate refers to the current exchange rate. The forward exchange rate refers to an exchange rate that is quoted and traded today but for delivery and payment on a specific future date. In the retail currency exchange market, a different buying rate and selling rate will be quoted by money dealers. Most trades are to or from the local currency. The buying rate is the rate at which money dealers will buy foreign currency, and the selling rate is the rate at which they will sell the currency. The quoted rates will incorporate an allowance for a dealer's margin (or profit) in trading, or else the margin may be recovered in the form of a "commission" or in some other way. By Barry Norman, Investors Trading Academy
Imports, Exports, and Exchange Rates: Crash Course Economics #15
 
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What is a trade deficit? Well, it all has to do with imports and exports and, well, trade. This week Jacob and Adriene walk you through the basics of imports, exports, and exchange. So, you remember the specialization and trade thing, right? So, that leads to imports and exports. Economically, in the aggregate, this is usually a good thing. Globalization and free trade do tend to increase overall wealth. But not everybody wins. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Eric Kitchen, Jessica Wode, Jeffrey Thompson, Steve Marshall, Moritz Schmidt, Robert Kunz, Tim Curwick, Jason A Saslow, SR Foxley, Elliot Beter, Jacob Ash, Christian, Jan Schmid, Jirat, Christy Huddleston, Daniel Baulig, Chris Peters, Anna-Ester Volozh, Ian Dundore, Caleb Weeks -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 980076 CrashCourse
(Macro) Episode 33: Exchange Rates
 
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How do currency values rise and fall? Why would a country want to manipulate the value of its own currency? "(Macro) Episode 33: Exchange Rates" by Dr. Mary J. McGlasson is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.
Views: 223556 mjmfoodie
Currency Appreciation & Depreciation - How it Affects the Economy | Economics
 
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In this video we will learn what is Rupee appreciation and depreciation. It is also referred to as currency devaluation and revaluation. You must have read it in the newspaper that rupee has become stronger or weaker or crashed or gained some points against the American dollar. All of this simply means that the value of rupee has either increased or decreased against the American Dollar. This topic is part of Macroeconomics. Currency Appreciation & Depreciation has a huge affect on a nation's economy. It drives Foreign Direct Investment FDI, increases foreign reserves and it also affects a country's import and export. Fill this feedback form for a better learning experience https://goo.gl/vrYPBw Click here if you want to subscribe https://www.youtube.com/user/TheRealSengupta Maps and sketches can be found on the instagram account search for "geographysimple"
Views: 26127 Amit Sengupta
Fixed exchange rates
 
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In this video you will learn how fixed exchange rate systems work, their advantages and disadvantages and what is meant by devaluation and revaluation.
Views: 5729 EnhanceTuition
What is Exchange Rate : Explained with Animation
 
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This Video Explains the following: 1)Exchange Rates. 2)Why the value of Currency Fluctuates. 3)How the value of a currency is decided. 4)How Demand of Goods influences the Value of a Currency. For More Animated Explanations under 5 minutes, Subscribe to Science Digest. (Suggestions/Errors, please let us know. We appreciate it.)
Views: 73073 Science Digest
Why does a currency fall or rise? Quick Economics Class with the USD/JPY
 
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FX Market Strategist for TradersWay Wayne McDonell talks about the quantitive of money and the quantitate value of a currency. Purchasing power? Supply and demand? Quick economic class with Wayne McDonell taking the Japanese Yen as sample. Watch the full webinar: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hgnz6f_Spz8
Views: 4719 FXStreet
How Interest Rates Affect the Market
 
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Investors should observe the Federal Reserve’s funds rate, which is the cost banks pay to borrow from Federal Reserve banks. What's going on with Japan's interest rates? Read here: http://www.investopedia.com/articles/investing/012916/bank-japan-announces-negative-interest-rates.asp?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=youtube_desc_link
Views: 81738 Investopedia
Who sets the exchange rate?
 
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The exchange rate for the pound is determined by supply and demand – it is not set by the Bank of England. To find out more about the exchange rate and how it affects you, visit our guide here: http://edu.bankofengland.co.uk/knowledgebank/does-the-bank-of-england-set-the-exchange-rate/
Views: 8358 Bank of England
What gives a dollar bill its value? - Doug Levinson
 
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View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/what-gives-a-dollar-bill-its-value-doug-levinson The value of money is determined by how much (or how little) of it is in circulation. But who makes that decision, and how does their choice affect the economy at large? Doug Levinson takes a trip into the United States Federal Reserve, examining how the people who work there aim to balance the value of the dollar to prevent inflation or deflation. Lesson by Doug Levinson, animation by Qa'ed Mai.
Views: 2040877 TED-Ed
How rupee-dollar rates are determined? Hindi Video
 
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In this short animation video, we have explained that how currency exchange rate of Indian Rupees is determined with other foreign currencies? To watch more amazing video of general knowledge in Hindi visit our website http://netpill.in -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Watch our new video "Historical story of Padmavati :: Conflict of two Emperors" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=23G5Hb9lyZ8 -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Views: 452076 Netpill
Exchange Rate Determination
 
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Free app! Access all videos on this channel by putting myapp.is/Economics%20Diagrams into your phone browser and follow the instructions This video looks at how exchange rates are determined through the supply and demand of a currency in the Foreign Exchange (FOREX) market
Views: 44858 Steve Lobsey
What is Foreign Exchange in Hindi विदेशी विनिमय क्या है,क्यों रूपए की कीमत डॉलर के बराबर नहीं होती?
 
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Foreign Exchange. Foreign exchange, or Forex, or FX is the conversion of one currency into that of another. Foreign exchange markets The foreign exchange market (Forex, FX, or currency market) is a global decentralized or over-the-counter (OTC) market for the trading of currencies. It includes all aspects of buying, selling and exchanging currencies at current or determined prices. The main participants in this market are the larger international banks and  various Financial centres. Exchange rate An exchange rate is the rate at which one currency will be exchanged for another. It is also regarded as the value of one country’s currency in relation to another currency. For example, an RBI exchange rate of 64 Indian Rupee  to the United States dollar means that ₹64 will be exchanged for each US $1 or that US$1 will be exchanged for each ₹64. Spot Exchange Rate - The spot exchange rate refers to the current exchange rate. The forward exchange rate-  The forward exchange rate refers to an exchange rate that is quoted and traded today but for delivery and payment on a specific future date. 1 Fixed Exchange Rate 2 Floating Exchange Rate Factors That Influence Exchange Rates Balance Of Payment. Interest Rates Inflation Rate Foreign Reserves Devaluation Of Currency Etc..
Views: 14669 Know Economics
How Does China Manipulate Its Currency?
 
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» Subscribe to NowThis World: http://go.nowth.is/World_Subscribe With about $400 billion in debt and a broken economy, Greece is in trouble. But, how did Greece end up with such a high debt, and who do they owe money to? Learn More: Greece's Debt Due: What Greece Owes When http://graphics.wsj.com/greece-debt-timeline/ "Greece is negotiating with its eurozone creditors to get more aid before the indebted government runs out of cash." Explaining the Greek Debt Crisis http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/09/business/international/explaining-the-greek-debt-crisis.html "Greece, the weak link in the eurozone, is struggling to pay its debt as its people and its creditors grow more restive." Greek debts: what does it owe? When will the money run out? http://www.theguardian.com/business/2015/apr/24/greek-debts-what-does-it-owe-when-will-the-money-run-out "Crunch talks between Greece and its eurozone creditors are under way, but investors are growing increasingly sceptical that the country can reach an agreement on reforms and unlock the aid it needs from international lenders to avoid a debt default." Greek debt crisis: Who has most to lose? http://money.cnn.com/2015/01/28/investing/greek-debt-who-has-most-to-lose/ "Greece and its international lenders have embarked on a battle over the country's staggering debt." Watch More: What Happens If A Country Goes Bankrupt? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3PZDLG-rtGs&list=UUgRvm1yLFoaQKhmaTqXk9SA _________________________ NowThis World is dedicated to bringing you topical explainers about the world around you. Each week we’ll be exploring current stories in international news, by examining the facts, providing historical context, and outlining the key players involved. We’ll also highlight powerful countries, ideologies, influential leaders, and ongoing global conflicts that are shaping the current landscape of the international community across the globe today. More from NowThis: » Subscribe to NowThis News: http://go.nowth.is/News_Subscribe » Like NowThis World on Facebook: https://go.nowth.is/World_Facebook » Connect with Judah: Follow @judah_robinson on Twitter – Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeJudah » Connect with Versha: Follow @versharma on Twitter – Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeVersha http://www.youtube.com/nowthisworld Special thanks to Lissette Padilla for hosting TestTube! Check Lissette out on Twitter:https://twitter.com/lizzette
Views: 286292 NowThis World
How Does The Rate of Dollar Increase or Decrease in Urdu Hindi
 
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In This Video, we'll Learn About How Does The Rate of Dollar Increase or Decrease in Urdu Hindi __/LINKS\_ ► Twitter:➜ https://twitter.com/KnowledgeFacto1 ► Facebook:➜ https://www.facebook.com/Knowledgfactory Don't Forget To Subscribe Our YouTube Channel.
Views: 361512 knowldge Factory
Why is Rupee falling against US Dollar?
 
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"Why does dollar price go up and down?". He explained me the reason. I am going to simplify same explaination here. Lets assume there are only two international traders between India and US. - Mr Patel in Mumbai who supplies Diamond Jewelry to a store in New York. - Mr. Brown in Chicago who supplies Industrial Robots in Noida. Assume dollar price today is 45 rupees. Today Patel sold 10 piece Jewelry set to NY store, cost of each piece was 1000 dollars. Total selling amount = 10,000 dollars. Now Patel wants to convert 10,000 dollars to Rupees. If rate is 45 rupees to 1 US dollar. After conversion Patel should get 4.5 Lakh rupees. Same evening Mr. Brown from Chicago, sells one industrial robot in Noida for Rs. 2.25 lakhs. As per 45 rupees to dollar rate, Brown is expecting to convert Rs. 2.25 lakhs to 5000 US dollars. So we have -- 10,000 US dollars to be converted to rupees. [After conversion worth Rs. 4.5 Lakhs] -- Rs. 2.25 Lakhs to be converted to dollars [After conversion worth 5000 US dollars] We have a problem. Demand for Rupees is more than that for dollars. In other words for this particular trading day, there seems to be more supply of dollars than that of rupees. Patel and Brown log to Foreign Exchange website to convert their currency. First 5000 dollars gets exchanged easily. And the rate is Rs. 45 to 1 US dollars. Brown is happy he got his 2.25 lakhs converted to 5000 US dollars, he logs out of website and goes home. Patel still has more 5000 US dollars to convert in to Rupees. He got some money on credit from a friend and promised to return him on time with small interest fee. Patel also wants to pay salary to karigar (people on manufacturing floor) who manufactured jewelry for him. Patel is now desperate to convert remaining 5000 dollars to rupees. Lets add one more character in to story now. Mr Desai who runs a Travel Agency and organises tours to countries like UK, USA, Asia etc. He logs to website and sees someone waiting to exchange 5000 US dollars to rupees. Desai knows that he will need US dollars sometime next month and was looking to buy some at good price. He offers a bargain. Last price for dollar was 45 rupees, but if someone sells dollars for 43 rupees, I will buy it. Patel being in rush, agrees to sell dollars for lower price. Patel converts remaining 5000 US dollars at rate of 43 rupees. 5000 x 43 = 2.15 lakhs. Patel doesn't mind loosing small amount because he will able to make payments on time. Now latest Exchange rate is: Rs. 43 to 1 US dollar. After few weeks , Desai (Travel agent) gets a big contract to organise tour for a group of 100 people. He needs lot of dollars, he logs in to website and sees Patel ready to sell 10,000 dollars for 47 rupees. Desai desperately needs dollars, he buys it. Now excahnge rate is: Rs. 47 to 1 US dollar.
Views: 373101 MumbaiPav
What is Inflation?
 
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Economists constantly refer to inflation and tend to suggest it is a Very Bad Thing. But why exactly, where does it come from and what could one do to tame it? Please subscribe here: http://tinyurl.com/o28mut7 If you like our films take a look at our shop (we ship worldwide): http://www.theschooloflife.com/shop/all/ Brought to you by http://www.theschooloflife.com Produced in collaboration with Vale Productions http://www.valeproductions.co.uk Music Lanquidity by http://www.purple-planet.com #TheSchoolOfLife
Views: 739551 The School of Life
What is the Gold Standard? - Learn Liberty
 
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Before 1974, U.S. dollars were backed by gold. This meant that the federal government could not print more money than it could redeem for gold. Learn more: http://bit.ly/1HVAtKP. While this constrained the federal government, it also provided citizens with a relatively stable purchasing power for goods and services. Today's paper currency has no intrinsic value. It is not based on the value of gold or anything else. Under a gold standard, inflation was really limited. With floating value, or fiat, currency, however, some countries have seen inflation reach extremely high levels—sometimes enough to lead to economic collapse. Gold standards have historically provided more stable currencies with lower inflation than fiat currency. Should the United States return to a gold standard? SUBSCRIBE: http://bit.ly/1HVAtKP FOLLOW US: - Website: https://www.learnliberty.org/ - Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LearnLiberty - Twitter: https://twitter.com/LearnLiberty - Google +: http://bit.ly/1hi66Zz LEARN LIBERTY Your resource for exploring the ideas of a free society. We tackle big questions about what makes a society free or prosperous and how we can improve the world we live in. Watch more at http://bit.ly/1UleLbP
Views: 291736 Learn Liberty
108. How Interest Rates Move the Forex Market Part 1
 
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http://www.informedtrades.com/25425-how-interest-rates-move-forex-market-part-1-a.html Like current and future earnings prospects are the most important factors to consider when trying to forecast the long term direction of a stock, current and future interest rate prospects are the most important factors to consider when trying to forecast the long term direction of a currency. Because of this fact, currencies are highly sensitive to any economic news that can affect the country's interest rates, an important factor for traders of all time frames to understand. As we learned in module 8 of our free basics of trading course located in the free course section of InformedTrades.com, when the central bank of a country raises interest rates this not only affects the short term rate that they target, but the interest rates for all types of debt instruments. If the central bank of a country raises interest rates then debt instruments of all types are going to become more attractive to investors, all else being equal. This not only means that foreign investors are more likely to invest in the debt of that country, but also that domestic investors are less likely to look outside the country for higher yield, creating more demand for the debt of that country and driving the value of the currency up, all else being equal. Conversely, when a central bank lowers interest rates, then interest rates on all types of debt instruments for that country are going to be less attractive to investors, all else being equal. This not only means that both foreign and domestic investors are less likely to invest in the debt of that country, but that they are also more likely to pull money out to seek higher returns in other countries, creating less demand for, and a greater market supply of that currency, and driving its value down, all else being equal. Once this is understood, it is next important to understand that foreign investors are exposed to not only the potential profit or loss from interest rate changes on the debt instrument they are investing in, but also to profits and losses which result from fluctuations in the value of that country's currency. This is an important concept to understand, as it generally will work to increase the profits for investors when interest rates increase, as the increase in the value of the currency is realized when they sell the investment and convert back into their home country's currency. This gives the foreign investor that much extra return on their investment, and that much extra incentive to invest when interest rates rise, driving the value of the currency up further all else being equal. Conversely when interest rates decrease, there will be less demand for the debt instruments of a country not only because of the lower yield to investors, but also because of the decrease in the value of the currency that normally comes with a decrease in interest rates. The additional whammy of a loss to the foreign investor from the currency conversion that results as part of the investment, further incitivizes them to put their money elsewhere, decreasing the value of the currency further, all else being equal.
Views: 31253 InformedTrades
What is REVALUATION? What does REVALUATION mean? REVALUATION meaning, definition & explanation
 
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What is REVALUATION? What does REVALUATION mean? REVALUATION meaning - REVALUATION pronunciation - REVALUATION definition - REVALUATION explanation - How to pronounce REVALUATION? SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Revaluation is a change in a price of a good or product, or especially of a currency, in which case it is specifically an official rise of the value of the currency in relation to a foreign currency in a fixed exchange rate system. Under floating exchange rates, by contrast, a rise in a currency's value is an appreciation. Altering the face value of a currency without changing its purchasing power is a redenomination, not a revaluation (this is typically accomplished by issuing a new currency with a different, usually lower, face value and a different, usually higher, exchange rate while leaving the old currency unchanged; then the new replaces the old). In a fixed exchange rate system, the central bank maintains an officially announced exchange rate by standing ready to buy or sell foreign currency at that rate. In general terms, revaluation of a currency is a calculated adjustment to a country's official exchange rate relative to a chosen baseline. The baseline could in principle be anything from wage rates to the price of gold to a foreign currency. In a fixed exchange rate regime, only a decision by a country's government (specifically, its central bank) can alter the official value of the currency. In contrast, a devaluation is an official reduction in the value of the currency. For example, suppose a government has set 10 units of its currency equal to one US dollar. To revalue, the government might change the rate to 9.9 units per dollar. This would result in that currency being slightly more expensive to people buying that currency with U.S. dollars than previously and the US dollar costing slightly less to those buying it with foreign currency. If the fixed value of a currency is sufficiently low, the central bank will experience an inflow of foreign currency, because foreigners will find it inexpensive to acquire the local currency from the central bank and use it to purchase locally produced goods, and so they will do a lot of that. With foreign currency flowing into its store of reserves, in principle the central bank could maintain this situation indefinitely, and indeed domestic exporters will like this situation. However, the central bank may experience political pressure from two sources to increase the value of the currency: Domestic consumers will complain that they find it expensive to acquire foreign currency with which to buy importable goods; and foreign governments, on behalf of foreign exporters, may urge such a revaluation to improve their countries' sale of exports. A revaluation of the local currency to a higher value vis-a-vis other currencies will make it less expensive for local consumers to acquire the foreign funds with which to import foreign goods, so they will do more importing. Domestic producers, on the other hand, will be able to sell fewer export goods because foreign consumers will find it more expensive to obtain the local funds with which to pay for them; so the country will export less. Thus its balance of trade will move to a smaller surplus or to a deficit, and the central bank will experience a decrease in its net inflow of foreign currency to its reserves, or even a reversal to a net outflow.
Views: 594 The Audiopedia
What is CURRENCY CRISIS? What does CURRENCY CRISIS mean' CURRENCY CRISIS meaning & explanation
 
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What is CURRENCY CRISIS? What does CURRENCY CRISIS mean' CURRENCY CRISIS meaning - CURRENCY CRISIS definition - CURRENCY CRISIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ A currency crisis is a situation in which serious doubt exists as to whether a country's central bank has sufficient foreign exchange reserves to maintain the country's fixed exchange rate. The crisis is often accompanied by a speculative attack in the foreign exchange market. A currency crisis results from chronic balance of payments deficits, and thus is also called a balance of payments crisis. Often such a crisis culminates in a devaluation of the currency. A currency crisis is a type of financial crisis, and is often associated with a real economic crisis. A currency crisis raises the probability of a banking crisis or a default crisis. During a currency crisis the value of foreign denominated debt will rise drastically relative to the declining value of the home currency. Financial institutions and the government will struggle to meet debt obligations and economic crisis may ensue. Causation also runs the other way. The probability of a currency crisis rises when a country is experiencing a banking or default crisis. To offset the damage resulting from a banking or default crisis, a central bank will often increase currency issuance, which can decrease reserves to a point where a fixed exchange rate breaks. The linkage between currency, banking, and default crises increases the chance of twin crises or even triple crises, outcomes in which the economic cost of each individual crisis is enlarged. Currency crises can be especially destructive to small open economies or bigger, but not sufficiently stable ones. Governments often take on the role of fending off such attacks by satisfying the excess demand for a given currency using the country's own currency reserves or its foreign reserves (usually in the United States dollar, Euro or Pound sterling). Currency crises have large, measurable costs on an economy, but the ability to predict the timing and magnitude of crises is limited by theoretical understanding of the complex interactions between macroeconomic fundamentals, investor expectations, and government policy. A currency crisis may also have political implications for those in power. Following a currency crisis a change in the head of government and a change in the finance minister and/or central bank governor are more likely to occur. There is no widely accepted definition of a currency crisis, which is normally considered as part of a financial crisis. Kaminsky et al. (1998), for instance, define currency crises as when a weighted average of monthly percentage depreciations in the exchange rate and monthly percentage declines in exchange reserves exceeds its mean by more than three standard deviations. Frankel and Rose (1996) define a currency crisis as a nominal depreciation of a currency of at least 25% but it is also defined at least 10% increase in the rate of depreciation. In general, a currency crisis can be defined as a situation when the participants in an exchange market come to recognize that a pegged exchange rate is about to fail, causing speculation against the peg that hastens the failure and forces a devaluation or appreciation. Recessions attributed to currency crises include the 1994 economic crisis in Mexico, 1997 Asian Financial Crisis, 1998 Russian financial crisis, and the Argentine economic crisis (1999-2002).
Views: 1043 The Audiopedia
Dollar($) के सामने Rupee की कीमत कैसे और कौन तय करता है? How are Rupee-Dollar rates determined?
 
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Why Indian RUPEE is falling against US dollar? and why prices of petrol & diesel is also increase? Link : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTJfM8r_q3A In the past few days, a shocking news came to India's economy when the price of rupee reached level 73 against the dollar. This was the biggest drop in rupees in the history of India. how dollar's value is determined by the rupee and who decides it? important to know the history of Indian Rupee, what happened in history with Indian Rupee. So today the rupee value is around 72 in front of $1, the price of $1 was equal to one rupee in 1947. And then what has happened is that in the last 70 years rupee is more than the dollar Continued decreasing. Is there any reason for the cost of the currency because the price of the currency of the country is more or less? Now borrowed the loan, due to this, the Indian government had to reduce the cost of the rupee for the first time. The main reason for the rupee's fall was the promotion of foreign investment, as well as promoting exports. So that the foreign reserve could be increased. After independence, India adopted the fixed exchange rate system. Under the system, the government had decided that what would be the cost of Indian rupee against the dollar? Because of this, the price of Rupee has been around Rs 4.79 against the dollar since 1948. In the year 1971, the link of Indian Rupee was abolished with British pound and rupee was paired with a straight dollar. After that, till 1975, the dollar reached 8 rupees against the dollar and in the year 1985, the price of $1 was up to 12 rupees. Then came, the year 1991, The slow pace of inflation and development had broken the back of Indian economy. And India's foreign exchange was almost over, the government had to devalue the rupee again to keep the reserves of the foreign reserves alive. Because of that, in 1991, the price of one dollar reached 17 rupees. After which the government adopted Flexible Exchange Rate policy instead of the fixed exchange rate in 1993. That is, the price of the dollar was now going to decide the market, which was earlier decided by the government. But in this new system, some power was given in the hands of the RBI to stabilize the dollar rate. After this policy, the price of the rupee declined significantly. Now, instead of 1 dollar, 31 rupees would have to be repaid. After this gradually the strength of the remaining rupees was reduced, and by the year 2010, it had crossed 45 rupees. and by the year 2013, the price of one dollar had crossed 63 rupees and in spite of all the efforts of the RBI on the Modi government in 2018, the price of $1 has reached 73 rupees. Actually, the value of money depends on many things such as inflation, employment, interest rate, growth rate, trade deficit, volatility of equity markets, foreign currency reserves and so many other factors, which make rupee weak and strong Are there. whole game is foreign reserve, that is foreign currency. The foreign reserve is connected by import and export. The country which buys more import means that it buys more things from outside, its foreign reserves are lower, due to which the currency value decreases. And the same country exports more, that means, sending out more things outside, there is more foreign currency in the country, which increases the foreign reserve, which also increases the value of the currency of that country. But in this, the government has to make a balance, because if the currency of a country is strong then the external country will buy less from it. Which reduces exports. interest rate of RBI. If the interest rate on the deposit is high, people from foreign countries will invest more. And if the same interest rate is low, then there will be a decrease in foreign investment. Talking about today, the first reason for the rupee weakness is the rising prices of crude oil. Because of which the government has to pay more in foreign currency, which is decreasing the foreign reserve. The second reason is the trade deficit. Which is estimated to increase by 2.5% by 2019, the trade deficit decreases in foreign reserves, and the rupee fall in price To know more about what is a trade deficit, you must definitely see the main reason for the fall of Indian rupees; in that we have talked about it. And the dollar's rising demand in the international market is also an important reason for the rupee weakening, now what the Modi government does to stop it, we will be able to see it all in the coming time. Countries such as Russia, Russia and Iran have started taking some steps to curb the dollar, in which they are planning to use gold instead of dollars in imports export. But what is the future of rupees?
Exchange Rate Class XII Economics by S K Agarwala
 
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For the first time in INDIA, textbook in Economics, Accountancy & Business Studies with FREE Video Lectures by Eminent Authors/Subject Expert. To buy books visit www.goyal-books.com To view FREE Video Lectures visit www.goyalsOnline.com/commerce About the Book » Written strictly according to the latest syllabus prescribed by the CB.S.E., New Delhi. » Up-to-date study material provided by using the latest available data. » Elaborate explanation of the concepts. » Summary (Points to Remember) given at the end of each Chapter. » Numerical Problems from previous years' question papers incorporated and solved in the respective Chapters. » Methodology of solving typical numerical problems given wherever necessary. » Methodology of drawing typical diagrams given wherever necessary. » Comprehensive Exercises given at the end of each Chapter. » Sample Question Paper given at the end of the book. » Multi-disciplinay Problems given at the end of the books. » Video lectures on each topic with replies to queries for better and clear understanding of the concepts by the Author/Subject Matter Expert. Benefits of Video Lectures » Easy to access anytime: With video lectures, students can learn anywhere from their mobile devices: desktops, laptops, tablets or smartphones. » Students learn when they are primed to learn. » Students can pause, rewind and replay the lecture. » Eases the distraction of having to transcribe the lectures. » Self-paced learning: Students can follow along with the lecture at their own pace, going more slowly or quickly » Bookmarking: Students can bookmark the point where they're up to in the video so they can easily return and continue watching the lecture at a later point. » Searchability: Students can easily search through the lecture to find the required sub-topic they need, without having to rewind and fast forward throughout the video. » Greater accuracy: Students will understand the lecture better and can make sure that they have not misheard anything. » Facilitates thinking and problem solving: It improves research skills, collaborative working, problem solving, technology and organisational skills.
What is FOREIGN EXCHANGE HEDGE? What does FOREIGN EXCHANGE HEDGE mean?
 
06:38
What is FOREIGN EXCHANGE HEDGE? What does FOREIGN EXCHANGE HEDGE mean? FOREIGN EXCHANGE HEDGE definition - FOREIGN EXCHANGE HEDGE meaning - FOREIGN EXCHANGE HEDGE explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. A foreign exchange hedge (also called a FOREX hedge) is a method used by companies to eliminate or "hedge" their foreign exchange risk resulting from transactions in foreign currencies (see foreign exchange derivative). This is done using either the cash flow hedge or the fair value method. The accounting rules for this are addressed by both the International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) and by the US Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (US GAAP) as well as other national accounting standards. A foreign exchange hedge transfers the foreign exchange risk from the trading or investing company to a business that carries the risk, such as a bank. There is cost to the company for setting up a hedge. By setting up a hedge, the company also forgoes any profit if the movement in the exchange rate would be favourable to it. When companies conduct business across borders, they must deal in foreign currencies. Companies must exchange foreign currencies for home currencies when dealing with receivables, and vice versa for payables. This is done at the current exchange rate between the two countries. Foreign exchange risk is the risk that the exchange rate will change unfavorably before payment is made or received in the currency . For example, if a United States company doing business in Japan is compensated in yen, that company has risk associated with fluctuations in the value of the yen versus the United States dollar. A hedge is a type of derivative, or a financial instrument, that derives its value from an underlying asset. Hedging is a way for a company to minimize or eliminate foreign exchange risk. Two common hedges are forward contracts and options. A forward contract will lock in an exchange rate today at which the currency transaction will occur at the future date. An option sets an exchange rate at which the company may choose to exchange currencies. If the current exchange rate is more favorable, then the company will not exercise this option. The main difference between the hedge methods is who derives the benefit of a favourable movement in the exchange rate. With a forward contract the other party derives the benefit, while with an option the company retains the benefit by choosing not to exercise the option if the exchange rate moves in its favour. Guidelines for accounting for financial derivatives are given under IFRS 7. Under this standard, “an entity shall group financial instruments into classes that are appropriate to the nature of the information disclosed and that take into account the characteristics of those financial instruments. An entity shall provide sufficient information to permit reconciliation to the line items presented in the balance sheet”. Derivatives should be grouped together on the balance sheet and valuation information should be disclosed in the footnotes. This seems fairly straightforward, but IASB has issued two standards to help further explain this procedure. The International Accounting Standards IAS 32 and 39 help to give further direction for the proper accounting of derivative financial instruments. IAS 32 defines a “financial instrument” as “any contract that gives rise to a financial asset of one entity and a financial liability or equity instrument of another entity”. Therefore, a forward contract or option would create a financial asset for one entity and a financial liability for another. The entity required to pay the contract holds a liability, while the entity receiving the contract payment holds an asset.
Views: 4155 The Audiopedia
HKD to Peso exchange rate on the rise for OFW remittance
 
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HKD to Peso exchange rate on the rise for OFW remittance Go to http://www.hkpinoytv.com for more news on the Hong Kong Filipino community. HKD to Peso exchange rate on the rise for OFW remittance Dagsa ang ating kababayan sa pagpapadala ng pera para sa kanilang mahal sa buhay noong nakaraang Linggo. Maliban sa unang Linggo ito ng buwan at suweldo ng karamihan noong katapusan ng buwan ng Pebrero, ang mataas na palit ng dolyar sa Piso ay naging dahilan din upang makapagpadala sa kanilang pamilya sa atin. Sa ilang remittance shops sa Worldwide, mahabang pila ang nasaksihan ng HKPinoyTV. Ang palitan ng bawat isang HKD sa Piso ay nagmumula sa P6.28 hanggang P6.48 noong Linggo gamit ay kilalang bangko at ilang remittance shops ng pagpapadala ng pera sa atin. Facebook=https://www.facebook.com/HKPinoyTVNews/ Website=http://www.hkpinoytv.com SUBSCRIBE=https://www.youtube.com/user/HKPinoyTV -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=--=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-­=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= NOTE=I DO NOT OWN ANY OF THE MUSIC IN THE VIDEO. THE CREDIT GOES TO THE RESPECTIVE MUSIC CREATORS ----------------------------------------­----------------------------------------­-----
Views: 4031 HKPinoyTV
L3/P2: Rupee Devaluation & Exchange rate regimes
 
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Language: Hindi, Topics Covered: - if $1=50 or $1=60: who decides this exchange rate and how? - Fixed exchange rate regime: mechanism and limitations. - Floating exchange rate regime: mechanism limitations. - Difference between devaluation and depreciation of Rupee - Difference between revaluation and appreciation of rupee? - Historic trend of Indian rupee’s fall/weakening against US dollar - How does devaluation of the currency boost its exports? - Difference between NEER and REER? How does it help determining whether currency is undervalued or overvalued? - “Managed” floating extended rate regime. Powerpoint available at http://Mrunal.org/download Exam-Utility: UPSC CSAT, CDS, CAPF, Bank, RBI, IBPS, SSC and other competitive exams, IIM, XLRI, MBA interviews and GDPI Venue: Sardar Patel Institute of Public Administration (SPIPA), Satellite, Ahmedabad, Gujarat,India
Views: 260803 Mrunal Patel
US-China Meeting Starts With Call for Fair Exchange Rate
 
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This is the VOA Special English Economics Report, from http://voaspecialenglish.com | http://facebook.com/voalearningenglish American Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner recently urged China to let the exchange value of its money rise. Mister Geithner was among top officials from both countries who gathered in Beijing for the U.S.-China Strategic Dialogue. Their goal was to increase cooperation on security and economic issues.Secretary of State Hillary Clinton spoke as the meeting opened on May third. She said the two sides were working to build a relationship so that both countries grow without unhealthy competition or conflict.She noted that nations must deal with issues of economics and international politics in a way that is not 'win or lose', or what she called zero-sum. Secretary Clinton also said that both the United States and China have to meet responsibilities to their own citizens and the international community. The value of China's money, the yuan, was among the economic issues discussed at the meeting. In early May, the exchange rate was over six yuan to the American dollar. The United States says China intervenes in foreign currency markets to keep the exchange value of the yuan low. A lower value means Chinese exports are less costly than their competitors. Critics also say China unfairly supports its industries with many other forms of government support. Last year, America's trade deficit with China reached a record two hundred ninety-five billion dollars. At the talks with American officials, Chinese Vice Premier Wang Qishan defended his country's money policy. He said China is moving at a measured rate to make its currency more flexible. And he urged the United States not to "politicize" economic issues. Mister Wang also called on the United States to ease controls on high-technology exports and increase Chinese access to financial markets. Secretary Geithner said China had moved toward a better way of valuing the yuan. But he said more reform was needed. He said a strong, more market-determined yuan will help strengthen China's economic reform goal of moving toward higher value-added production. Currency reform, said Mister Geithner, also was important to China's financial system and to increasing consumer demand at home. For VOA Special English, I'm Alex Villarreal. You can find more news about economics at voaspecialenglish.com.(Adapted from a radio program broadcast 04May2012)
Views: 34503 VOA Learning English
Interest rates and the effect on exchange rates
 
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You wanted an explanation. Here it is.
Views: 3610 Michael Norman
1  Foreign Exchange Rate
 
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Meaning of Foreign Exchange Rate - forex rate, FX rate, rate is the rate at which one currency will be exchanged for another. Exchange rates are determined in the foreign exchange market. The buying rate is the rate at which money dealers will buy foreign currency, and the selling rate is the rate at which they will sell the currency. Each country, through varying mechanisms, manages the value of its currency. As part of this function, it determines the exchange rate regime that will apply to its currency. For example, the currency may be free-floating, pegged or fixed, or a hybrid.
Views: 881 financeschoolin
Relationship between bond prices and interest rates | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Why bond prices move inversely to changes in interest rate. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/treasury-bond-prices-and-yields?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/introduction-to-the-yield-curve?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Both corporations and governments can borrow money by selling bonds. This tutorial explains how this works and how bond prices relate to interest rates. In general, understanding this not only helps you with your own investing, but gives you a lens on the entire global economy. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 540093 Khan Academy
#73, Demand of foreign exchange and demand curve(Class 12 macroeconomics)
 
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Class 12 macroeconomics. ... Foreign exchange rate... Demand of foreign exchange... Rise in demand of foreign exchange.... Demand curve of foreign exchange...... Contact for my book 7690041256 Economics on your tips video 73 Our books are now available on Amazon Special Combo - Economics on your tips Micro + Macro http://amzn.in/d/eSxj5Ui Economics on your tips Macroeconomics http://amzn.in/d/2AMX85O Economics on your tips Microeconomics http://amzn.in/d/cZykZVK Official series of playlists UG courses ( bcom, bba, bca, ba, honours) – https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLgC10_Xv-BGirAqOr-hU8e-N_Nz0UpgJ- Micro economics complete course – https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLgC10_Xv-BGg5n3YU6oEV7_HIzBuEbbOz Macro economics complete course- https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLgC10_Xv-BGg2ORORpILqiDR1gyH3MkXw Statistics complete course- https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLgC10_Xv-BGjrAkDyeMioJ7DEexAEeVdt National income – https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLgC10_Xv-BGjpE-1V4uz_0wvvbZQnSsj_ In order to promote us and help us grow Paytm on - 7690041256
Views: 181687 Economics on your tips
Why indian rupee is falling against dollar Telugu
 
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Why indian rupee is falling against dollar #telugutechtuts #dollar #rupee Gihosoft Photo Eraser: Erase unwanted objects and perfect your amazing photos! http://bit.ly/2QrjVYc Jihosoft Photo Eraser: http://bit.ly/2N8cOpr Email:[email protected] Telegram : http://t.me/telugutechtuts Telugu Tech Tuts App: https://goo.gl/cJYHvX Telugu Tech Guru :https://www.youtube.com/TeluguTechguru Follow me on Fb: https://www.facebook.com/TeluguTechTuts/ Follw me on Fb Page: https://www.facebook.com/timecomputersin Follow me on Twitter : https://twitter.com/hafizsd Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/telugutechtuts/ website : www.timecomputers.in Website: http://telugutechguru.com/ Subscribe Link: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=hafiztime my laptop : https://amzn.to/2N2JgW3 My Mic: http://amzn.to/2Fs3ODj Lighting : http://amzn.to/2nmtB8F My mic: http://amzn.to/2DCyAcI My Mic: https://goo.gl/TDYK74 My Tripod: https://goo.gl/XNpjny Dslr : https://goo.gl/JS27gH Small Mic: http://amzn.to/2hYUEb6 -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Please watch: "ఈ మొబైల్స్ కొనకండి | మీ డబ్బులు కాపాడుకోండి" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m6IBjIZFxcY -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Views: 20943 Telugu TechTuts
What is currency manipulation? | CNBC Explains
 
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President Trump has backtracked on calling China a currency manipulator, but what does it mean exactly? CNBC's Uptin Saiidi explains. ----- Subscribe to CNBC International: http://cnb.cx/2gft82z Like our Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/cnbcinternational Follow us on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/cnbcinternational/ Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/CNBCi Subscribe to our WeChat broadcast CNBC_international
Views: 131583 CNBC International
The relationship between the Current Account Balance and Exchange Rates
 
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This lesson will illustrate how trade flows should lead to appreciation and depreciation of currencies in a floating exchange rate system, and then explain how in the case of China, central bank policy aimed at buying large quantities of US government debt keeps the supply of Chinese currency high in the US and the demand for US dollars high in China. This means the dollar remains stronger than it otherwise might relative to the Chinese RMB, contributing to the persistent trade deficits the US exhibits in its trade with China. Want to learn more about economics, or just be ready for an upcoming quiz, test or end of year exam? Jason Welker is available for tutoring, IB internal assessment and extended essay support, and other services to support economics students and teachers. Learn more here! http://econclassroom.com/?page_id=5870
Views: 114993 Jason Welker
Word of the Day: Currency Peg
 
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Watch more Capital Account @ http://www.youtube.com/CapitalAccount http://twitter.com/laurenlyster http://twitter.com/coveringdelta A currency peg, otherwise referred to as a fixed exchange rate, is a type of exchange system wherein a currency's value is matched to the value of another single currency or to a basket of other currencies, or to another measure of value, such as gold. The most readily well-known "currency manipulator" is China, which pegs the yuan to the us dollar. Their's is a flexible peg, but a peg nonetheless, and we look at this during our word of the day, as well as the case of Argentina. These are two very different types of currency pegs. In the case of the yuan, China artificially undervalues their currency relative to the dollar, in an effort to cheapen their exports and drive growth with sales to the US and other countries. This is an export led growth model, facilitated by a cheap currency. The people's bank of china achieves this buy regularly going out into the open market and buying us dollars in return of chinese yuan. This helps to push down the value of the yuan relative to the dollar, cheapening the chinese currency, but also causing inflation domestically because china has to print all this extra money in order to soak up the USD it buys. When a country like china loosens it's peg, its currency will naturally rise. In the case of Argentina, the central bank in that country was keeping its currency artificially high relative to the USD. When Argentina headed into depression during the early 2000's it became increasingly difficult for the country to maintain the peg, because in the case of countries that are artificially increasing the value of their currency, the national central bank had to intervene in the market by selling foreign exchange reserve in return for pesos. This had its limits, since the Argentinian central bank only had so many reserves to sell. The advantage of having a strong and stable currency, as was the case in Argentina throughout the 90's is that it attracts a lot of foreign capital. However, when times get tough, a lot of that capital can leave and then you can find yourself bankrupt very quickly.
Views: 9684 RT America
Barry Eichengreen: Pegged exchange rates
 
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Barry Eichengreen, an economist, compares the problems of the gold standard to those of the European Monetary System and the Eurozone. From The Economy, published free online by The CORE Project (http://core-econ.org).
Views: 3311 CORE team
12 Pros And Cons Of Devaluation of Currency
 
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Pros: 1. Exports become cheaper and more competitive to foreign buyers.  2. Higher level of exports should lead to an improvement in the current account deficit. 3. It will make balance of payment favourable if that export increases and import decreases. 4. Higher exports can lead to higher rates of economic growth. 5. Devaluation is a less damaging way to restore competitiveness than ‘internal devaluation’.  6. It can also increase the domestic employment. Cons: 1. It is likely to cause inflation. 2. Reduces the purchasing power of citizens abroad. 3. A large and rapid devaluation may scare off international investors. 4. Devalued currency cannot pay their costly imports so they look for foreign debt. 5. Firms / exporters have less incentive to cut costs because they can rely on the devaluation to improve competitiveness. 6. If consumers have debts, e.g. mortgages in foreign currency – after a devaluation, they will see a sharp rise in the cost of their debt repayments.
Views: 1045 Patel Vidhu
Chapter 18 Part 2:  Exchange Rate Regimes
 
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This video discusses the various exchange rate regimes. Thanks for watching!
Dollar Exchange Rate Pound US
 
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Dollar exchange rate: Pound up against US currency after latest inflation data THE pound edged up against the US dollar after inflation in America hit its lowest level since October 2015 years. Sterling lifted to 1.289 against the US currency, as America's price rises came in lower than expected at 1.9 per cent for April. Lower inflation could mean central bank the US Federal Reserve is less likely to raise interest rates next month, as expected. Expectations of looser monetary policy has hit the dollar.
Views: 10728 Real Thing TV
Falling value of Indian Rupee against US Dollar- अर्थव्यवस्था पर इसका असर - Current Affairs 2018
 
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Views: 81309 Study IQ education
What is CURRENCY FUTURE? What does CURRENCY FUTURE mean? CURRENCY FUTURE meaning & explanation
 
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What is CURRENCY FUTURE? What does CURRENCY FUTURE mean? CURRENCY FUTURE meaning - CURRENCY FUTURE definition - CURRENCY FUTURE explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ A currency future, also known as an FX future or a foreign exchange future, is a futures contract to exchange one currency for another at a specified date in the future at a price (exchange rate) that is fixed on the purchase date; see Foreign exchange derivative. Typically, one of the currencies is the US dollar. The price of a future is then in terms of US dollars per unit of other currency. This can be different from the standard way of quoting in the spot foreign exchange markets. The trade unit of each contract is then a certain amount of other currency, for instance €125,000. Most contracts have physical delivery, so for those held at the end of the last trading day, actual payments are made in each currency. However, most contracts are closed out before that. Investors can close out the contract at any time prior to the contract's delivery date. Currency futures were first created in 1970 at the International Commercial Exchange in New York. But the contracts did not "take off" because the Bretton Woods system was still in effect. They did so a full two years before the Chicago Mercantile Exchange (CME) in 1972, less than one year after the system of fixed exchange rates was abandoned along with the gold standard. Some commodity traders at the CME did not have access to the inter-bank exchange markets in the early 1970s, when they believed that significant changes were about to take place in the currency market. The CME actually now gives credit to the International Commercial Exchange (not to be confused with ICE) for creating the currency contract, and state that they came up with the idea independently of the International Commercial Exchange. The CME established the International Monetary Market (IMM) and launched trading in seven currency futures on May 16, 1972. Today, the IMM is a division of CME. In the fourth quarter of 2009, CME Group FX volume averaged 754,000 contracts per day, reflecting average daily notional value of approximately $100 billion. Currently most of these are traded electronically. Other futures exchanges that trade currency futures are Euronext.liffe, Tokyo Financial Exchange and Intercontinental Exchange . As with other futures, the conventional maturity dates are the IMM dates, namely the third Wednesday in March, June, September and December. The conventional option maturity dates are the first Friday after the first Wednesday for the given month. Investors use these futures contracts to hedge against foreign exchange risk. If an investor will receive a cashflow denominated in a foreign currency on some future date, that investor can lock in the current exchange rate by entering into an offsetting currency futures position that expires on the date of the cashflow. For example, Jane is a US-based investor who will receive €1,000,000 on December 1. The current exchange rate implied by the futures is $1.2/€. She can lock in this exchange rate by selling €1,000,000 worth of futures contracts expiring on December 1. That way, she is guaranteed an exchange rate of $1.2/€ regardless of exchange rate fluctuations in the meantime. Currency futures can also be used to speculate and, by incurring a risk, attempt to profit from rising or falling exchange rates. For example, Peter buys 10 September CME Euro FX Futures, at $1.2713/€. At the end of the day, the futures close at $1.2784/€. The change in price is $0.0071/€. As each contract is over €125,000, and he has 10 contracts, his profit is $8,875. As with any future, this is paid to him immediately. More generally, each change of $0.0001/€ (the minimum Commodity tick size), is a profit or loss of $12.50 per contract.
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Nominal Exchange Rate v/s Real Effective Exchange Rate
 
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This video will help viewers understand the difference between Nominal Exchange Rate and Real Effective Exchange Rate. This video gives some serious insights on how inflation affects the real value of a currency. Please leave us a comment/suggestion on our video and do hit "LIKE" if you like the video. SUBSCRIBE TO OUR CHANNEL FOR FULL ACCESS TO ALL OUR VIDEOS ABOUT US: Ambition Learning Solutions is a preemptive training institute providing trainings to undergraduates, post graduates and working professionals on various international certification programs like Certified Financial Planner (CFP), Certified Credit Research Analyst (CCRA), Basics of Financial Markets, Macro Economic Indicators impacting the Financial Markets, Derivatives Market, Technical Analysis, Credit Research, Commercial Banking, Investment Banking, Financial Modeling, Advance Excel, Equity Research, Diploma in Banking and Finance (DBF), NSE's Certified Capital Market Professional (NCCMP) etc. We assist corporate by providing qualified human resources for their operation and expansion requirement. We train their existing staff to furnish them with the latest updates and techniques in their respective domains. Reach us at: Website: www.ambitionlearning.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/ambitionlearning/ Email: [email protected] Linkedin: http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=67196015&trk=wvmp-profile
Fixed vs. Flexible Exchange Rate Regimes and Policies
 
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Interview granted to "Nova Makedonija" 1. What is your opinion about fixed exchange rate regimes? A. Fixed exchange rate regimes are useful in crisis circumstances, when the restoration of stability and the trust of citizens, investors, and speculators is essential. Such harsh measures, usually coupled with capital controls, should be short-term and lifted immediately when the economy had picked up and expectations have settled. Maintaining a fixed-rate regime in the long-term has nefarious and dangerous consequences as the exchange rate diverges further and further from the real value of the currency, adjusted to inflation. This erodes the competitiveness of exporters, renders imports relatively cheap, distorts the price signal throughout the economy (in other words: people don't know what the real value of their currency is abroad). It also leads to speculative attacks on the currency from the outside (if the currency is convertible and traded in free foreign exchange markets) - or from the inside (in the form of a thriving black foreign exchange market.) 2. What is the connection between exchange rate policies and better economic results? A. This depends on how open the country is to the global capital markets and what percentage of its GDP is made up of international trade and various transfers from abroad (such as remittances.) As a rule, the more exposed a country is to the ups and downs of the global market, the more it should have a flexible and adaptable exchange rate policy. A country that exports and imports a lot needs to have competitive manufacturing, services (e.g., tourism), and agricultural sectors. An important part of such competitiveness is having the correct exchange rate which reflects inflation differentials, purchasing power disparities, relative advantages, and structural elements. Such constant adjustment (up AND down, for instance within a band) is excluded by a fixed rate regime. By adopting a fixed exchange rate, the country is giving up on one of its most important automatic economic stabilizers and policy tools, as Greece is discovering now to its great cost. 3. Is a fixed exchange rate good for controlling inflation? Is there a possibility to control the prices and make a correction of the value of the currency? Inflation reflects expectations of the population regarding the future level of prices. These expectations are affected by the level of stability inside the country - but also by factors outside it. In a country that is open to international trade, foreign capital flows, and foreign direct investment, external instability is far more important than internal stability. Indeed, in countries like Macedonia, Israel, and Brazil, most of the inflation comes from the outside via the soaring prices of imports such as energy products, foodstuffs, and raw materials. There is little the monetary authorities can do to affect such imported inflation. Still, it is true that a string of unannounced, arbitrary, unscripted, incomprehensible, and large devaluations will create inflation. The exchange rate policy has to be transparent, predictable, rational, and adaptable. There are dozens of countries around the world with various modesl of flexible exchange rates and, yet, with stable prices: these two are not mutually exclusive. Flexible exchange rates mean that the currency can do down (devaluation) - but also up (appreciation or revaluation.) 4. What happens to an economy if people from abroad stop sending money? Depends on: (1) What is the share of remittances in the GDP; and (2) What are the remittances used for. In most poor countries remittances constitute 10-15% of GDP and they are used by the recipients mostly for consumption. When remittances decline, consumption and GDP are adversely affected, the level of foreign exchange reserves declines, and outlays on social welfare increase. 5. Can a country defeat the trade deficit with a fixed exchange rate? The exchange rate is only one component in the overall competitiveness of the economy. Structural reforms in the public sector and various institutions; infusion of management and marketing skills; innovation; a functioning financial system; new inputs (equipment, information technology, intellectual property under license); focused and up-to- date training and re-skilling; better access to core export markets; the economic conditions in these export markets; level and relevance of the workforce's education; mentality and ethos - all these are as important as the exchange rate alone. Germany and Japan had overvalued currencies for decades and still were able to achieve prosperity and dominate international trade.
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Interest Rate Parity Theory (Forex) | CA Final SFM (New Syllabus) Classes & Videos
 
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We simplify your financial learnings. ►►Subscribe here to learn more of Strategic Financial Management: https://goo.gl/HTY5SN CA Final SFM Fast Track Course: https://sfmguru.in/ca-final-sfm/ Interest Rate Parity Theory The interest rates prevailing in two countries shall be the basis for determining the Fair Forward Price. The actual forward rate has to be same as Fair Forward Price. Otherwise, Arbitrage Opportunity arises. Arbitrage means “making risk free gains”. The theory believes that the exchange rate between the two currencies purely depend upon the interest rates prevailing in the two respective countries. For example, interest rate prevailing in India is 12% p.a. and that in US is 7% p.a., one would try to take advantage of the given situation i.e. by borrowing in US at 7% p.a. and investing in India at 12% p.a. thereby earning the net differential interest of 5% p.a., this is somehow not that simple. In fact as per Interest Rate Parity Theory this is not possible. By the end of the year the exchange rates between ` and $ would have changed adversely in such a way that the interest differential so earned shall be compensated by the exchange loss arising on repayment of US loan. If Interest Rate Parity Theory does not hold good, it will give rise to possibility of arbitrage i.e., making risk free assured gains. The moment arbitragers start using this opportunity for arbitrage gain, the interest rates as well as exchange rates start fluctuating until the equilibrium is achieved i.e., to say Interest Rate Parity Theory starts working. Example on Interest Rate Parity Theory Interest rate prevailing in India 12% p.a. Interest rate prevailing in US 7% p.a. Spot Rate: 1 $ = ` 64 In the given scenario, anyone would want to take advantage of earning interest rate differential of 12% – 7% = 5% by borrowing in US and investing in India. As a result the total gain that can be made in one year based on $ 1,00,000: $ 1,00,000 X `64/$ X 5% = ` 3,20,000 In reality, this gain cannot be made because by end of the year the exchange rate between $ and ` will not be the same. Let us make approximation of such exchange rate using concept of FFR. made through interest rate differentials will be off-set against the resulting exchange loss. Amount Borrowed $ 1,00,000 Add: Interest @ 6% $ 7,000 Total Amount Payable $ 1,07,000 Exchange Rate at the year-end = 66.9907 Therefore, Total Amount Payable = 66.9907 X $ 1,07,000 = ` 71,68,000 Amount Payable as per prevailing Spot Rate at the beginning of the year: $ 1,07,000 X ` 64 = ` 68,48,000 Excess Amount Payable because of Changes in Exchange Rate: ` 71,68,000 – ` 68,48,000 = ` 3,20,000 As per Interest Rate Parity Theory, the resulting exchange loss has completely off-set the gain made through interest rate differential. #InterestRateParity #Forex #CAFinalSFM
How to trade the EUR/USD: Tips & Trading Strategies
 
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★ Trading the EUR/USD Discussing the EUR/USD. ★ You can trade the EUR/USD at Ayondo http://www.financial-spread-betting.com/ccount/click.php?id=62 ★ If you found value in watching this video, PLEASE LIKE AND SHARE so we can do more! Trading the EUR/USD Discussing the EUR/USD. David Paul, Financial Trader and Managing Director of VectorVest UK comments. If you found value in watching this video, PLEASE LIKE AND SHARE so we can do more! David Paul, Financial Trader and Managing Director of VectorVest UK comments. Is there a strategy that you would use to trade the EUR/USD? Are there any pitfalls that one should avoid when trading currencies? Tell us a little about the Euro Tell us a little about the USA Dollar What is the EUR/USD [If you hear another trader saying "I'm buying the Euro", he/she is expecting that the value of the Euro will rise against the US Dollar and speculates by buying the EUR/USD exchange rate.] If the EUR/USD exchange rate equals 1.12565 for instance what does that mean? Noteworthy some Economic Events that impact the Currency Pair? [mention relevant fundamental announcements..etc] Why is the EUR/USD such a popular pair amongst traders? Tell us about the Characteristics and Particularities of the EUR/USD currency pair Tell us a little about the EUR/USD currency pair [who trades it, how easy it is to predict..etc] How volatile is this currency (how much does it typically moves in a trading session?, describe events from the past that led to major moves in this currency pair – mention that it is volatile and unpredictable…etc) What’s the best way to trade this currency? And the best times to trade? [use a trend following strategy?] Mention some trading tips for trading the EUR/USD Any pitfalls to avoid? Does the EUR/USD have any correlations with other currency pairs?
Views: 110747 UKspreadbetting
Exchange Rates Of The Canadian Dollar (CAD)...
 
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Official Exchange Rates Of The Canadian Currency... (Information Source: Bank Of Canada) 1 USD United States Dollar to CAD 1 EUR Euro to CAD 1RUB Russian Ruble to to CAD 1 TRY Turkish Lira to CAD 1 SAR Saudi Arabian Riyal to CAD 1 MXN Mexican Peso to CAD 1 RMB Chinese Renminbi to CAD 1 JPY Japanese Yen to CAD 1 BRL Brazilian Real to CAD 1 CHF Swiss Frank to CAD 1 AUD Australian Dollar to CAD 1KRW South Korean Won to CAD 1 INR Indian Rupee to CAD 1 IDR Indonesian Rupiah to CAD 1 MYR Malaysian Ringgit to CAD Canadian dollar rates today... CAD prices... Exchange rates of the Central Bank of Canada... How much Canadian dollar... USD/CAD forecast... EUR/CAD forecast... Forex and money rates in Canada... Курсы валют канадского доллара (CAD)... Kanada dolarının döviz kuru... أسعار صرف الدولار الكندي (CAD)... 캐나다 달러 (CAD) 환율... カナダドルの為替レート(CAD) ... 加元汇率 ... Taux de change du dollar canadien ... कनाडाई डॉलर की विनिमय दरें ... Tipos de cambio del dólar canadiense ... Taxas de câmbio do dólar canadense ... Tassi di cambio del dollaro canadese ... Kadar Pertukaran Dolar Kanada ... Wechselkurse des kanadischen Dollars ...
What Happens, if 1 ₹ = 1 $ (Rupee=Dollar)
 
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Subscribe Here: - https://goo.gl/fsQayx Instagram :- https://www.instagram.com/harshfacts/ My gears https://goo.gl/csuCq0 https://goo.gl/tEuBwb India's economy is the 10th largest in the world. I was really curious to find out that when will Rupee will be Equal to Dollar and I came across with the discussion on Quora about Indian Economy. Some finance people has mentioned their views on the future of how rupee will trend. So I did some research and made the video. The video is based on Mr. Balaji Viswanathan's answer on Quora, I added some things through my own study but main idea is from his answer. I knew many things before but I learned a lot in my research about Indian economy. I think there are many people who don't know exactly how economy works & always worry about why can't be 1 Rupee = 1 dollar. Here I gave a try to solve your mysterious question through a broader perspective considering the impact on Indian Economy. Anyway Enjoy. Check out the one of the discussion on Quora here. https://goo.gl/oq3Q9I Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HARSHFACTS1/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/HarshHIn Website: http://harshfacts.com/ Source of the Images Used. https://goo.gl/96zhEH Licenses to the content https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/ https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/ https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/br/deed.en https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/ https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/ https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/ https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5/ Music. Whistling_Down_the_Road https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/music https://youtu.be/Q5EnvdWKlHw
Views: 4374411 HARSH FACTS
What Happens If 1 Pakistani Rupee Becomes Equal to 1Dollar 1 Pkr= 1 Dollar
 
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What heppens if 1 (one) pakistani rupee becomes equal to one american dollar 1 pkr = 1 dollar ($) Most of the pakistani have a desire what happens . if 1 pakistani rupee becomes equal to 1 american dollar in a very short time. څه پیښیږی که 1 پاکستانی پاکستانی نرخ د ډیډرډر سره برابر وی There are some advantages and disadvatages of the situation. Lets suppose 1 pakistani rupee becomes equal to 1 american dollar in a night. First of all you have to understand that high currency value of a country does not mean the Economic stregnth of that country If that is true Bangladesh would have more economic stregnth than Japan beacause 1 bangladeshi Taka is 1.4 times greater than Japani Yen Lets talk about Advantages first Buying thing would be more cheaper from outside of the world the reason is importing cost will be less with having high currency situation Buying Expensive Things would be more Cheaper like I phone will have a cost only 700 rupee That would be a great scenario Petrol Price would be more less as a result transportation fee will also reduce These are only the pros of the situation The other side of the story will be quite unpleasent Now have a look on the Disadvantages of the situation Expensive Export: Pakistan have big name Agricultural Producing Countries and earns money on exporting products If export cost increases who would buy from pakistan if it available in market at cheaper rate from other countries upsetting of Foreign investment Other countries are only investing in pakistan beacause of its less labour cost They will not invest in pakistan when labour cost increases freelancers will become jobless Pakistan is contributing huge amount in online working In a result of High currency value, they have to face a hard time People Will Start Using Unnecessary Machines Instead Manpower There may be two reasons High labour cost and low cost of foreign machining products In a result of use machines people with lower standard become jobless too Foreign investment which is already exist in country will move out and market will crash 1 rupee is equal to dollar is not a favourable for growing countries in Any situation Japan Had faced the overvalued currency condition in 1986 Switzerland had also reduced its currency value to overcome such disadvantages Pakistan currency system From 1982 pakistan presedent genral ziaulhaq changed it to floating currency system and named it Rupee In floating currency system State Bank of Pakistan Decides the Value of Currency by comparing on supply and demand with other currencies The governer of state bank of pakistan is not worried about the currency wether it is 100 105 or 110 rupee per dollar but he is worried about the fluctuation of current currency value in a short period Because the stabiilty of currency is very important for investors in market off course High currency is good for country but first Pakistan have to increase the production rate or GDP to be a developed country It is possible by Increasing Production & export but it may take 40 to 50 years May be less if political issues get solved کیا ہوتا ہے 1 پاکستانی کالر 1 ڈولر کے برابر ہے
Views: 8003 UnLim Tech